Current Cardiovascular Diseases News and Events

Current Cardiovascular Diseases News and Events, Cardiovascular Diseases News Articles.
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Give the heart a ketone? It may be beneficial
There is growing evidence that ketone bodies may be beneficial to heart disease patients regardless of the method of delivery used to increase ketone delivery to the heart. A Journal of the American College of Cardiology review paper examines emerging evidence regarding ketone bodies' effects on the heart and the potential for ketone therapy as a cardiovascular intervention in heart disease patients. (2021-02-23)

Air pollution puts children at higher risk of disease in adulthood
First of its kind study reveals evidence that early exposure to dirty air alters genes in a way that could lead to adult heart disease, among other ailments. The findings could change the way medical experts and parents think about the air children breathe and inform clinical interventions. (2021-02-22)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Periodontal disease increases risk of major cardiovascular events
People with periodontitis are at higher risk of experiencing major cardiovascular events, according to new research from Forsyth Institute and Harvard University scientists and colleagues. (2021-02-21)

Study examines aspirin and statin use among older Americans
An analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates that while adults aged 75 years and older do not benefit from taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease, many do so on a regular basis. (2021-02-18)

Déjà brew? Another shot for lovers of coffee
In a world first genetic study, researchers from the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the University of South Australia found that that long-term, heavy coffee consumption - six or more cups a day - can increase the amount of lipids (fats) in your blood to significantly heighten your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). (2021-02-18)

TB study reveals potential targets to treat and control infection
Researchers at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) may have found a new pathway to treat and control tuberculosis (TB), the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), a next-generation sequencing technology, scientists were able to further define the mechanisms that lead to TB infection and latency. (2021-02-16)

Radiomics shows cocaine fuels coronary artery disease risk
Radiomics--the extraction of very detailed quantitative features from medical images--provides a refined understanding of how cocaine use and other risk factors affect the course of coronary artery disease, according to a new study. Researchers said the study shows the power of radiomics to improve understanding of not just cardiovascular disease, but cancer and other conditions as well. (2021-02-16)

Mother's heart health in pregnancy impacts child's heart health in adolescence
A mother's heart health while she is pregnant may have a significant impact on her child's cardiovascular health in early adolescence (ages 10 to 14), according to a new study. It is the first study to examine the implications of a mother's cardiovascular health during pregnancy for offspring health in the longer term. (2021-02-16)

CPAP treatment increases physical activity in adults with sleep apnea, heart disease
A new study found that treating obstructive sleep apnea with CPAP therapy increased self-reported physical activity in adults with a history of heart disease. (2021-02-16)

Spanish scientists uncover early links between cardiovascular risk and brain metabolism
Investigators at the CNIC have discovered a link between brain metabolism, cardiovascular risk, and atherosclerosis during middle age, years before symptoms appear (2021-02-15)

Mid-life cardiovascular disease prevention may protect against later dementia
Employing cardiovascular disease prevention strategies in mid-life may delay or stop the brain alterations that can lead to dementia later in life, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-15)

Women have a lower range of 'normal' blood pressure than men
A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that women have a lower ''normal'' blood pressure range compared to men. The findings were published today in the peer-reviewed journal Circulation. (2021-02-15)

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation
In the inky blackness of space an invisible threat is ever present - radiation. It can have a huge array of negative effects on astronaut health, including cardiovascular disease. However, if we are ever to journey to the red planet, we will need to understand and reduce this risk. A new review charts a course through what we know about the cardiovascular risks of space radiation, and the best ways to protect space travelers. (2021-02-12)

ACC urges COVID-19 vaccine prioritization for highest risk heart disease patients
COVID-19 vaccine prioritization should prioritize those with advanced cardiovascular (CVD) disease over well-managed CVD disease, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) health policy statement published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). (2021-02-12)

New guidance addresses structural racism in racial and ethnic disparities research
Scientific research on racial and ethnic disparities must shift to reflect the significant role and impact of structural racism. Clearly defined parameters in research publishing are recommended to ensure structural racism is at the forefront of disparities research. (2021-02-11)

Patient education program with mental health component reduces cardiovascular disease risks
People who participated in an integrated mental and physical health patient education program maintained significant improvements on seven of nine health measures six months after the program's conclusion. Study by University of Illinois social work professor Tara M. Powell and Jordan's Royal Health Awareness Society. (2021-02-11)

Tailor-made drugs to treat epilepsy or cardiovascular diseases
In order for a drug to be effective at the right places in the body, it helps if scientists can predict as accurately as possible how the molecules of that drug will interact with human cells. In a joint research project, scientists from Leipzig University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai have succeeded in elucidating such a structure, namely that of the neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 with one of its ligands. (2021-02-10)

Lessons from the flu season
Australian researchers have come up with two key recommendations from studies of the annual influenza season - one highlighting the benefits of antivirals in reducing repeat hospitalisation, and the other to watch for underlying cardiovascular disease. While the world focuses on the rising COVID-19 death toll, seasonal influenza continues to cause significant mortality and poses a significant economic burden every year. (2021-02-10)

Signs of burnout can be detected in sweat
EPFL engineers, working in association with startup Xsensio, have developed a wearable system that can continually measure the concentration of cortisol - the stress hormone - in human sweat. Their device can eventually help doctors better understand and treat stress-related conditions like burnout and obesity. (2021-02-05)

New guidance on how cardiac patients with diabetes can exercise more safely
Cardiac patients who also have diabetes will be able to do their rehabilitation exercises more safely, thanks to the world's first guidance on the subject, which has been published by international experts including a Swansea University academic. The guidance will be a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, so they can help the growing number of cardiac rehabilitation patients who also have diabetes. (2021-02-04)

Study reveals how air pollution may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study has found a link between high levels of air pollution at an individual's home address and an elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Air pollution exposure appears to heighten the production of inflammatory cells in the bone marrow, triggering inflammation of the arteries. (2021-02-04)

Harvard researchers use machine learning models to study health impacts of walnuts
Researchers, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in collaboration with investigators from Rovira i Virgili University and the University of Navarra, Spain, used machine learning models, a subset of artificial intelligence, to identify more precisely the components in walnuts that may be responsible for potentially reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases - two of the leading causes of death in the U.S. (2021-02-02)

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care
The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, enabling rural primary care teams to improve cardiovascular health and optimizing emergency room use after clinic hours. (2021-02-01)

Study links intensive BP lowering to reduced CV risk in patients exposed to air pollution
In the study 'The Benefits of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Treatment According to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure' published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high levels of air pollution. (2021-02-01)

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk
Investigators teamed up to develop and evaluate a deep learning system that may help change this. The system automatically measures coronary artery calcium from CT scans to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about cardiovascular prevention. (2021-01-29)

Leading cardiovascular organizations call for urgent action to reduce air pollution
Air pollution is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Long-term exposure to air pollution has also been linked to an increased risk of death from COVID-19. This dangerous 'triple threat' of air pollution, COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease should be taken seriously, warn major health authorities. (2021-01-28)

Hypertension symptoms in women often mistaken for menopause
Pregnancy complications and early menopause increase women's future risk of heart disease. Cardiologists, gynaecologists and endocrinologists recommend how to help middle-aged women prevent later heart problems in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published today in European Heart Journal, a journal of the ESC. ''Physicians should intensify the detection of hypertension in middle-aged women,'' states the document. (2021-01-26)

Male breast cancer patients face high prevalence of heart disease risk factors
Male breast cancer patients were found to have a high prevalence of cardiovascular conditions, in a small study of this rare patient population presented at the American College of Cardiology's Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient Virtual course. (2021-01-25)

To ward off cancer and other diseases we need to change our lifestyle and focus on innovation
The key factor in preventing non-communicable diseases is lifestyle management at the individual level with a focus on such innovations, which can help increase the awareness of risk factors management in society, claim an international team of researchers, among them - scientists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania in a recent study. According to them, the management of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases requires many strategies from several perspectives and on different levels. (2021-01-25)

Risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1263, Yao Dong, Jun-E Liu and Ling Song from the Capital Medical University, Beijing, China consider risk factors for intraoperative pressure injury in aortic surgery. (2021-01-22)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

CVIA publishes selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC Conference
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, publishes selected abstracts from the 31st Great Wall International Cardiology (GW-ICC) Conference, October 19 - 25, 2020 Beijing, January 13, 2021: Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA), in its role as the official journal of the Great Wall International Cardiology Conference (GW-ICC), has published selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC. Abstracts are now online at https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cscript/cvia/2020/00000005/a00101s1/art00001 (2021-01-13)

New research reveals early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new Edith Cowan University led study has demonstrated. (2021-01-13)

Low fitness linked to higher psoriasis risk later in life
In a major register-based study, scientists at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 percent higher than for the fittest. (2021-01-12)

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. (2021-01-12)

Study finds new evidence of health threat from chemicals in marijuana and tobacco smoke
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have uncovered new evidence of the potential health risks of chemicals in tobacco and marijuana smoke. (2021-01-11)

Spikes in cardiovascular deaths shown to be an indirect cost of COVID-19 pandemic
In a new study from BIDMC, researchers analyzed data from the National Center for Health Statistics to compare the rate of cardiovascular-related deaths before and after the onset of the pandemic in the United States, relative to the same periods in the prior year. The observational study found that cardiovascular deaths unrelated to COVID-19 increased during the pandemic. (2021-01-11)

COVID-19 pandemic indirectly disrupted heart disease care
Deaths from ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States increased during the COVID-19 pandemic over the prior year, while globally, COVID-19 was associated with significant disruptions in cardiovascular disease testing. These findings are from two papers publishing in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the indirect effects of the pandemic on cardiovascular disease patients and their care. (2021-01-11)

Dual smoking and vaping doesn't cut cardiovascular risk: Boston University study
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with smoking cigarettes. But as use of e-cigarettes (''vaping'') becomes more popular, including as a way to cut back on cigarettes, little is known about its effect on cardiovascular health. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study, published in the journal Circulation, finds that vaping may not cut risk of cardiovascular disease in the way that most adults use them--in combination with cigarettes. (2021-01-06)

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