Current Careers News and Events

Current Careers News and Events, Careers News Articles.
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Age shall not weary them when it comes to discus and javelin
Discus and javelin throwers as well as marathon runners and race walkers are likely to achieve their best performances at a later age than sprinters, hurdlers and middle-distance runners. Why? It comes down to muscle fibres and technique. (2021-02-10)

Research indicates gender disparity in academic achievement and leadership positions
New research on gender inequality indicates that fewer leadership prospects in the workplace apply even to women who show the most promise early on in their academic careers. (2021-02-03)

Entrepreneurs benefit more from emotional intelligence than other competencies, such as IQ
Running a successful business has its challenges, but the COVID-19 pandemic has required many owners to pivot and look for new ways to operate profitably while keeping employees and consumers safe. Research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that emotional intelligence - the ability to understand, use and manage emotions to relieve stress - may be more vital to a business' survival than previously thought. (2021-01-28)

Fighting racial inequity by funding Black scientists
In a paper in Cell, a network of bioengineering academics review data on racial inequities in research funding, and suggest ways to address disparities in allocating support. (2021-01-26)

NHGRI proposes an action agenda for building a diverse genomics workforce
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has released a new action agenda for a diverse genomics workforce. This ambitious set of goals, objectives, and implementation strategies details NHGRI's plans for enhancing the diversity of the genomics workforce by 2030. (2021-01-07)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

Brain effects of repetitive low-level occupational blast exposure
Military and law enforcement personnel with extensive occupational blast exposure had statistically significant differences in brain imaging measures compared to nonexposed control personnel (2020-11-03)

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias
While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers. Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute physicist Ulrike Endesfelder, University of Stuttgart's Dirk Pflüger and Technische Universität Braunschweig's Timo de Wolff launched a Twitter campaign #StopPandemicBias, which aims to bring broader understanding to how COVID-19 will impact scientists (2020-07-28)

Pandemic disproportionately affects scientists with young children
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a disproportionate, negative impact on the careers of scientists with young children at home, a new survey finds. They have been forced to drastically reduce the amount of time they spend on their research, which could have long-term effects on their careers and could exacerbate existing inequalities. (2020-07-15)

Men more likely than women to be seen as brilliant
Men are more likely than are women to be seen as ''brilliant,'' finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly. (2020-07-02)

Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields. In new research, Kim Weeden, the Jan Rock Zubrow '77 Professor of the Social Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University, traces the discrepancy in college majors back to gender differences that emerge early in high school. (2020-07-02)

Kessler survey shows education paves the way to employment for youth with disabilities
The 2020 survey collected a wealth of information, including details of college majors and occupations, finding that students with disabilities were more likely to pursue career paths focused on helping people, and less likely to choose STEM majors, or to work in STEM disciplines. ''Preparing for STEM careers will help people with disabilities take advantage of this growth sector in our economy,'' said Dr. O'Neill. ''Research shows that this is a disparity that can be addressed with the right support system,'' he added. (2020-06-30)

Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement. (2020-06-18)

Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found. (2020-06-01)

Music and filmmaking can transform undergraduate student perceptions of dementia
Undergraduate arts and music departments may represent untapped resources for building up the workforce needed to care for older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2020-05-06)

A one-hour exercise early in college improves career outcomes for black students years later
A one-hour exercise designed to increase feelings of social belonging administered during the first year of college appears to significantly improve the lives and careers of black students up to 11 years later, psychologists report. (2020-04-29)

'Toxic,' but still successful professionally?
Toxic personality is a term used to describe people who behave greedily, immodestly and unfairly and take the truth very lightly. Dr. Mareike Kholin, Bastian Kückelhaus and Prof. Dr. Gerhard Blickle from the Department of Psychology at the University of Bonn found out why such people can still succeed in their careers. The trick that leads to the top is social skill. The results are presented online in advance in ''Personality and Individual Differences''. (2020-03-16)

Challenges and opportunities for women in physics
Women in the United States hold fewer than 25% of bachelor's degrees, 20% of doctoral degrees and 19% of faculty positions in physics. At the American Physical Society March Meeting in Denver, scientists will present unique approaches to engage women in science as they pursue their education and throughout every stage of their careers. (2020-02-27)

Study identifies way for employers to retain casual workers
Job enrichment may be an important tool for retaining seasonal frontline staff, according to a new University of Waterloo study. (2019-12-17)

Unveiling a new map that reveals the hidden personalities of jobs
It's been long been believed that different personalities align better with different jobs. Large-scale evidence now exists of the distinctive personality profiles that occur across occupations and how, using social media, they can be matched to an individual for the perfect fit. (2019-12-16)

Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers
A study co-authored by an SF State marketing professor finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace. (2019-11-27)

Why women select college majors with lower earnings potential
Even when both male and female college students say they want to pursue a major with the best earnings prospects, the majors men choose are higher paying than the majors women choose. (2019-11-25)

Scientists' panel urges vigorous prevention of sexual harassment and bias in labs
A diverse group of scientists including Nilanjana Dasgupta, professor of social psychology at UMass Amherst and the campus's director of faculty equity and inclusion, report their findings recently and recommendations on how institutions and funding agencies can address and prevent sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workforce. Details of their suggested ''specific, potentially high-impact policy changes'' appear in the current issue of Science. (2019-11-08)

Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias
In a policy paper published in the journal Science, scientists from a variety of fields highlight key ways institutions and funding agencies can help address sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workplace. (2019-11-07)

Survey suggests mentorship in medical school is vital to future of hematology
A survey of US hematology-oncology fellows suggests medical school plays an important role in shaping their interest in pursuing careers in hematology, particularly when students are exposed to hematology and oncology as part of core clerkships in internal medicine and pediatrics. (2019-10-31)

Bad behavior between moms driven by stereotypes, judgment
Mothers are often their own toughest critics, but new Iowa State University research shows they judge other mothers just as harshly. According to the results -- which build upon previous work identifying seven stereotypes of mothers -- ideal and lazy mothers drew the most contempt from both working and stay-at-home mothers. The overworked stay-at-home mom also was near the top of the list. (2019-10-09)

NYU scholar makes recommendations to end disparities in stem for English learners
In her latest research article, published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), NYU Professor Okhee Lee provides recommendations to support a federal mandate in the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 which requires that English language proficiency standards align with content standards. (2019-10-08)

Science proves that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger
Through advanced data analysis, researchers have established a causal relationship between failure and future success. (2019-10-01)

Gender discrimination holding women back in veterinary practice
Research by Lancaster University Management School and Open University Business School shows women face discrimination and occupy fewer places in the higher reaches of the veterinary profession, even as they begin to outnumber men in the field. (2019-09-06)

Children and partners are key
Fewer children, distant relatives or friends, and an increasing plurality of family models: These factors impact on the availability of support and care in old age. Tiziana Nazio, a researcher at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, has explored how early family formation events relate to the emotional and practical support that people give and receive in older age. (2019-09-05)

Hiring committees that don't believe in gender bias promote fewer women
Is gender bias in hiring really a thing? Opinions vary, but a new study by a UBC psychologist and researchers in France reveals that hiring committees who denied it's a problem were less likely to promote women. (2019-08-26)

Doing more with less: Flexible, reduced-load jobs a win-win for workers, employers
A Purdue University professor is researching reduced-load work options to help provide benefits for professionals and companies. (2019-08-01)

How to improve care for patients with disabilities? We need more providers like them
When it comes to patients with disabilities, the chance of getting a clinician 'like them' is extremely low, which may lead to patients' reluctance to seek care or follow prescribed interventions and treatments. Meanwhile, without adequate scientists with disabilities bringing perspectives to patient-centered research, the ability to improve care for patients with disabilities is limited. (2019-06-10)

Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business
Mathematicians from Queen Mary University of London have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead. (2019-06-04)

Creativity is not just for the young, study finds
If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. A new study of winners of the Nobel Prize in economics finds that there are two different life cycles of creativity, one that hits some people early in their career and another that more often strikes later in life. (2019-04-26)

Research finds pregnant women feel pushed out of their jobs
Florida State University researcher Samantha Paustian-Underdahl found pregnant women experienced decreased encouragement in the workplace to return to their jobs after pregnancy. (2019-04-18)

Endocrine Society celebrates International Women's Day with special thematic issue
The Endocrine Society is commemorating International Women's day with its March 2019 Woman in Endocrinology Collection, a special online thematic issue of peer-reviewed journal articles. (2019-03-08)

Parenthood contributes to gender imbalance in STEM employment, but it's not just an issue for mother
Nearly half of new moms and a quarter of new dads leave their full-time STEM jobs after they have their first child, according to a new study. (2019-02-18)

Study: Immigrant kids deliberately build STEM skills
US immigrant children study more math and science in high school and college, which leads to their greater presence in STEM careers, according to new findings from scholars at Duke University and Stanford University. (2019-01-08)

Over half of UK female surgeons have experience of workplace discrimination, poll suggests
More than half of female surgeons in the UK have faced or witnessed discrimination in the workplace, suggest the results of a confidential online poll, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-01-07)

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