Current Caregivers News and Events

Current Caregivers News and Events, Caregivers News Articles.
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Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

New report calls for universal coverage of long-term care for older adults in U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic's heavy toll on older Americans highlights the need to strengthen the nation's safety net for people in need of long-term services and supports, according to a new report published by Milbank Quarterly. The report proposes a system of universal coverage to support the long-term care of all older Americans. (2021-02-18)

'Smart' asthma inhaler sensors improve pediatric asthma control
Sensor-based inhalers integrated into health care providers' clinical workflows may help improve medication adherence and support children with asthma - and their families - to more effectively manage this condition, according to a new Northwestern and Lurie Children's study published in Pediatrics. (2021-02-17)

Ageism and sexism barring grandmothers from initiatives to save newborn lives in Global South
Ageism, sexism, and Western ideals of the nuclear family have excluded grandmothers from national and international policy initiatives to save newborn lives in the Global South, suggests an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2021-02-15)

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers as newborns and remember them after up to 100 days apart--although they prefer unfamiliar mouse mothers as adults. (2021-01-26)

Special interests can be assets for youth with autism
COLUMBIA, Mo. - When he was in middle school, teachers would give Sam Curran a list of words to type in a computer to practice his vocabulary. (2021-01-15)

ADA lowers target HbA1C levels for children with type-1 diabetes
In early 2020, upon recommendation by leading endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association lowered the target hemoglobin A1C guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Their goal in recommending stricter glucose control was to ensure children with type 1 diabetes have better immediate and long-term health outcomes with fewer health complications and reduced mortality rates. In this ''Perspective'' article they discuss the evidence and rationale behind this new recommendation. (2021-01-14)

Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. (2021-01-12)

Impact of COVID-19 on children with disabilities, caregivers and healthcare providers
Pediatric rehabilitation experts assess the impact of the pandemic on pediatric rehabilitation patients and the increasing use of telemedicine and provide insights and recommendations for mitigating the impact of the virus, in this special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine (2021-01-04)

The true cost of chemotherapy
New research reveals the non-healthcare costs of chemotherapy for breast cancer patients. It includes the cost of lost productivity, work absence, and 'out-of-pocket' personal costs such as paying for transport and parking for treatment, the cost of wigs and new bras, and over the counter medications. The research team say that better targeting of treatment could help avoid placing unnecessary costs upon patients, their caregivers and wider society. (2021-01-04)

Research uses a video game to identify attention deficit symptoms
Adapting a traditional endless runner video game and using a raccoon as the protagonist, researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM, in its Spanish acronym), among other institutions, have developed a platform that allows the identification and evaluation of the degree of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. (2020-12-21)

Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support. They recommend future guidelines unify their messages and be better supported by scholarly data. (2020-12-17)

Report identifies critical gaps and research opportunities for improved cancer care
A new report finds that despite progress in the decline of cancer mortality, there are still critical gaps including the need to develop better tools and explore research opportunities that would lead to limiting cancer as a major health concern. (2020-12-16)

Moffitt program bringing patients, scientists together infuses new meaning into research
Because they spend most of their time in their labs, basic science researchers rarely get to meet the patients who benefit most from their work. A group at Moffitt Cancer Center decided to change that, and with the creation of the Patient Researcher Forum, the cancer center has found a way for researchers and patients to engage with each other. (2020-12-14)

Caregiver burden in dementia during the COVID19 crisis
Caregivers of people with dementia and milder forms of neurocognitive disorder bear a heavy burden. They are constantly confronted with challenging symptoms and behaviors and feel they are up against their limits. The latest results from a study indicate that the COVID 19 crisis affects this burden since the pandemic has mental health implications (2020-12-07)

People returning home from skilled nursing facilities need tailored instructions
Transitions from a skilled nursing facility to home are burdensome to already vulnerable individuals and are points in time where errors and gaps in care are more likely. COVID-19 has exacerbated transitional challenges, which can affect quality of life and cause the patient to lose progress made during their stay at a care facility. (2020-12-02)

Understanding quality of life for caregivers of persons with traumatic brain injury
New research uses a unique survey tool to understand how caring for a person with TBI impacts the caregiver's mental health and well-being. (2020-12-02)

Engaging family caregivers key to coordinated home health care
After Jo-Ana Chase heard her mother had successful heart surgery, she was relieved when her mom was finally discharged from the hospital and sent home to be cared for by her brother. (2020-12-01)

NTU Singapore study suggests self-determination as key to avoid caregiver burden
A Singapore study of family caregivers of the terminally ill suggests that self-determination is the key factor that can protect them from caregiver burden -- a negative state impacting a carer's wellbeing. (2020-12-01)

Exploring links between infant vocabulary size and vocal interactions with caregivers
Analysis of recordings from infants' homes reveals that certain types of vocal interactions between adults and infants are associated with a larger infant vocabulary. Lukas Lopez of University of California, Merced, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on November 25. (2020-11-25)

New ALS guideline establishes national standard for managing neurodegenerative disease
The first Canadian guideline for the care and management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- Lou Gehrig's disease -- recommends a patient-focused approach, with attention to holistic and emotional aspects of well-being. The guideline, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191721, is intended for ALS clinicians, allied health professionals and primary care providers, and contains an easy-to-reference table with comprehensive recommendations. (2020-11-16)

Efforts needed to better integrate family caregivers into health care teams
An estimated 53 million family members and friends provide care assistance to loved ones in the United States, yet family caregivers face significant barriers coordinating their efforts with the formal health care team. A new study suggests changes the health care system can make to better integrate family members into the health care team. (2020-11-10)

Costs to informal carers for people in the last three months of life are larger than those to formal
Findings from an international study into the costs and outcomes of informal end of life care have today been published BMC Medicine. (2020-11-05)

Standardized measures needed to screen kinship foster placements
New research is proposing a novel screening tool to assess the quality of care in kinship foster care placement settings. Kinship caregiving--placing a child in a relative's home if the child cannot safely stay in the family home--is becoming more common and is a preferred option for children, says UBC Okanagan Assistant Professor Sarah Dow-Fleisner. (2020-10-29)

More than half of American adults with advanced MS report mistreatment by caregivers
Four in 10 people with advanced multiple sclerosis, or MS, are emotionally abused by someone responsible for caring for them, reports a study led by the University of California, Riverside. Further, the study finds one quarter are financially exploited, one in six are neglected, one in nine are battered, and one in 12 are sexually assaulted by a caregiver. (2020-10-27)

Report calls for easing access, improving home health for older adults
Older adults have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased risk of severe illness and death reported across the globe. A new report argues that one policy change made during the pandemic should remain in place after the novel coronavirus virus fades away: better access to home health services through Medicare. In a set of recommendations published by the Commonwealth Fund, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Duke University argue for regulatory changes to expand the Medicare home health benefit. (2020-10-22)

The 'Goldilocks Day': the perfect day for kids' bone health
Not too little, not too much - Goldilocks' 'just right' approach can now assess children's daily activities as new research from the University of South Australia confirms the best make up of a child's day to maximise bone health and function in children. (2020-10-19)

'Rare' brain disorder may not be so rare anymore, trends in japan reveal
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is an important cause of dementia. However, long-term trends in CJD-associated mortality and incidence rates in Japan have not been fully studied until now. Now, scientists conducted a detailed analysis that uncovered that the CJD-associated death and incidence rates almost doubled from 2005-2014. They predict that the burden of CJD would continue to rise in the current hyper-aging era. These findings can help policymakers plan and strategize effectively. (2020-10-19)

Brain injury survivors and their caregivers can benefit from a resiliency program
An early resiliency intervention program for survivors of acute brain injury and their caregivers has shown clinically significant improvement in emotional distress, according to a study conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). The program achieved measurable reductions in depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress among individuals with acute neurologic illness who had been hospitalized in the intensive care unit, and their caregivers. (2020-10-14)

Improving health care autonomy for young adults with autism
Independence has always been a driving force in Nancy Cheak-Zamora's life. Now an associate professor at the University of Missouri School of Health Professions, she grew up undiagnosed with dyslexia, a learning disorder that can lead to difficulty reading. (2020-10-14)

Dementia caregivers' stress leads to sleep deprivation
New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found 94 per cent of Australians caring for a loved one with dementia are sleep deprived. This can potentially lead to poor health of the carer and may also impact on their ability to provide care for the person living with dementia. (2020-10-01)

Hospital-based specialist palliative care may slightly improve patient experience and increase their chances of dying in their preferred place (measured by home death)
A Cochrane Review into the effectiveness of hospital-based specialist palliative care has found evidence that when compared to usual care, it may slightly improve patient satisfaction and depression, and increase the chances of patients dying in their preferred place (measured by home death). (2020-09-30)

Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective
Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children's Health indicates. The finding, published online this month in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, could help expand access to specialists and reduce barriers to care, particularly as the popularity of telemedicine grows during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-09-24)

Caregiving factors may affect hospitalization risk among disabled older adults
Few studies have investigated the potential impact of caregivers and caregiver factors on older adults' likelihood of being hospitalized. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society has now provided some insights. (2020-09-23)

For black girls, attitudes about being black affect risk of depression
A new study suggests that the messages Black girls hear at home about being Black, and about being Black women in particular, can affect their risk of exhibiting the symptoms of depression. (2020-09-22)

Awareness of COVID-19 in severe dementia patients
Tokyo, September 21, 2020- The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially affected patients with dementia and their caregivers. (2020-09-21)

Researchers show how AI-controlled sensors could save lives in 'smart' hospitals and homes
Interdisciplinary researchers nationwide are developing AI systems that would go into hospital rooms and elder care homes, to weave 'ambient intelligence' into the places where health care is delivered in order to avoid fatal medical errors and improve therapeutic outcomes. (2020-09-09)

Study underscores value of down syndrome clinic to you program
A new software program effectively brings the expertise of Massachusetts General Hospital specialists to many more patients with Down syndrome. (2020-09-08)

Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia -- and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new University of Michigan study found. (2020-09-02)

Study highlights keys to helping dads be there for kids when they don't have custody
A recent study highlights several factors that play key roles in determining the extent to which fathers who don't have custody are involved in their children's lives - specifically in cases where the children are in ''kinship care.'' (2020-08-31)

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