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Mental health and the COVID-19 pandemic: A call for action
The inclusion of mental health as part of national public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic is mandatory in assisting all those in need. (2020-08-30)

New palliative care model shown to reduce costs without compromising on quality of care
Findings from a large-scale clinical trial testing a new palliative care model have shown to be lower cost, viewed positively by patients and their carers while showing no difference in patient-reported outcomes when compared with standard care. (2020-08-28)

These drugs carry risks and may not help, but many dementia patients get them anyway
Nearly three-quarters of older adults with dementia have filled prescriptions for medicines that act on their brain and nervous system, but aren't designed for dementia, a new study shows. That's despite the special risks that such drugs carry for older adults -- and the lack of evidence that they actually ease the dementia-related behavior problems that often prompt a doctor's prescription in patients with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. (2020-08-18)

Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning
A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. The findings, which were published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, suggest health care providers should screen children for sleep problems at every age and intervene early when a sleep problem is identified. (2020-08-03)

Pediatric experts offer tips for children's mental health in transition back to school
In a recent survey of school-aged parents conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital, 2 out of 5 parents said that they had concerns about their child's social and emotional wellbeing as they head back to school. Concerns about transitioning back to school will be different depending on the age of a child. (2020-07-29)

Research raises concerns about firearm access for people with dementia
Today, new research released from faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus looked at how caregivers address the issues of firearm safety when taking care of someone who has Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) and has access to a gun. The findings published today in JAMA Network Open. (2020-07-15)

Mismatched caregiver-infant interactions during feeding could boost babies' risk of later obesity
A new integrative review examined evidence related to infants' self-regulation of behavior and emotion, and how that relates to interactions when they are fed by their caregivers, including how those interactions may derail infants' ability to regulate their intake of food. The review found that infants who are fed in the absence of hunger or beyond fullness may develop skewed perceptions of hunger and fullness, which could increase their risk of obesity and related health problems later in life. (2020-07-14)

Family caregiving may not harm health of caregivers after all
For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help. (2020-07-13)

Community and law enforcement partnerships best help kids who witness home violence
The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. (2020-07-08)

America's political future will be shaped by aging, journal indicates
The latest issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America shows how aging is reshaping politics today in unprecedented ways, and how it will continue to do so for years to come. (2020-06-25)

Telemedicine effective for monitoring patients in large pediatric neurology network
As the COVID-19 pandemic sent entire communities into lockdown, doctors quickly adopted telehealth strategies without knowing whether they would be effective or feasible. Now, a new study from the Division of Neurology at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) shows that for pediatric neurology care, the transition was very successful even in a short period of time and may provide guidance on the future of pediatric care after the pandemic subsides. (2020-06-09)

Educational video may assist with decision to pursue hospice at the end of life for cancer patients
An educational video about hospice care can provide valuable information for patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers, improve perceptions of this quality form of care at the end of life, and increase its use. These are the findings of a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-06-08)

Spirituality linked to higher quality of life for stroke survivors, caregivers
Higher spirituality was strongly linked to better quality of life for stroke survivors and their caregivers. The study emphasizes the importance of caring for stroke survivors holistically, as an individual with emotional needs and part of an interdependent unit with their caregivers. (2020-05-26)

Overcoming challenges of individuals with autism during the COVID-19 pandemic
Dr. Adrien Eshraghi and Miller School coauthors published a new correspondence titled COVID-19: overcoming the challenges faced by individuals with autism and their families in The Lancet Psychiatry. In this commentary, the authors address specific challenges patients with autism and their families might encounter during the pandemic, as well as what healthcare providers should know and do to ensure optimal and safe care. (2020-05-20)

MSK kids study: Children with cancer are not at a higher risk for COVID-19 infection or morbidity
Researches from MSK Kids at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) found that children with cancer are not at a higher risk of being affected by COVID-19. (2020-05-13)

Adolescence is ruff for dogs too
The study, headed by Dr Lucy Asher from Newcastle University, is the first to find evidence of adolescent behavior in dogs. (2020-05-12)

Healthy eating behaviors in childhood may reduce the risk of adult obesity and heart disease
Encouraging children to make their own decisions about food, within a structured environment focused on healthy food choices, has been linked to better childhood nutrition and healthier lifelong eating behaviors. Parents and caregivers can play a significant role in creating an environment that helps children develop healthier eating behaviors early in life, which can reduce the risk for overweight, obesity and cardiovascular disease as adults. (2020-05-11)

Non-fatal injuries cost US $1,590 and 11 days off work per injured employee every year
Non-fatal injuries in the US add up to an estimated $1,590 and an average of 11 days off work per injured employee every year, indicates an analysis of medical insurance claims and productivity data, published online in the journal Injury Prevention. (2020-05-04)

Two new AHA statements focus on heart failure: How social determinants can affect outcomes; impact on caregivers
Adverse social factors, such as insurance status, food insecurity, lack of funds for medication and others, may lead to worse heart failure outcomes. Caregiving by family and friends of people with heart failure is increasingly complicated, is progressively more challenging and takes a financial, physical and emotional toll on caregivers. (2020-04-30)

New tool measures quality of life in people with dementia
University of Queensland researchers say a new tool to measure of the quality of life of people with dementia will result in better targeted care for those living with the condition. (2020-04-26)

New systematic review captures what makes a positive post-birth experience for new mothers
A new qualitative systematic review conducted to inform the scope of a new World Health Organization (WHO) post-birth (postnatal) guideline identifies four clear themes for a positive experience in mothers across 15 different countries and cultures, according to a study published April 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kenneth Finlayson, research associate at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), UK, and colleagues. (2020-04-22)

New tool helps predict risk of death, admission to long-term care for people with dementia
A new tool that predicts risk of death and admission to a long-term care facility for patients with dementia may help conversations between health care providers, patients and their families, according to new research in CMAJ. (2020-04-20)

NCCN patient guidelines listed among top global sources for trustworthy online information
A recently-published, independent, peer-reviewed, international study in Current Urology measured reliability and transparency of online medical information for people with prostate cancer and their caregivers, and found the NCCN Guidelines for Patients to be one of the most trustworthy resources. (2020-04-20)

Alarming abusive head trauma revealed in computational simulation impact study
Abusive head trauma (AHT), like that of Shaken Baby Syndrome, is the leading cause of fatal brain injuries in children under two. While children can suffer permanent neurological damage, developmental delay, and disability, the long-term effects of AHT are difficult to diagnose and predict. Now, researchers at New York Institute of Technology have developed computational simulations to help clinicians and caregivers better understand the impact of these injuries. (2020-04-09)

First mobile app for caregivers of children with FASD reaches trial stage
In the summer of 2017, a group of University of Rochester researchers teamed up to create the first mobile phone app for caregivers of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Tthe app has now reached the trial stage. (2020-04-08)

Caring for seniors during COVID-19 pandemic
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine scientist Kathleen Unroe, MD, MHA, and colleagues lay out guidelines and best practices for healthcare providers and family caregivers who are providing care for older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their recommendations are published in the Journal of Geriatric Emergency Medicine. (2020-03-31)

Exercise reduces caregiver's burden in dementia care
Exercise in older adults, even at an advanced stage of dementia, is an important strategy to maintain independence in everyday living and to promote quality of life. (2020-03-30)

Do ER caregivers' on-the-job emotions affect patient care?
Doctors and nurses in emergency departments at four academic centers and four community hospitals in the Northeast reported a wide range of emotions triggered by patients, hospital resources and societal factors, according to a qualitative study led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst social psychologist. (2020-03-28)

Where you live may influence your baby's behavior
Infants from rural families tend to display negative emotions such as anger and frustration more frequently than their urban counterparts, according to a recent study in the Journal of Community Psychology. Babies born in big cities, on the other hand, typically are less fussy and not as bothered by limits set by their caregivers. (2020-03-18)

Overlooked caregivers? Children, teens help care for parents with ALS
Children and teens with family members with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, help with bathing, dressing, eating and all types of caregiving activities, yet they may not have training or enough information about the disease, according to a study published in the March 18, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-03-18)

New research shows children and teens worry about political issues
A new psychological study suggests that children and teens are worried about political issues, though it's unclear that children's and teens' worry is a cause for concern, or that it is interfering with their mental health functioning. (2020-03-10)

Self-help groups empower caregivers of children with disabilities
Caregivers in low-income settings will be able to respond to the challenges of bringing up children with disabilities, thanks to a new model created by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). (2020-03-10)

Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism
Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These actions can result from the child being denied attention or access to items they enjoy, as well as from internal discomfort or environmental stressors such as noise or large crowds. (2020-03-04)

ADDF statement on the USPSTF Evidence Report on screening for cognitive impairment
The latest US Preventive Services Task Force evidence report on screening for cognitive impairment in older adults raises many questions, but provides few answers for healthcare providers, patients, and families. (2020-02-26)

Study finds gender disparities in hematology research success
Hematologists who complete a mentored training program experience greater levels of academic success than those who do not; however, a study published today in Blood Advances suggests a slight discrepancy in success levels between male and female hematologists. (2020-02-25)

Experts map future of family caregiving research
A new supplemental issue of the journal The Gerontologist from The Gerontological Society of America shares 10 research priorities to better support the needs of family caregivers. (2020-02-23)

Social factors play a key role in missed well-child care visits
Despite the benefits of well-child care visits (WCV), up to half of WCVs are missed. A team of researchers and pediatricians at Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Washington, and the University of Vermont sought to understand the challenges that prevent families from attending their child's scheduled appointment. (2020-02-18)

Palliative vs. standard care for Parkinson's disease
This randomized clinical trial that included 210 patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders and 175 caregivers examined whether outpatient palliative care was associated with better patient or caregiver outcomes compared with standard care. (2020-02-10)

Family dynamics may influence suicidal thoughts in children
Research from Washington University in St. Louis shows a nontrivial rate of children as young as 9- and 10- years old are thinking about suicide. How their families interact -- or don't -- may play a role. (2020-02-07)

Self-care linked to greater confidence in parents of children with FASD
Children diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) -- caused by prenatal alcohol exposure -- often face lifelong developmental, cognitive and behavioral problems. But the children are not the only ones who struggle; often their parents and caretakers do, too. A new study by University of Rochester researchers examines how FASD caregivers' perceived confidence in and the frequency of self-care is related to stress, parenting attitudes, and family needs. (2020-02-04)

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