Current Carnegie Institution News and Events

Current Carnegie Institution News and Events, Carnegie Institution News Articles.
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Reserve prices under scarcity conditions improve with a dynamic ORDC, new research finds
A new paper quantifies how better accounting for the temperature-dependent probability of large generator contingencies with time-varying dynamic ORDC construction improves reserve procurement. The paper, 'Dynamic Operating Reserve Procurement Improves Scarcity Pricing in PJM,' by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, was published in Energy Policy. (2021-02-16)

Switching to firm contracts may prevent natural gas fuel shortages at US power plants
New research now indicates that these fuel shortages are not due to failures of pipelines and that in certain areas of the country a change in how gas is purchased can significantly reduce generator outages. The paper, 'What Causes Natural Gas Fuel Shortages at US Power Plants?' by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the North American Electric Reliability Corporation, was published in Energy Policy. (2021-02-16)

Electric transmission operators could benefit from temperature-dependent resource adequacy modeling
A new paper contributes to these ongoing reliability considerations by using a unique data set to determine how both low and high temperatures reduce the reliability of coal, gas, diesel, hydroelectric, and nuclear power generators and thus affect the amount of generation markets should contract for. The paper, ''Resource Adequacy Implications of Temperature-dependent Electric Generator Availability,'' by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, was published in Applied Energy. (2021-02-12)

A plant's nutrient-sensing abilities can modulate its response to environmental stress
Understanding how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions is crucial to developing effective strategies for protecting important agricultural crops from a changing climate. New research led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang, Shouling, Xu, and Yang Bi reveals an important process by which plants switch between amplified and dampened stress responses. (2021-02-11)

Astronomers confirm solar system's most distant known object is indeed Farfarout
With the help of the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab, and other ground-based telescopes, astronomers have confirmed that a faint object discovered in 2018 and nicknamed ''Farfarout'' is indeed the most distant object yet found in our Solar System. The object has just received its designation from the International Astronomical Union. (2021-02-11)

The politics of synonyms
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of the journal PLOS. (2021-02-11)

Astronomers confirm orbit of most distant object ever observed in our solar system
A team of astronomers, including associate professor Chad Trujillo of Northern Arizona University's Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science, have confirmed a planetoid that is almost four times farther from the Sun than Pluto, making it the most distant object ever observed in our solar system. (2021-02-10)

Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia
The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. A study led by Chapman University's Kenjiro Quides tested the boundaries of this relationship -- and found that it's not always as perfectly harmonious as previously thought. Reported in the journal Evolution, the results suggest a hidden conflict in the symbiotic relationship and provides support for the conclusion that rhizobia have an evolutionary advantage. (2021-02-10)

'Farfarout'! Solar system's most distant planetoid confirmed
Astronomers have confirmed a planetoid that is almost four times farther from the Sun than Pluto, making it the most distant object ever observed in our solar system. (2021-02-10)

Super-Earth atmospheres probed at Sandia's Z machine
Sandia National Laboratorie' Z machine has replicated the gravitational pressures on so-called ''super-Earths'' to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life. Astronomers believe that super-Earths -- collections of rocks up to eight times larger than Earth -- exist in the millions in our galaxy. ''The question before us is whether any of these super planets are actually Earthlike, with active geological processes, atmospheres and magnetic fields,'' said Sandia physicist Joshua Townsend. The researchers found seven. (2021-02-09)

Making good decisions about COVID-19
In their article, Rode and Fischbeck note that many of the key decisions facing individuals, corporations and governments all depend on two basic values: the probability a person has the virus and the probability that person transmits the virus. (2021-02-09)

Can super-Earth interior dynamics set the table for habitability?
New research led by Carnegie's Yingwei Fei provides a framework for understanding the interiors of super-Earths--rocky exoplanets between 1.5 and 2 times the size of our home planet--which is a prerequisite to assess their potential for habitability. Planets of this size are among the most abundant in exoplanetary systems. (2021-02-09)

Don't let pressure of one-upmanship dictate your gift selection
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon's Tepper School of Business and West Virginia University's John Chambers College of Business and Economics set out to understand gift giving dynamics in these settings and how a giver's and a recipient's evaluation of the giver's gift is influenced by the other gifts the recipient receives. (2021-02-01)

Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials
An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys. This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The new materials could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient. (2021-01-29)

By changing their shape, some bacteria can grow more resilient to antibiotics
New research led by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Shiladitya Banerjee demonstrates how certain types of bacteria can adapt to long-term exposure to antibiotics by changing their shape. (2021-01-29)

NSU researcher part of team studying impact of rising sea temperatures on marine life
Global warming or climate change. It doesn't matter what you call it. What matters is that right now it is having a direct and dramatic effect on marine environments across our planet. (2021-01-26)

Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees. (2021-01-12)

Detecting COVID-19 antibodies in 10-12 seconds
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University report findings on an advanced nanomaterial-based biosensing platform that detects, within seconds, antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to testing, the platform will help to quantify patient immunological response to the new vaccines with precision. (2021-01-08)

When Uber and Lyft enter cities, vehicle ownership increases
When ridesourcing companies Uber and Lyft show up in urban areas, vehicle registrations per capita increase by 0.7% on average, increasing even more in car-dependent cities. Researchers made this discovery by analyzing data from major US cities between 2011 to 2017, comparing trends in cities where Uber and Lyft entered with those where they didn't. They also found that Uber and Lyft displace transit more in cities with higher income and fewer children. (2021-01-06)

Chemists describe a new form of ice
Scientists from the United States, China, and Russia have described the structure and properties of a novel hydrogen clathrate hydrate that forms at room temperature and relatively low pressure. Hydrogen hydrates are a potential solution for hydrogen storage and transportation, the most environmentally friendly fuel. (2020-12-22)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

CRISPR helps researchers uncover how corals adjust to warming oceans
The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system can help scientists understand, and possibly improve, how corals respond to the environmental stresses of climate change. Work led by Phillip Cleves--who joined Carnegie's Department of Embryology this fall--details how the revolutionary, Nobel Prize-winning technology can be deployed to guide conservation efforts for fragile reef ecosystems. (2020-12-21)

Scientists and philosopher team up, propose a new way to categorize minerals
Minerals are the most durable, information-rich objects we can study to understand our planet's origin and evolution. However, the current classification system leaves unanswered questions for planetary scientists, geobiologists, paleontologists and others who strive to understand minerals' historical context. A new evolutionary approach to classifying minerals complements the existing protocols and offers the opportunity to rigorously document Earth's history. (2020-12-21)

Infrastructure key to balancing climate and economic goals in developing countries
Developing nations have an opportunity to avoid long-term dependence on fossil fuel-burning infrastructure as they move toward economic stability, even if they are slow to cut carbon emissions, say the authors of a new paper. Countries with low per capita incomes can keep their contributions to global warming to 0.3 degrees Celsius with careful foresight and planning, urge Carnegie's Lei Duan and Ken Caldeira with Juan Moreno-Cruz of the University of Waterloo. (2020-12-16)

Most-distant galaxy helps elucidate the early universe
New work from an international team of astronomers improves our understanding of the most-distant known astrophysical object-- GN-z11, a galaxy 13.4 billion light-years from Earth. (2020-12-16)

Balancing climate and development goals
The impact on climate change would only be modest if countries in the process of development were to delay efforts to reduce their carbon emissions until they reach a certain level of economic growth. (2020-12-15)

Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals--including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds--follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology. (2020-12-11)

New-found phenomenon that may improve hurricane forecasts
2020 Was a Year Like No Other - and That Goes for the Hurricane Season, Too! NSU Researchers Headed up a Team Working to Better Forecast Storms, Which Can Really Help During a Pandemic (2020-12-09)

Cluster of Alaskan islands could be single, interconnected giant volcano
small group of volcanic islands in Alaska's Aleutian chain might be part of a single, undiscovered giant volcano, say scientists presenting the findings Monday, 7 December at AGU's Fall Meeting 2020. If the researchers' suspicions are correct, the newfound volcanic caldera would belong to the same category of volcanoes as the Yellowstone Caldera and other volcanoes that have had super-eruptions with severe global consequences. (2020-12-03)

Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow. Just-published research details how an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs, taking the place of coral that was damaged by extreme storms and exacerbating the damage caused by ocean acidification, disease, pollution, and bleaching. (2020-11-30)

A route for avoiding defects during additive manufacturing
Research published in Science reveals how pores form during metals additive manufacturing and become defects trapped in solidifying metal. The practical value of this research is that it can inform industry on how to predict and improve 3D printing processes. (2020-11-26)

Scientists defy nature to make insta-bling at room temperature
An international team of scientists has defied nature to make diamonds in minutes in a laboratory at room temperature - a process that normally requires billions of years, huge amounts of pressure and super-hot temperatures. (2020-11-17)

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles
Scientists have reported a new optical imaging technology, using a glass side covered with gold nanodiscs that allows them to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the characteristics of nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. (2020-11-16)

New technique extends next-generation lithium metal batteries
Columbia Engineering researchers have found that alkali metal additives, such as potassium ions, can prevent lithium microstructure proliferation during battery use. They used a combination of microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and computational modeling to discover that adding small amounts of potassium salt to a conventional lithium battery electrolyte produces unique chemistry at the lithium/electrolyte interface, and modulates degradation during battery operation, preventing the growth of microstructures and leading to safer, longer lasting batteries. (2020-11-04)

First light on a next-gen astronomical survey toward a new understanding of the cosmos
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's fifth generation collected its very first observations of the cosmos at 1:47 a.m. on October 24, 2020. As the world's first all-sky time-domain spectroscopic survey, SDSS-V will provide groundbreaking insight into the formation and evolution of galaxies--like like our own Milky Way--and of the supermassive black holes that lurk at their centers. (2020-11-02)

Where were Jupiter and Saturn born?
New work reveals the likely original locations of Saturn and Jupiter. These findings refine our understanding of the forces that determined our Solar System's unusual architecture, including the ejection of an additional planet between Saturn and Uranus, ensuring that only small, rocky planets, like Earth, formed inward of Jupiter. (2020-10-29)

Modern computational tools may open a new era for fossil pollen research
By integrating machine-learning technology with high-resolution imaging, scientists are improving the taxonomic resolution of fossil pollen identifications and greatly enhancing the use of pollen data in ecological and evolutionary research. (2020-10-26)

Australian research shows NASA's James Webb telescopes will reveal hidden galaxies
Simulations show it's possible to distinguish host galaxy from quasars, although still challenging due to the galaxy's small size on the sky. (2020-10-15)

Phosphate polymer forms a cornerstone of metabolic control
In a changing climate, understanding how organisms respond to stress conditions is increasingly important. New work could enable scientists to engineer the metabolism of organisms to be more resilient and productive in a range of environments. Their research focuses on polyphosphate, an energy-rich polymer of tens to hundreds phosphate groups which is conserved in all kingdoms of life and is integral to many cellular activities, including an organism's ability to respond to changing environmental conditions. (2020-10-15)

Quality control mechanism closes the protein production 'on-ramps'
Recent work revealed a newfound quality control system in the protein production assembly line with possible implications for understanding neurogenerative disease. (2020-10-08)

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