Current Cartilage News and Events

Current Cartilage News and Events, Cartilage News Articles.
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In-silico modelling helps with the integrated study of the intervertebral disc in health and disease
Published in the journal Bioinformatics and conducted entirely by members of the BCN MedTech Research Unit, with Laura Baumgartner as first author under the guidance of Jérôme Noailly. (2021-02-05)

Tiny sensor technique reveals cellular forces involved in tissue generation
A team of Brown University researchers developed a technique that uses tiny polymer spheres to sense the forces at play as body tissue forms and grows. (2021-02-05)

'Smart' cartilage cells programmed to release drugs when stressed
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have engineered cartilage cells to release an anti-inflammatory drug in response to stresses such cells undergo when they are compressed during weight bearing and movement. (2021-01-27)

Cartilage matrix as natural biomaterial for cartilage regeneration
A working group at MedUni Vienna develops strategies for regeneration of articular cartilage and has found that natural cartilage matrix is suitable as a biomaterial for improved cartilage regeneration. (2021-01-20)

Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain (2021-01-15)

Neither 'meniscal' nor 'mechanical' symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these ''meniscal'' and ''mechanical'' symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-14)

Shriners Hospitals for Children study reveals new link to arthritis
A new study by investigators at the Shriners Hospital for Children -- St. Louis suggests the damaging effects of obesity are not due to body weight but rather come from something much smaller - biochemical signals released by fat cells. (2021-01-08)

Embryonic development in a petri dish
3D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos (2020-12-10)

Autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: M-ACI has comparable benefit to therapy alternative
Only matrix-induced ACI (M-ACI) shows a benefit that is at least comparable to that of therapy alternatives. This was not shown for other ACI procedures. (2020-12-04)

Not just lizards - alligators can regrow their tails too
A team of researchers from Arizona State University and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries have uncovered that young alligators have the ability to regrow their tails up to three-quarters of a foot, or 18% of their total body length. (2020-11-23)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Racket sports may worsen knee arthritis
Racket sports like tennis and racquetball appear to accelerate knee joint degeneration in overweight people with osteoarthritis, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). (2020-11-17)

New research reveals potential treatment to delay and manage osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis (OA), a widely acknowledged cause of disability that affects patients' quality of life and has significant economic impact through healthcare costs and loss of earnings. In a novel study researchers have identified cytoplasmic localized histone deacetalyse 6 (HDAC6) as a promising therapeutic target to postpone development of and possibly treat OA using the HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin A. They report their results in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. (2020-11-12)

WFIRM scientists create hybrid tissue construct for cartilage regeneration
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have developed a method to bioprint a type of cartilage that could someday help restore knee function damaged by arthritis or injury. (2020-11-09)

A novel finding on Kabuki syndrome, a rare genetic disease
It has a long time since the cause of the disease has been identified: mutations of KMT2D gene codify for MLL4, a protein involved in the regulation of chromatin, which is the complex of proteins and nucleic acids contained in the nucleus of cells. However, research still has a long way to go to identify therapeutic approaches. An Italian team, coordinated by the University of Trento, has taken a step forward in this direction (2020-11-09)

Warfarin use significantly increases risk of knee and hip replacement in people with OA
New research shows that use of warfarin is associated with a significantly greater risk of knee and hip replacements in patients with OA. (2020-11-06)

Steroid injections do not hasten the need for knee replacement
New research shows that corticosteroid injections for knee OA treatment do not hasten a patient's progression to a total knee replacement when compared with hyaluronic acid injections. Details of this study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Some of the principal treatments for osteoporosis could reduce the incidence of COVID-19
A joint study by physicians at Hospital del Mar, researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Pompeu Fabra University and the Pere Virgili Health Care Park suggests that certain drugs used to treat osteoporosis are safe for COVID-19 patients and could even have a protective effect. The results support the recommendations of the scientific guidelines relating to the desirability of maintaining treatments for osteoporosis in patients with COVID-19. This is the first study of its kind in the world. (2020-11-03)

Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage
Instead of using synthetic materials, Penn Medicine study shows magnets could be used to arrange cells to grow new tissues (2020-10-19)

Gel instrumental in 3D bioprinting biological tissues
The eventual creation of replacement biological parts requires fully three-dimensional capabilities that two-dimensional and three-dimensional thin-film bioprinting cannot supply. Now, using a yield stress gel, Penn State engineers can place tiny aggregates of cells exactly where they want to build the complex shapes that will be necessary to replace bone, cartilage and other tissues. (2020-10-16)

Cartilage-Inspired, Lipid-Based and Super Slippery Synthetic Hydrogels
Drawing inspiration from the mechanisms that lubricate the cartilage in our joints over a lifetime of wear, researchers designed extremely slippery hydrogels with self-renewing, lipid-based boundary layers, which result in a near 100-fold reduction in friction and wear over other hydrogels. (2020-10-15)

Study upends understanding about joint injuries
An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can lead to severe osteoarthritis in both animal and human patients. Now, a new interdisciplinary study on the protein that lubricates our joints says that lubricant may actually be a precursor of joint disease. (2020-10-14)

Researchers use lab-grown tissue grafts for personalized joint replacement
A multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering, Columbia's College of Dental Medicine and Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University, LaCell LLC, and Obatala Sciences has now bioengineered living cartilage-bone temporomandibular joint grafts, precisely matched to the recipient, both biologically and anatomically. Their new study, published today in Science Translational Medicine, builds upon a long series of their previous work on bioengineering functional cartilage and bone for regenerative medicine and tissue models of disease. (2020-10-14)

Tissue grafts of both bone and cartilage could regenerate damage to a crucial jaw joint
Scientists have engineered tissue grafts that, in pigs, regenerated both bone and cartilage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a part of the jaw that can cause debilitating pain and disability when damaged. (2020-10-14)

Osteoarthritis biomarker could help 300 million people worldwide
University of South Australia researchers are a step closer to finding a new biomarker for osteoarthritis, a painful condition which affects more than 300 million people worldwide. (2020-10-11)

When it comes to arthritic bone spurs, stem cells hurt instead of heal
The same stem cells that heal broken bones can also generate arthritic bone spurs called osteophytes, according to a new study in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases. By resolving the cellular origins of osteophytes, the research provides clues for how to target these painful bone spurs that develop at the edge of joints in many arthritis patients. (2020-10-09)

Cell therapy designed to treat inflammatory bowel disease
The UPV/EHU's NanoBioCel research group has for many years been developing systems enabling cells to be used as drugs. Cell therapy raises hopes for treating those diseases for which there are as yet no effective pharmacological solutions. Biomaterials, a leading journal in the field of materials sciences and medicine, has just published the paper 'Multifunctional biomimetic hydrogel systems to boost the immunomodulatory potential of mesenchymal stromal cells'. (2020-09-28)

Artificial intelligence detects osteoarthritis years before it develops
Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis - too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist - on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset. (2020-09-21)

Ancient bony fish forces rethink of how sharks evolved
Sharks' non-bony skeletons were thought to be the template before bony internal skeletons evolved, but a new fossil discovery suggests otherwise. (2020-09-07)

How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility. The disc consists of a cartilaginous fibrous ring and a gelatinous core as a buffer. It has always been assumed that only humans and other mammals have discs. A misconception, as a research team under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now discovered: Even Tyrannosaurus rex could have suffered a slipped disc. The results have now been published in ''Scientific Reports''. (2020-08-24)

New approach to treating osteoarthritis advances
Injections of a natural 'energy' molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows. (2020-08-10)

Bone drug may be beneficial for knee osteoarthritis
Bisphosphonates (a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone density and used to treat osteoporosis and similar diseases) appear to be safe and beneficial for osteoarthritis patients. (2020-08-05)

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)

Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro. (2020-07-27)

Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past. The single-letter mutation showed that both the ancient and modern recipes for spine development are still to be found in the fish genome. (2020-07-20)

Novel bone imaging approach provides insights into the progression of knee osteoarthritis
A new approach to functional bone imaging has established that bone metabolism is abnormally elevated in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This physiological information provides a new functional measure to help assess degeneration of the knee joint. The research was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting, July 11-14, 2020. (2020-07-13)

From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, Duke University researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to match the strength and durability of the real thing. (2020-06-26)

The injury rate of dominant leg of soccer players is identical with the non-dominant one
The severity of knee joints damage in soccer players depends on their age and career duration, and the condition of articular cartilage and meniscus of the dominant and the non-dominant leg does not differ. However, even pronounced changes can be asymptomatic and do not impair knee joint mobility, as shown by a group of scientists, which included researchers from the Sechenov University. The findings which will help interpret the results of players clinical examination more accurately, were published in Sports Medicine - Open. (2020-06-22)

A rare heart bone is discovered in chimpanzees
Experts from the University of Nottingham have discovered that some chimpanzees have a bone in their heart, which could be vital in managing their health and conservation. (2020-06-10)

Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. (2020-06-09)

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