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Current Cartilage News and Events

Current Cartilage News and Events, Cartilage News Articles.
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Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle strength
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness. (2020-05-27)
Combinatorial screening approach opens path to better-quality joint cartilage
High-throughput platform identifies complex conditions with biomaterial compositions, and mechanical and chemical stimuli that help stem cells produce more robust cartilage. (2020-05-22)
Texas A&M lab engineers 3D-functional bone tissues
Dr. Akhilesh K. Gaharwar, associate professor, has developed a highly printable bioink as a platform to generate anatomical-scale functional tissues. (2020-05-19)
Little skates could hold the key to cartilage therapy in humans
Unlike humans and other mammals, the skeletons of sharks, skates, and rays are made entirely of cartilage and they continue to grow that cartilage throughout adulthood. (2020-05-12)
Use of a homozygous G608G progeria mouse model for degenerative joint diseases research
In a study published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, researchers led by Ara Nazarian, PhD, a principal investigator in the Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies at BIDMC, investigated the musculoskeletal phenotype of the homozygous G608G BAC-transgenic progeria mouse model, developed at Dr. (2020-05-11)
(Re)generation next: Novel strategy to develop scaffolds for joint tissue regeneration
In Japan, an increase in the aging population has exacerbated the demand for regenerative medicine to address increasingly common diseases, such as knee osteoarthritis. (2020-03-30)
Stem cells and nerves interact in tissue regeneration and cancer progression
Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. (2020-03-23)
Combined tissue engineering provides new hope for spinal disc herniations
A promising new tissue engineering approach may one day improve outcomes for patients who have undergone discectomy -- the primary surgical remedy for spinal disc herniations. (2020-03-11)
Producing human tissue in space
The University of Zurich has sent adult human stem cells to the International Space Station (ISS). (2020-03-07)
Cartilage cells, chromosomes and DNA preserved in 75 million-year-old baby duck-billed dinosaur
In a paper published online in National Science Review, an international team of scientists present evidence of fossilized cell nuclei and chromosomes within preserved cartilage in a baby duck-billed dinosaur. (2020-02-28)
Bone or cartilage? Presence of fatty acids determines skeletal stem cell development
In the event of a bone fracture, fatty acids in our blood signal to stem cells that they have to develop into bone-forming cells. (2020-02-26)
Grooves hold promise for sophisticated healing
Rice University bioengineers print 3D implants with layered cells destined to become distinct combinations of tissue, like bone and cartilage. (2020-02-04)
A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds
Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning. (2020-01-27)
Drug combo reverses arthritis in rats
Salk researchers have discovered that a powerful combination of 2 experimental drugs reverses the cellular and molecular signs of osteoarthritis in rats as well as in isolated human cartilage cells. (2020-01-21)
'Swiss cheese' bones could be cause of unexplained low back pain
In experiments with genetically engineered and old mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that the vast majority of low back pain in people may be rooted in an overgrowth of pain-sensing nerves into spinal cartilaginous tissue. (2020-01-13)
MIV-711 not associated with pain reduction, but may reduce disease progression in osteoarthritis
MIV-711, a novel selective cathepsin K inhibitor, was not more effective than placebo for reducing pain related to knee osteoarthritis. (2019-12-30)
Membrane inspired by bone and cartilage efficiently produces electricity from saltwater
Inspired by membranes in the body tissues of living organisms, scientists have combined aramid nanofibers used in Kevlar with boron nitride to construct a membrane for harvesting ocean energy that is both strong like bone and suited for ion transport like cartilage. (2019-12-18)
New early Cretaceous mammal fossils bridge a transitional gap in ear's evolution
Fossils of a previously unknown species of Early Cretaceous mammal have caught in the act the final steps by which mammals' multi-boned middle ears evolved, according to a new study. (2019-12-05)
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules
A joint research team led by MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History reported a new symmetrodont, Origolestes lii, a stem therian mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota, in China's Liaoning Province. (2019-12-05)
WFIRM scientists push bioprinting capability forward
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are the first to report using bioprinting to print a tracheal tissue construct comprising of multiple different functional materials. (2019-12-04)
New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate -- a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent -- with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China. (2019-11-27)
Study paves way to better understanding, treatment of arthritis
Oregon State University research has provided the first complete, cellular-level look at what's going on in joints afflicted by osteoarthritis, a debilitating and costly condition that affects nearly one-quarter of adults in the United States. (2019-11-25)
Low-cost, portable system takes OCT beyond ophthalmology
Researchers have developed a way to perform optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hard-to-reach areas of the body such as joints. (2019-11-12)
Methotrexate reduces joint damage progression over placebo in erosive hand OA
According to new research findings presented at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, methotrexate did not demonstrate superior efficacy over placebo for pain relief and function evolution at three and 12 months in patients with erosive hand osteoarthritis, but did significantly reduce the progression of joint damage over placebo and seems to facilitate bone remodeling in these patients. (2019-11-09)
Massive fangs and a death crush: How a 370 million year old tetrapod hunted and killed
The habits of a needle-toothed tetrapod which lived more than 370 million years ago have filled in a piece of the evolutionary puzzle after an international team of palaeontologists pieced together fossilised skeletons and found unusual characteristics such as a crocodile-like skull with high positioned eyes would have been used to 'keep an eye' on prey before it used its slender needle-like teeth and elastic jaw to snatch its kill and crush it to death. (2019-10-24)
Listening to 'noisy knees' to diagnose osteoarthritis: The first human cohort study
A new way of diagnosing and assessing knee osteoarthritis (OA) has moved a step closer with a major study paving the way for its use in research and clinical practice. (2019-10-16)
Experimental growth factor shows promise for treating knee osteoarthritis
A new experimental growth factor therapy appears to prevent a worsening of osteoarthritis by increasing the thickness of cartilage in the knee joint and preventing further loss, according to results from an early clinical trial that were published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2019-10-08)
Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone
Scientists have revealed how the electrical patterns formed within an embryo initiate a cascade of molecular changes that culminate in the development of cartilage and bone. (2019-10-07)
New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. (2019-10-04)
Researcher develops method to change fundamental architecture of polymers
A Florida State University research team has developed methods to manipulate polymers in a way that changes their fundamental structure, paving the way for potential applications in cargo delivery and release, recyclable materials, shape-shifting soft robots, antimicrobials and more. (2019-10-02)
New biofabrication method creates one scaffold to guide regeneration of multiple tissues
Lesley Chow and her colleagues at Lehigh University have taken a major step to address the challenge of engineer tissues organized like native tissues. (2019-09-30)
No bones about it, this protein slows down fracture-healing
Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: healed bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture. (2019-09-19)
Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed
Researchers from the University of Chicago have used tools developed to explore 3D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil fish for the first time. (2019-09-11)
How babies absorb calcium could be key to treating osteoporosis in seniors
New research reveals the mechanism that allows breastfeeding babies to absorb large amounts of calcium and build healthy bones -- a discovery that could lead to treatment for osteoporosis and other bone diseases later in life. (2019-09-10)
Addition of growth factors to unique system helps new bone formation
New technique aids bone formation. (2019-08-28)
Osteoarthritis: A chip 'mimics' the disease to devise effective drugs
A sophisticated chip the size of a coin in which cartilage can be cultivated and which can later be subjected to mechanical stress such that it generates the effects of Osteoarthrosis (OA). (2019-08-23)
Simple computational models can help predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis
Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland, in collaboration with the University of California in San Francisco, Cleveland Clinic, the University of Queensland, the University of Oulu and Kuopio University Hospital, have developed a method to predict post-traumatic osteoarthritis in patients with ligament ruptures using a simplified computational model. (2019-08-20)
Joint lubricating fluid plays key role in osteoarthritic pain, study finds
A team at the University of Cambridge has shown how, in osteoarthritis patients, the viscous lubricant that ordinarily allows our joints to move smoothly triggers a pain response from nerve cells similar that caused by chilli peppers. (2019-08-14)
Uncovering secrets of bone marrow cells and how they differentiate
Researchers mapped distinct bone marrow niche populations and their differentiation paths for the bone marrow factory that starts from mesenchymal stromal cells and ends with three types of cells -- fat cells, bone-making cells and cartilage-making cells. (2019-07-31)
Can magnetic stem cells improve cartilage repair?
Cells equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) can be directed to a specific location by an external magnetic field, which is beneficial for tissue repair. (2019-07-15)
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