Current Cauliflower News and Events

Current Cauliflower News and Events, Cauliflower News Articles.
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In kefir, microbial teamwork makes the dream work
While scientists know that microorganisms often live in communities and depend on their fellow community members for survival, mechanistic knowledge of this phenomenon has been quite limited. Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory combined a variety of state-of-the-art methods to better understand the microbial communities. This revealed that cooperation allows the microbes to do something they can't do alone. (2021-01-04)

Cauliflower coral genome sequenced
A newly sequenced coral genome offers tools to understand environmental adaptation. (2020-10-27)

More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet (2020-10-21)

Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland's deep sea
A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team. (2020-06-29)

Traditional vegetable diet lowers the risk of premature babies
It turns out we should follow our parent' advice when we're thinking about becoming parents ourselves, with a study finding eating the traditional 'three-vegies' before pregnancy lowers the risk of a premature birth. (2020-04-14)

Scientists optimize prime editing for rice and wheat
Recently, a research team led by Prof. GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the optimization of a prime editing system (PPE system) for creating desired point mutations, insertions and deletions in two major cereal crops, namely, rice and wheat. The main components of a PPE system are a Cas9 nickase-RT fusion protein and a pegRNA. (2020-03-16)

How plants in the cabbage family look inward when sulfur is scarce
Studying genetically modified model plants from the cabbage family, researchers at Kyushu University found that disrupting the production of two enzymes in thale cress plants growing in sulfur-deficient environments further stunts growth by reducing their ability to breakdown sulfur-containing glucosinolates. This new insight could one day help shed light on designing strategies for improving the content of health-beneficial glucosinolates in related crops and promoting effective sulfur utilization in modern agriculture. (2020-02-12)

Can chickpea genes save mustard seeds from blight disease?
During visits to fields in Assam, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, India, plant biologists Muthappa Senthil-Kumar and Urooj Fatima found mustard plants infested with Alternaria blight disease. They also noticed that an adjacent field of chickpeas were completely uninfected. (2020-01-29)

Study suggests US households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire
American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year. (2020-01-23)

Unlikely wasp enemy of a serious alien pest in North America named Idris elba
Idris is a worldwide genus of microscopic, parasitic wasps. A new species of Idris from Mexico (Guanajuato) and the United States (California, New Mexico) proved to be an unlikely enemy of the invasive bagrada bug, a major pest of various crops, including cruciferous vegetables. Described in the peer-reviewed, open-access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, this species is given the name 'elba,' making its name identical to that of British movie star Idris Elba. (2019-11-18)

Gutsy effort to produce comprehensive study of intestinal gases
UNSW Sydney chemical engineers have traced the journey of gases through the gut while further developing a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule. (2019-09-15)

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP tracks fire and smoke from two continents
Wherever fires are burning around the world NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite's Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) can track the smoke and aerosols. On Sept. 13, 2019, data from OMPS revealed aerosols and smoke from fires over both South America and North America. (2019-09-13)

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children. (2019-09-09)

Garlic on broccoli: A smelly approach to repel a major pest
New University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. Applying the framework to swede midge, a new invasive fly causing 100% crop losses for organic broccoli growers, the researchers uncover which odors are most effective at repelling the pest. (2019-07-23)

Localized efforts to save coral reefs won't be enough, study suggests
A National Science Foundation study of factors that cause corals stress suggests that localized attempts to curb pollution on reefs won't save them without a worldwide effort to reduce global warming. (2019-05-02)

Biotechnology to the rescue of Brussels sprouts
An international team has identified the genes that make these plants resistant to the pathogen that attacks crops belonging to the cabbage family all over the world. (2019-02-04)

New study finds unique immunity genes in one widespread coral species
A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science found that a common coral species might have evolved unique immune strategies to cope with environmental change. (2018-11-01)

How plants bind their green pigment chlorophyll
Water-soluble protein helps to understand the photosynthetic apparatus. (2018-10-18)

Genetic mutation underlying severe childhood brain disorder identified
Ashleigh Schaffer, PhD, assistant professor of genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and a team of global genetics experts have discovered a genetic mutation and the faulty development process it triggers, causing a debilitating brain-based disorder in children. (2018-08-09)

Coral tricks for adapting to ocean acidification
A molecular process that signals distress could also help corals adapt to climate change. (2018-06-08)

Spicing it up: High school students may prefer seasoned veggies over plain
High school students may prefer seasoned vegetables more than plain, according to Penn State researchers who hope that this will lead to students liking and eating more veggies, and result in less food waste in school. (2018-03-06)

Like it or not: Broccoli may be good for the gut
For the broccoli haters of the world, researchers may have more bad news: the vegetable may also help promote a healthy gut. (2017-10-12)

Signs of sleep seen in jellyfish
The upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea demonstrates the three hallmarks of sleep and represents the first example of sleep in animals without a brain, HHMI researchers report. (2017-09-21)

Compound shows promise in treating melanoma
While past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward creating a drug that can kill melanoma cancer cells without harming nearby healthy cells. (2017-07-26)

A tale of two sites
Marine scientists determine how the larvae of a common coral species respond to environmental stresses in Taiwan and Moorea. (2017-05-16)

Baycrest creates first Canadian Brain Health Food Guide for adults
Baycrest scientists have led the development of the first Canadian Brain Health Food Guide to help adults over 50 preserve their thinking and memory skills as they age. (2017-03-15)

Up to 10 portions of fruit and vegetables a day may prevent 7.8 million premature deaths
A fruit and vegetable intake above five-a-day shows major benefit in reducing the chance of heart attack, stroke, cancer and early death. This is the finding of new research, led by scientists from Imperial College London, which analyzed 95 studies on fruit and vegetable intake. (2017-02-22)

New research on shallow warm clouds will advance climate models, weather forecasts
David Mechem is leading a new $525,000, three-year grant from the US Department of Energy to better understand the fundamental processes governing the behavior of shallow clouds. (2017-01-18)

Grow more crops at the same time
By growing more crops at the same time, organic vegetable farmers can reduce nitrogen loss to the aquatic environment and reduce the need to apply fertilizer in the subsequent year, according to research from Aarhus University. (2016-11-23)

Metagenomic study links microbes to flavors in kefir
A team of food scientists and microbiologists in Ireland have used high-throughput sequencing to analyze how microbial populations change as kefir ferments. It's a new frontier in food analysis: Using the data, collected over a 24-hour fermentation period, the researchers were able to connect the presence of individual microbial species and their associated pathways to flavor compounds in the fermented milk beverage. (2016-10-04)

Organic farmers to grow and harvest the manure of the future
In the long term the Danish organic agricultural organizations want to phase out the use of conventional animal manure in organic production. Recent research from Aarhus University shows that it may be profitable for organic farmers to replace animal manure by so-called mobile green manure and still achieve the same effect. (2016-08-19)

10-minute urine test can measure specific compounds from food consumed
Can we say goodbye to unreliable food diaries and diet recall in exchange for a urine test that will better aid researchers in figuring out what foods might help prevent cancer? Researchers have developed a method that can quickly evaluate specific food compounds in human urine. They say their method could one day replace unreliable food logs used in population studies examining the effects of diet on cancer and will also help scientists accurately identify the most beneficial anticancer foods. (2016-03-16)

Study shows broccoli may offer protection against liver cancer
Research has shown that eating broccoli three to five times per week can lower the risk of many types of cancers. Consuming a high-fat, high-sugar diet and having excess body fat is linked with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which can lead to diseases such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. A new study from the University of Illinois shows that including broccoli in the diet may protect against liver cancer, as well as aid in countering the development of NAFLD. (2016-03-03)

Higher dietary fiber intake in young women may reduce breast cancer risk
Boston, MA - Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood--especially lots of fruits and vegetables--may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2016-02-01)

Researchers determine how the brain controls robotic grasping tools
Grasping an object involves a complex network of brain functions. First, visual cues are processed in specialized areas of the brain. Then, other areas of the brain use these signals to control the hands to reach for and manipulate the desired object. New findings from researchers at the University of Missouri suggest that the cerebellum, a region of the brain that has changed very little over time, may play a critical role. Findings could lead to advancements in assistive technologies benefiting the disabled. (2015-02-02)

Sweet potato leaves a good source of vitamins
A study designed to determine the ascorbic acid, thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamin B6 content in foliar tissues of sweet potato confirmed that mature and young sweet potato leaves can be a good source of multiple water-soluble vitamins in the human diet. Young leaves contained the highest ascorbic acid content, followed by mature leaves and buds. (2015-01-14)

Beyond prevention: Sulforaphane may find possible use for cancer therapy
New research has identified one of the key cancer-fighting mechanisms for sulforaphane, and suggests that this much-studied phytochemical found in broccoli and other foods may be able to move beyond cancer prevention and toward therapeutic use for advanced prostate cancer. (2015-01-12)

Canola genome sequence reveals evolutionary 'love triangle'
An international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Georgia recently published the genome of Brassica napus -- commonly known as canola -- in the journal Science. Their discovery paves the way for improved versions of the plant, which is used widely in farming and industry. (2014-08-21)

Pyrocumulonibus cloud rises up from Canadian wildfires
The Northern Territories in Canada is experiencing one of its worst fire seasons in history. As of this date, there have been 344 wildfires that have burned 2,830,907 hectares of land (close to 7 million acres). The area around the Great Slave Lake, Yellowknife, Ft. Smith, and the Buffalo Lake have been plagued with uncontrolled fires all season long. (2014-08-06)

Genetic discovery points the way to much bigger yields in tomato, other flowering food plants
CSHL researchers announced that they have determined a way to dramatically increase tomato production. Their research has revealed a genetic mechanism for hybrid vigor, a property of plant breeding that has long been exploited to boost yield. Teasing out the hidden subtleties of a type of hybrid vigor involving just one gene has provided the scientists with means to extend the length of time that specific tomato varieties can produce flowers, substantially raising fruit yield. (2013-12-26)

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