Current Cavities News and Events

Current Cavities News and Events, Cavities News Articles.
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Arizona economic burden of valley fever totals $736 million
Expenses for the fungal disease endemic to the Southwest can skyrocket for people whose diagnosis is delayed, leading to more serious infection or death. (2021-02-09)

Palaeontology: Fossil burrows point to ancient seafloor colonization by giant marine worms
Giant ambush-predator worms, possible ancestors of the 'bobbit worm', may have colonized the seafloor of the Eurasian continent around 20 million years ago. The findings, based on the reconstruction of large, L-shaped burrows from layers of seafloor dating back to the Miocene (23 million to 5.3 million years ago) of northeast Taiwan, are reported in Scientific Reports this week. (2021-01-21)

Machine learning improves particle accelerator diagnostics
Operators of Jefferson Lab's primary particle accelerator are getting a new tool to help them quickly address issues that can prevent it from running smoothly. The machine learning system has passed its first two-week test, correctly identifying glitchy accelerator components and the type of glitches they're experiencing in near-real-time. An analysis of the results of the first field test of the custom-built machine learning system was recently published in the journal Physical Review Accelerators and Beams. (2021-01-05)

Pizza can help address the dark matter mystery?
The IBS research team developed a novel multiple-cell cavity ('pizza cavity') haloscope that will extend the axion search band to higher-frequency regions. (2020-12-11)

Optimising laser-driven electron acceleration
In a new paper published in the EPJ D, Etele Molnár, ELI-NP, Bucharest, and co-authors study and review the characteristics of electron acceleration in a vacuum caused by the highest-power laser pulses achievable today looking for the key to maximum net energy gain. (2020-12-04)

Can we make bones heal faster?
A new paper in Science Advances describes for the first time how minerals come together at the molecular level to form bones and other hard tissues, like teeth and enamel. (2020-12-03)

Breaking the power and speed limit of lasers
Researchers at the George Washington University have developed a new design of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) that demonstrates record-fast temporal bandwidth. (2020-11-19)

Analysis paves way for more sensitive quantum sensors
Theoretical researchers at Pritzker Molecular Engineering have found a way to make quantum sensors exponentially more sensitive by harnessing a unique physics phenomenon. (2020-11-16)

Research produces intense light beams with quantum correlations
Potential applications of research conducted at the University of São Paulo include high-precision metrology and information encoding. (2020-11-12)

Order in the disorder:
For the first time, a team at HZB has identified the atomic substructure of amorphous silicon with a resolution of 0.8 nanometres using X-ray and neutron scattering at BESSY II and BER II. Such a-Si:H thin films have been used for decades in solar cells, TFT displays, and detectors. The results show that three different phases form within the amorphous matrix, which dramatically influences the quality and lifetime of the semiconductor layer. (2020-10-29)

Mouthwashes, oral rinses may inactivate human coronaviruses
Certain oral antiseptics and mouthwashes may have the ability to inactivate human coronaviruses, according to a Penn State College of Medicine research study. The results indicate that some of these products might be useful for reducing the viral load, or amount of virus, in the mouth after infection and may help to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. (2020-10-19)

When Fock meets Landau: Topology in atom-photon interactions
Topological photonics concerns the classical wave simulation of electronic band topology. Does the quantum nature of light embed new topological states? By exploiting the similarity between the Jaynes-Cummings model and graphene, topological states of quantized light were found with a wealth of physics involving the valley Hall effect, the Haldane model and the Lifshitz topological transition. This research built a bridge between quantum electrodynamics and topological phases in condensed matter physics. (2020-10-14)

Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined. This was revealed by Radboud university medical center researchers and their colleagues in a publication in Nature Communications. It turns out that bone formation does not require complex biomolecules in collagen at all. This means that the production of bone substitutes and biomaterials is less complicated than was previously thought. (2020-10-08)

SLAC invention could make particle accelerators 10 times smaller
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has invented a new type of accelerator structure that could make accelerators used for a given application 10 times shorter. (2020-09-23)

Novel photoresist enables 3D printing of smallest porous structures
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University have developed a photoresist for two-photon microprinting. It has now been used for the first time to produce three-dimensional polymer microstructures with cavities in the nano range. In Advanced Materials, the scientists involved in the joint Cluster of Excellence 3D Matter Made to Order report how porosity can be controlled during printing and how this affects light scattering properties of the microstructures. (DOI: 10.1002/adma.202002044) (2020-09-16)

Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations. (2020-09-16)

Glass tables can cause life-threatening injuries
Faulty glass in tables can cause life-threatening injuries, according to a Rutgers study, which provides evidence that stricter federal regulations are needed to protect consumers. (2020-09-15)

Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Fish and seaweed secrete a layer of mucus to create a slippery surface, reducing their friction as they travel through water. A potential way to mimic this is by creating lubricant-infused surfaces covered with cavities. As the cavities are continuously filled with the lubricant, a layer is formed over the surface. In the journal Physics of Fluids, researchers in South Korea conducted simulations of this process to help explain the effects. (2020-09-15)

Temporal-spatial order property of hollow multishelled structures enables sequential drug release
A recent research led by Prof. WANG Dan and Prof. ZHANG Suojiang from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences studied the diffusion and transport mechanism of antimicrobial molecules through HoMSs, and discovered that the unique temporal-spatial order property of HoMSs can realize the sequential drug release for the first time. (2020-09-08)

Scientists propose nano-confinement strategy to form sub-nanometer reactors
Prof. LIU Jian from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators proposed a nano-confinement strategy to host multiple Fe and Cu single atoms inside the extremely narrow yet regular surface cavities of graphitic carbon nitride to form 'sub-nanometer reactors'. (2020-09-04)

Can black hole fire up cold heart of the phoenix?
Radio astronomers have detected jets of hot gas blasted out by a black hole in the galaxy at the heart of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster, located 5.9 billion light-years away in the constellation Phoenix. This is an important result for understanding the coevolution of galaxies, gas, and black holes in galaxy clusters. (2020-08-31)

Red, green and blue single-mode lasing in heterogeneously coupled system
Tunable microlasers that span the full visible spectrum, particularly red, green and blue (RGB)colors, are of crucial importance for various optical devices. Towards this goal, scientist in China proposed a heterogeneously coupled structure composed of three spherical microcavities. With each resonator serving as lasing source and filter simultaneously, tunable red, green and blue lasing was demonstrated. The strategy will not only provide new insight into the mode selection mechanism but also support the innovation of photonic units in optoelectronic system. (2020-08-30)

Trapping and controlling light at the interface of atomically thin nanomaterials
In a recent study, scientists at Cornell University propose a novel method by which nanoscale light can be manipulated and transported. (2020-08-20)

Stopping tooth decay before it starts -- without killing bacteria
Eating sugar or other carbohydrates after dental cleanings causes oral bacteria to quickly rebuild plaque and to produce acids that corrode tooth enamel, leading to cavities. Today, scientists report a treatment that could someday stop plaque and cavities from forming in the first place, using a new type of cerium nanoparticle formulation. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Tellurium makes the difference
The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them are of major importance in our daily lives. An international research group from Germany and Finland discovered astonishing and beautiful molecular structures when they used the element tellurium in ring-shaped hydrocarbon molecules. These compounds are distinguished by the fact that they are arranged in the crystal to form highly symmetrical tubes that interact with each other via the tellurium atoms. (2020-08-06)

Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Researchers in Spain have examined bird nests in order to understand how flying insects and parasites detect gases as a way to locate their hosts. The study found that nests that had higher concentrations of carbon dioxide attracted more biting midges, a type of insect that carries a common blood parasite that infects local birds. The findings have implications regarding how diseases spread, which will be affected as carbon levels rise due to climate change. (2020-08-05)

Lava tubes on Mars and the Moon are so wide they can host planetary bases
Researchers at the Universities of Bologna and Padua studied the subsurface cavities that lava created underground on Mars and the Moon. These cavities can shield from cosmic radiations (2020-08-05)

New printing process advances 3D capabilities
More durable prosthetics and medical devices for patients and stronger parts for airplanes and automobiles are just some of the products that could be created through a new 3D printing technology invented by a UMass Lowell researcher. (2020-07-31)

Valley-Hall nanoscale lasers
Topological photonics allows the creation of new states of light. Miniaturization of topological states to the nanoscale offers new opportunities for controlling light in integrated nanophotonic circuits. Recently, a team of researchers demonstrated a nanoscale laser based on a topological cavity. Researchers employed InGaAsP quantum well membrane as a gain medium and nanopatterned it making a cavity that hosts a topological mode of light. They observed a single-mode lasing at a room temperature. (2020-07-21)

HIV alone not a risk factor for cavities in children
Recent studies indicate HIV infection heightens the risk of dental cavities - but a Rutgers researcher has found evidence that the risk of cavities comes not from HIV itself but from a weakened immune system, which could be caused by other diseases. (2020-07-15)

New substance library to accelerate the search for active compounds
The MX team at HZB and a Group at the University of Marburg have established a new substance library. It consists of 1103 organic molecules that could be used as building blocks for new drugs. Now, this library has been validated at MAX IV. The substance library of the HZB is available for research worldwide and also plays a role in the search for active substances against SARS-CoV-19. (2020-07-13)

How the giant sequoia protects itself
A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall. (2020-06-17)

A breakthrough in developing multi-watt terahertz lasers
Researchers from Lehigh University are reporting another terahertz technology breakthrough: they have developed a new phase-locking technique for plasmonic lasers and, through its use, achieved a record-high power output for terahertz lasers. Their laser produced the highest radiative efficiency for any single-wavelength semiconductor quantum cascade laser. These results are explained in a paper, 'Phase-locked terahertz plasmonic laser array with 2 W output power in a single spectral mode' published yesterday in Optica. (2020-06-11)

Bacteria in Chinese pickles can prevent cavities -- Ben-Gurion University study
Prof. Ariel Kushmaro of the BGU Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the Chinese research team evaluated 14 different types of Sichuan pickles from southwest China. They extracted 54 different strains of Lactobacilli and found that one, L. plantarum K41, significantly reduced the incidence and severity of cavities. K41 was also highly tolerant of acids and salts, an additional benefit as a probiotic for harsh oral conditions. It also could have potential commercial value when added to dairy products. (2020-06-11)

Pitt researchers' new material allows for unprecedented imaging deeper in tissues
A team from the Department of Chemistry has established an approach for the creation of a metal-organic framework material that provides new perspectives for biological imaging. (2020-06-09)

What information is coded in bird alarm calls -- a new study from Korea
Recordings of the Oriental tit's alarm responses showed that alarm calls to snakes have special acoustic properties different from calls to chipmunks, even though both predators can enter bird's nests and destroy broods. Nestlings escaped from nests (and from the snake) when they heard a recording of the ''snake call'' but not ''chipmunk call'' by parents. This suggests that the calls do not carry information about predator's ability to enter the nest cavity, and that snakes are ''special'' predators. (2020-05-25)

Army researchers see path to quantum computing at room temperature
Army researchers predict quantum computer circuits that will no longer need extremely cold temperatures to function could become a reality after about a decade. (2020-05-01)

High-efficiency catalyst enhancing the electric reduction performance of CO2
It provides new ideas for the design of the catalyst nanostructures boosting an efficient reaction. (2020-04-16)

Clemson researchers unraveling role of fungi in early childhood dental health
Clemson University researchers have conducted a study that may someday lead to better cavity prevention measures and treatments. The team examined the oral mycobiome by taking a site-specific approach -- looking at both tooth and mouth health -- which enabled them to categorize each plaque sample along a continuum. They identified 139 species of fungus that live in human dental plaque, including nine that were strongly associated with dental health. (2020-04-06)

New molecular mechanism that regulates the sentinel cells of the immune system
CNIC scientists have uncovered a new molecular mechanism that determines the identity and expansion of one of the cell types that work as immune sentinels in the body -- the macrophages of the serous cavities. (2020-04-03)

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