Current Celiac Disease News and Events

Current Celiac Disease News and Events, Celiac Disease News Articles.
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Making wheat and peanuts less allergenic
Research uses plant breeding and biotechnology to remove proteins associated with food allergies. (2021-01-27)

Fighting hypertension through electrical impulses
Electrical impulses applied to a particular branch of the vagus nerve could be used in the future to reduce complications of arterial hypertension. These are the results of a research conducted, on animal models, by the Department of Angiocardioneurology and Translational Medicine of the I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, in Italy, and published in the scientific journal Cell Reports. (2020-12-15)

Study finds antibiotics before age 2 associated with childhood health issues
In a retrospective case study, Mayo Clinic researchers have found that antibiotics administered to children younger than 2 are associated with several ongoing illnesses or conditions, ranging from allergies to obesity. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2020-11-16)

Antibiotic exposure in children under age 2 associated with chronic conditions
Children under age 2 who take antibiotics are at greater risk for childhood-onset asthma, respiratory allergies, eczema, celiac disease, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a paper written jointly by Mayo Clinic and Rutgers researchers. While previous studies have looked at the association of antibiotics with single diseases, this is the first to look at the association across many diseases. (2020-11-16)

Tryptophan's role in celiac pathway in mice points to treatment strategies
New studies in mice show how an inability to metabolize tryptophan may be related to celiac disease, according to Bruno Lamas and colleagues. (2020-10-21)

More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet (2020-10-21)

AGA recommends bidirectional endoscopy for most patients with iron deficiency anemia
The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new clinical guidelines outlining an evidence-based approach for the initial gastrointestinal evaluation of chronic iron deficiency anemia in asymptomatic patients. Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common worldwide, and a gastrointestinal cause should be considered in all patients without an obvious cause for their anemia. (2020-09-01)

Unique antibody profile sets gluten sensitivity apart from celiac disease
People with gluten sensitivity have an antibody profile that differs from that of people with celiac disease, which could help doctors diagnose gluten sensitivity. (2020-08-31)

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?
In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research are helping to answer this question. (2020-08-11)

New test better predicts which babies will develop type 1 diabetes
A new approach to predicting which babies will develop type 1 diabetes moves a step closer to routine testing for newborns which could avoid life-threatening complications. (2020-08-07)

A new tool for modeling the human gut microbiome
MIT engineers designed a device that replicates the lining of the colon. With the device, they can grow human colon cells along with oxygen-intolerant bacteria that normally live in the human digestive tract and have been implicated in Crohn's disease. (2020-08-06)

New review on management of osteoporosis in premenopausal women
An IOF and ECTS Working Group have published an updated review of literature published after 2017 on premenopausal osteoporosis. It outlines key information on factors affecting peak bone mass and distinguishing low bone mass from proper osteoporosis with increased fracture risk at a young age, causes of secondary osteoporosis versus idiopathic osteoporosis, as well as pregnancy-and lactation-associated osteoporosis. Also provided is a helpful flow-chart as general guidance for the management of this condition. (2020-07-27)

Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked
A systematic review and meta-analysis that has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. Similarly, the risk for celiac disease is increased in IBD patients, though to a smaller extent. (2020-05-13)

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (2020-05-12)

How probiotic Bifidobacteria could help celiac disease patients
Gluten is enemy No. 1 for those with celiac disease, and it's hard to avoid. Episodes of this chronic autoimmune illness can be triggered by ingesting gluten, a key protein in wheat and some other grains. Researchers have been exploring how gut bacteria, especially Bifidobacteria, could be used as a treatment. Now, scientists publishing the results of laboratory experiments in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry report how specific types of Bifidobacteria work. (2020-04-15)

Celiac disease linked to increased risk of premature death
People with celiac disease have increased risk of dying prematurely, despite increased awareness of the disease in recent years and better access to gluten-free food. This is according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Columbia University in the US published in the prestigious journal JAMA. Celiac disease was linked to increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and respiratory disease. (2020-04-07)

But you don't look sick? How broad categories like autoimmune impact patient experience
Patients with autoimmune diseases often have an illness experience riddled with symptom ambiguities and shifting diagnoses. A new Drexel University study found that one way patients and physicians can work through the difficulty and frustration of communicating about these conditions is to use both broad diagnostic terms, like 'autoimmune disease,' as well as narrow ones, such as 'lupus or MS.' (2020-03-24)

Celiac disease might be cured by restoring immune tolerance to gliadin
Celiac disease affects 0.3-2.4% of people in most countries world-wide, and approx. 2% in Finland. Celiac patients suffer from a variety of symptoms, typically intestinal complaints, such as diarrhea, but are often symptom-free. Immunologist Tobias Freitag co-developed and tested nanoparticles containing gliadin for the immunomodulatory treatment of celiac disease in Professor Seppo Meri's research group at the University of Helsinki, in collaboration with industry. (2020-02-27)

Research pinpoints rogue cells at root of autoimmune disease
Breakthrough cellular genomics technology has allowed Garvan and UNSW Sydney researchers to reveal genetic mutations causing rogue behaviour in the cells that cause autoimmune disease. (2020-02-13)

New mouse model for celiac disease to speed research on treatments
Researchers at the University of Chicago have developed the first truly accurate mouse model of celiac disease. The animals have the same genetic and immune system characteristics as humans who develop celiac after eating gluten. This provides a vital research tool for developing and testing new treatments for the disease. (2020-02-12)

Novel communication between intestinal microbes and developing immune cells in the thymus
Researchers discover microbes regulate the development of specialized immune cells in the thymus that play a critical role in mucosal tolerance. (2020-01-23)

Just don't eat it: Play Doh, dry pasta show little gluten transfer when used for play
Parents who worry their child with celiac disease may be exposed to gluten at school might be able to strike two common school substances -- Play Doh and dry, uncooked pasta -- from the exposure risk list, as long as children don't consume them. A preliminary study from Children's National Hospital published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition found no significant gluten transfer on hands or surfaces after children used these items for classroom and sensory play. (2020-01-08)

Your DNA is not your destiny -- or a good predictor of your health
In most cases, your genes have less than five per cent to do with your risk of developing a particular disease, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists. (2019-12-19)

Comparing heirloom and modern wheat effects on gut health
Amid concerns about gluten sensitivity, increasing numbers of people are avoiding wheat. Most have not been diagnosed with a wheat-related medical condition, yet they seem to feel better when they don't eat gluten-containing foods. A possible explanation is that modern varieties of wheat are responsible. But now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that a popular modern variety does not impair gastrointestinal health in mice compared with heirloom wheat. (2019-12-18)

Space travel can make the gut leaky
Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enter our gut through the food we eat. Fortunately, the epithelial cells that line our intestines serve as a robust barrier to prevent these microorganisms from invading the rest of our bodies. A research team led by a University of California, Riverside, biomedical scientist has found that simulated microgravity, such as that encountered in spaceflight, disrupts the functioning of the epithelial barrier even after removal from the microgravity environment. (2019-11-26)

New method enables easier and faster detection of celiac disease antibodies
Researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, developed a novel diagnostic method for the rapid on-site measurement of antibodies from patient samples. Now they have applied this new method for the diagnostics of celiac disease, with promising results. These results may prompt the development of similar tests for the diagnostics of other autoimmune disorders. (2019-11-26)

MU researchers describe catatonia in Down syndrome
Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's most common chromosomal disorder. Inherited heart defects, thyroid cancer, celiac disease and developmental disabilities are common Down syndrome complications. Only recently has catatonia, a behavioral condition marked by new onset immobility, mutism, withdrawal and other behavioral abnormalities, been recognized in Down syndrome. (2019-11-19)

Inflammatory bowel disease appears to impact risk of Parkinson's disease
Amsterdam, NL, November 14, 2019 - Relatively new research findings indicating that the earliest stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) may occur in the gut have been gaining traction in recent years. In a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, Tomasz Brudek, PhD, evaluates evidence for the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and PD and proposes directions for future research. (2019-11-14)

New treatment may reverse celiac disease
A phase 2 clinical trial using a new technology show it is possible to induce immune tolerance to gluten in individuals with celiac disease. After treatment with the technology, the patients were able to eat gluten with a substantial reduction in inflammation. (2019-10-22)

Adults with undiagnosed Celiac disease have lower bone density, says first study on topic
Research by George Mason University College of Health and Human Services found lower bone density in adults who are likely to have undiagnosed celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by consuming gluten, despite this group consuming more calcium and phosphorous than the control group. (2019-10-17)

Do celiac families need 2 toasters?
Parents using multiple kitchen appliances and utensils to prevent their child with celiac disease from being exposed to gluten may be able to eliminate some cumbersome steps. A new, preliminary study from Children's National Hospital published in the journal Gastroenterology found no significant gluten transfer when tools like the same toaster or knives are used for both gluten-free and gluten-containing foods. (2019-09-30)

AGA releases guideline on the evaluation of chronic diarrhea
Diagnosing patients with chronic watery diarrhea can be difficult for health care providers, since several causes with specific therapies, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), microscopic colitis and chronic infection, need to be ruled out. A new clinical guideline1 from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, provides recommendations on the appropriate laboratory tests based on current evidence to exclude other diagnoses in the setting of suspected functional diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D). (2019-09-23)

Study: Obesity associated with abnormal bowel habits -- not diet
Because researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center demonstrated for the first time that a strong association between obesity and chronic diarrhea is not driven by diet or physical activity, the findings could have important implications for how physicians might approach and treat symptoms of diarrhea in patients with obesity differently. (2019-09-18)

Child's gluten intake during infancy, rather than mother's during pregnancy, linked to increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes
New research presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (16-20 September) shows that a child's intake of gluten at age 18 months is associated with a 46% increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes for each extra 10g of gluten consumed. (2019-09-18)

Mayo Clinic study calls for screening of family members of celiac disease patients
Parents, siblings and children of people with celiac disease are at high risk of also having the disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study. This study calls for screening of all first-degree relatives of patients -- not just those who show symptoms. (2019-08-22)

Genetic risk is associated with differences in gut microbiome
Children with a high genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes have different gut microbiomes than children with a low risk, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden and the University of Florida in the US. The results published in the scientific journal Nature Communications suggest that genetic risk can shape an individual's response to environmental factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. (2019-08-19)

'Catcher of the rye' method detects rye gluten proteins in foods
Gluten-free diets have been trendy for several years now, with adherents claiming that avoiding grains that contain the substance helps with weight loss or improves general health. However, for people with celiac disease, avoiding gluten is not a fad but a necessity. Now, researchers reporting in the Journal of Proteome Research have developed a method to detect proteins from rye, which could help food manufacturers meet regulatory requirements for 'gluten-free' claims on foods. (2019-08-14)

Study examines gluten consumption in childhood, celiac disease risk in genetically at-risk kids
Consuming more gluten during the first five years of life was associated with increased risk of celiac disease and celiac disease autoimmunity (the presence of antibodies in the blood) among genetically predisposed children. It remains unclear whether the amount of gluten consumed can trigger celiac disease. This observational study included 6,605 children born between 2004 and 2010 in Finland, Germany, Sweden and the United States who had a genetic predisposition for celiac disease. (2019-08-13)

Gluten response in celiac patients could lead to diagnostic test
Distinct markers in the blood of people with celiac disease have been detected within a few hours of gluten being consumed. The findings address a longstanding mystery about what drives the adverse reaction to gluten in celiac disease and could lead to a world-first blood test for diagnosing the disease. A potential blood-based test would be a vast improvement on the current approach which requires people to consume gluten for a number of weeks, and even months, for the testing to be accurate. (2019-08-07)

Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis
A seldom-studied class of immune cells may reduce the friendly fire that drives autoimmune disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Stimulating these protective cells could lead to new therapies for diseases in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues, such as multiple sclerosis and celiac disease. (2019-08-07)

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