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Current Cell Culture News and Events, Cell Culture News Articles.
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Preexisting antibodies targeting SARS-CoV-2 discovered in small proportion of uninfected individuals
Scientists have detected preexisting antibody-driven immunity against SARS-CoV-2 in a small proportion of individuals who were uninfected at the time of sampling. (2020-11-06)

Technique to regenerate optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment
Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. (2020-11-05)

Novel adoptive cell transfer method shortens timeline for T-cell manufacture
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers find a new way to generate T-cells faster, making immediate treatment with this therapy possible. (2020-10-30)

SMART researchers develop new gelatin microcarrier for cell production
Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) developed a novel microcarrier for large-scale cell production and expansion that offers higher yield and cost-effectiveness compared to traditional methods, and reduces steps required in the cell retrieval process. The findings can help treat ailments such as bone and cartilage defects and graft vs. host disease. (2020-10-29)

Thymoquinone induces apoptosis & DNA damage in 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colorectal cancer
Volume 11, Issue 31 from @Oncotarget reported that TQ decreased the expression levels of colorectal stem cell markers CD44 and Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule Ep CAM and proliferation marker Ki67 in colonospheres derived from both cell lines and reduced cellular migration and invasion. (2020-10-22)

Two studies point to an unrecognized avenue for anti-viral therapies against COVID-19
Helping to explain what makes SARS-CoV-2 so capable of infecting human cells, researchers in two independent studies discovered that the virus's spike protein recognizes and binds a protein on the human cell surface called neuropilin-1. (2020-10-20)

How some sea slugs keep their ability to carry out plant-like photosynthesis
Scientists have shed new light on a relationship between a sea slug and tiny structures called chloroplasts from their food algae that allow the animals to photosynthesise in a similar way to plants. (2020-10-20)

Evidence review confirms CDC guidance about infectivity of novel coronavirus
A new review of dozens of studies suggests that people may shed virus for prolonged periods, but those with mild or no symptoms may be infectious for no more than about 10 days. People who are severely ill from COVID-19 may be infectious for as long as 20 days, according to the review. (2020-10-20)

Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP). The study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found a culture of concealment of pain and injury in rowers, leading to poor outcomes for these athletes. (2020-10-15)

Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity. (2020-10-15)

Neural crest cell migration in Hirschsprung disease
Ankush Gosain, MD, PhD, of Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center has focused his research on determining the mechanisms underlying abnormal development of the enteric nervous system in Hirschsprung disease. Gosain recently published a new study in The FASEB Journal. (2020-10-13)

Computational approach to optimise culture conditions required for cell therapy
Collaboration by researchers in Singapore and Australia lead to first-of-its-kind computational biology algorithm that could enable more effective cellular therapies against major diseases. (2020-10-12)

Damaged muscles don't just die, they regenerate themselves
Researchers building a model of muscle damage in a cultured system found that components leaking from broken muscle fibers activate ''satellite cells,'' which are muscle stem cells. While attempting to identify the activating proteins, they found that metabolic enzymes, such as GAPDH, rapidly activated quiescent satellite cells and accelerated muscle injury regeneration. This is a highly rational and efficient regeneration mechanism, in which the damaged muscle itself activates satellite cells for regeneration. (2020-10-12)

Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
POSTECH and Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital joint research team develops a thermoresponsive nanotopography cell culture platform. (2020-10-08)

The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level. They found tdTomato-positive p16 high cells detectable in all organs, which were enriched with age. They also found that these cells failed to proliferate and had half-lives ranging from 2.6 to 4.2 months, depending on the tissue examined. (2020-10-07)

Drug found to correct gene defect that causes immune-driven gut leakiness
A team of researchers led by biomedical scientist Declan McCole at the University of California, Riverside, has found that the drug tofacitinib, also called Xeljanz and approved by the FDA to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, can repair permeability defects in the intestine. ''Our work could help improve identification of patients who will be better responders to this drug,'' says McCole, a professor of biomedical sciences in the School of Medicine. (2020-09-29)

Tests indicate modern oral nicotine products elicit lower toxicity responses than cigs
New research by BAT indicates that Modern Oral Products (MOPs) showed lower toxicity responses in certain assays than traditional cigarettes. (2020-09-28)

Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new generation of microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses, enabling studies of how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other. (2020-09-28)

Researchers discover a new method to regulate cell plasticity
Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage. The new method sheds light on processes in which cell plasticity is important, such as cancer and immunology. The study has been published in the journal Nature Cell Biology and has been supported by ''la Caixa'' Foundation. (2020-09-28)

Lending color to dead cells -- A novel natural dye for screening cell viability
Synthetic dyes are commonly used to assess the toxicity of chemical compounds in cell cultures. However, these dyes damage cells, rendering the cultures useless for long-term experiments. Recently, scientists from Japan discovered that a natural food pigment can replace synthetic dyes in cell viability assays for three widely varied types of cells--and performs better. Their approach is also environment-friendly and inexpensive, and opens up possibilities in a range of fields including drug discovery. (2020-09-24)

"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products. (2020-09-22)

Analysis shows high level of SARS-CoV-2 contamination in patient toilets, staff and public areas in hosptials
A systematic review of evidence being presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease shows that air around patients with COVID-19, as well as patients toilets, and staff and public areas in hospitals are all show significant levels of contamination with SARS-CoV-2. (2020-09-22)

Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa. (2020-09-16)

Women more prone to depression in countries with low gender equality rankings
Overall, the presence of depressive symptoms is highly dependent on cultural congruence, whereas self-esteem is not. (2020-09-16)

Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history. In reality, their genome contains lots of genes from Southern and Eastern Europe, which also implies that they had dark rather than blonde hair. And within the Scandinavian borders, the Vikings did not really mix genetically; instead, they travelled abroad on plundering raids. This is revealed by new research from the University of Copenhagen. (2020-09-16)

Women hold prominent roles, publish more in 'open science' vs. 'reproducibility' model
An international group of researchers examined the two paths that scientists are following to improve science: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. They have very distinct cultures, with two distinct literatures produced by two groups of researchers with little crossover. Their investigation also suggests that one of the movements -- open science -- promotes greater equity, diversity, and inclusivity. (2020-09-16)

To repair a damaged heart, three cells are better than one
CardioClusters use three types of cells to reduce scar tissue and improve function by integrating into and persisting within damaged heart tissue. (2020-09-15)

SMART researchers develop fast and efficient method to produce red blood cells
Researchers from Singapore-MIT developed a faster and more efficient way to manufacture red blood cells that cuts down on cell culture time by half. The cells are frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed on demand to produce matured RBCs in only 11 days, removing the need for continuous 23-day manufacturing. The team also designed complementary technology for more targeted cell sorting and purification. (2020-09-14)

The web of death
Cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death. Chemotherapy is often used as a treatment, but also brings side effects for healthy organs. Scientists around David Ng, group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, are now trying to take a completely different approach: By means of targeted and localized disruption of the cancer cells' structure, its self-destruction mechanism can be activated. In laboratory experiments, they have already demonstrated initial successes. (2020-09-10)

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (2020-09-10)

Small proteins against SARS-CoV-2 neutralize infection in cell culture
Using innovative computer-based approaches, researchers have developed protein inhibitors that block the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 virus and human cell receptor ACE2. (2020-09-09)

An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them. Researchers at the University of Delaware have discovered that bacterial cells from different species can combine into unique hybrid cells by fusing their cell walls and membranes and sharing cellular contents, including proteins and ribonucleic acid (RNA), the molecules which regulate gene expression and control cell metabolism. (2020-09-02)

Differing diets of bonobo groups may offer insights into how culture is created
Besides humans, many other social animals are believed to exhibit forms of culture in various ways, too. According to a new study led by Harvard primatologists Liran Samuni and Martin Surbeck, bonobos, one of our closest living relatives, could be the latest addition to the list. (2020-09-01)

New hydrogels for T-cell growth to be used in cancer immunotherapy
A team with the participation of researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has designed new hydrogels that allow the culture of T-cells or T-lymphocytes, cells of the immune system that are used in cancer immunotherapy since they have the capacity to destroy tumor cells. These hydrogels can mimic lymph nodes, where T-cells reproduce and, therefore, provide high rates of cell proliferation. (2020-08-31)

Fresh tumor biopsies in world-first technique for cancer treatments
An innovative technique to improve cancer treatments using tumour biopsies less than 30 minutes after they're taken has been developed at The University of Queensland. (2020-08-24)

A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging. (2020-08-21)

Key molecule responsible for poor prognosis of breast cancer identified
Hokkaido University scientists have shown that Interleukin-34 is a prognostic marker and drug target for Triple Negative Breast Cancer. (2020-08-21)

Molecule secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts promotes anticancer drug resistance
Joint research at Kumamoto University in Japan discovered a new mechanism for anticancer drug resistance in gastric cancer. Experiments clarified that the Annexin A6 molecule contained in extracellular vesicles (EVs) is secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and taken up by gastric cancer cells, resulting in resistance to anticancer drug treatment. New drug development that targets Annexin A6 and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) may be possible. (2020-08-21)

Machine learning reveals role of culture in shaping meanings of words
What do we mean by the word beautiful? It depends not only on whom you ask, but in what language you ask them. According to a machine learning analysis of dozens of languages conducted at Princeton University, the meaning of words does not necessarily refer to an intrinsic, essential constant. Instead, it is significantly shaped by culture, history and geography. (2020-08-17)

Targeting a conserved cell pathway may offer treatments for numerous viruses, including SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified a small molecule that inhibits multiple different viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, in tissue culture and in mice by targeting the same signaling pathway. By identifying a host cell pathway that a wide variety of viruses rely on for successful infection, the findings suggest a possible target for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. (2020-08-14)

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