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Current Cell Phone News and Events, Cell Phone News Articles.
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A child's brain activity reveals their memory ability
A child's unique brain activity reveals how good their memories are, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-05-25)
Should schools go screen-free
A new paper in JAMA Network Open found that most middle and high schools have cell phone use policies, mostly restricting use in classrooms but not during lunch/recess. (2020-05-18)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
Mobile phones found to host cocktail of live germs, aiding spread of diseases
A new study warns mobile phones could be acting as 'Trojan horses' for coronavirus and urges billions of users worldwide to decontaminate their devices daily. (2020-04-28)
Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. (2020-04-23)
A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. (2020-04-22)
Illuminating the future of renewable energy
A new chemical compound created by researchers at West Virginia University is lighting the way for renewable energy. (2020-04-13)
Climate change triggers Great Barrier Reef bleaching
The Great Barrier Reef is suffering through its worst bleaching event. (2020-04-07)
China's control measures may have prevented 700,000 COVID-19 cases
China's control measures during the first 50 days of the COVID-19 epidemic may have delayed the spread of the virus to cities outside of Wuhan by several days and prevented more than 700,000 infections nationwide, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-03-31)
Solving a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing, part two:
Two Iowa State engineers, who announced the solution to a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing last fall, have followed up with more research results. (2020-03-25)
'Surfing attack' hacks Siri, Google with ultrasonic waves
Using ultrasound waves propagating through a solid surface, researchers at Washington University in St. (2020-02-27)
Newly discovered driver of plant cell growth contradicts current theories
The shape and growth of plant cells may not rely on increased fluidic pressure, or turgor, inside the cell as previously believed. (2020-02-27)
Scientists discover that human cell function removes extracellular amyloid protein
The accumulation of aberrant proteins in the body will cause various neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-02-18)
LTE vulnerability: Attackers can impersonate other mobile phone users
Exploiting a vulnerability in the mobile communication standard LTE, also known as 4G, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum can impersonate mobile phone users. (2020-02-17)
Very tough and essential for survival
The brains of most fish and amphibian species contain a pair of conspicuously large nerve cells. (2020-02-13)
Thyroid cancer, genetic variations, cell phones linked in YSPH study
Radiation from cell phones is associated with higher rates of thyroid cancer among people with genetic variations in specific genes, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-02-12)
Silica increases water availability for plants
As a result of climate change, more frequent and longer drought periods are predicted in the future. (2020-02-12)
Telehealth interventions associated with improved obstetric outcomes
Physician-researchers at the George Washington University published a review suggesting that telehealth interventions are associated with improved obstetric outcomes. (2020-02-11)
Parkinson's and the immune system
Mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of hereditary forms of Parkinson's disease. (2020-02-05)
Kiss and run: How cells sort and recycle their components
What can be reused and what can be disposed of? (2020-01-27)
Nano-thin flexible touchscreens could be printed like newspaper
Taking a thin film common in cell phone touchscreens, researchers have used liquid metal chemistry to shrink it from 3D to 2D. (2020-01-24)
Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together
For the first time, research shows that the contacts between cells, known as cell adhesion, are essential for cells to survive stress. (2020-01-16)
Using voice analysis to track the wellness of patients with mental illness
A new study finds that an interactive voice application using artificial intelligence is as accurate at tracking the wellbeing of patients being treated for serious mental illness as their own physicians. (2020-01-15)
First robust cell culture model for the hepatitis E virus
A mutation switches the turbo on during virus replication. This is a blessing for research. (2020-01-13)
The Vikings erected a runestone out of fear of a climate catastrophe
Several passages on the Rök stone -- the world's most famous Viking Age runic monument -- suggest that the inscription is about battles and for over a hundred years, researchers have been trying to connect the inscription with heroic deeds in war. (2020-01-09)
UNC expert helps treat astronaut's blood clot during NASA mission
Moll was the only non-NASA physician NASA consulted when it was discovered that an astronaut aboard the ISS had a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) -- or blood clot -- in the jugular vein of their neck. (2020-01-02)
Cell phone injuries
Cell phones are mainstays of daily life. This observational study analyzed 20 years of data on people who went to emergency departments with head and neck injuries from cell phone use to estimate the number of injuries, learn what types of injuries there were, and understand how the injuries occurred, such as from distracted driving or walking. (2019-12-05)
Cellphone distraction linked to increase in head injuries
Head and neck injuries incurred while driving or walking with a cellphone are on the rise -- and correlates with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 and release of Pokémon Go in 2016, a Rutgers study found. (2019-12-05)
Siting cell towers needs careful planning
The health impacts of radio-frequency radiation (RFR) are still inconclusive, but the data to date warrants more caution in placing cell towers. (2019-12-03)
A trick for taming terahertz transmissions
Osaka University researchers have invented a wireless communication receiver that can operate in the terahertz frequency band. (2019-12-02)
Mapping disease outbreaks in urban settings using mobile phone data
A new EPFL and MIT study into the interplay between mobility and the 2013 and 2014 dengue outbreaks in Singapore has uncovered a legal void around access to mobile phone data -- information that can prove vital in preventing the spread of infectious diseases. (2019-11-15)
Design flaw could open Bluetooth devices to hacking
Mobile apps that work with Bluetooth devices have an inherent design flaw that makes them vulnerable to hacking, new research has found. (2019-11-14)
Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukaemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes. (2019-11-13)
Discovered a new process of antitumor response of NK cells in myeloma
The stem cell transplant and cell immunotherapy group of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute reveals how NK cells activate a set of actions that promote their antitumor capacity in the presence of myeloma cells. (2019-11-05)
Measuring cell-cell forces using snapshots from time-lapse videos of cells
A new computational method can measure the forces cells exert on each other by analyzing time-lapse videos of cell colonies. (2019-11-05)
'I Snapchat and drive!'
Researchers from the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q) at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) surveyed drivers aged 17 to 25 and found one in six used the social app Snapchat while behind the wheel. (2019-10-18)
Daily exposure to blue light may accelerate aging, even if it doesn't reach your eyes
Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it's not shining in your eyes. (2019-10-17)
New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects
Developed at Brown University, a new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there. (2019-10-16)
Engineers solve 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing
Engineers Alexander Stoytchev and Vladimir Sukhoy have solved a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing. (2019-10-10)
3 in 5 parents say their teen has been in a car with a distracted teen driver
More than 1/2 of parents say their child has probably been in an unsafe situation as a passenger with a teen driver. (2019-09-16)
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