Current Cell Division News and Events

Current Cell Division News and Events, Cell Division News Articles.
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Defects in mitochondria may explain many health problems observed during space travel
Using data collected from a number of different resources, a multidisciplinary team is reporting discovery of a common thread that drives this damage: mitochondrial dysfunction. The researchers used a systems approach to look at widespread alterations affecting biological function. The findings are reported November 25 in the journal Cell. (2020-11-25)

Near-infrared probe decodes telomere dynamics
A new synthetic probe offers a safe and straightforward approach for visualizing chromosome tips in living cells. The probe was designed by scientists at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Science (iCeMS) and colleagues at Kyoto University, and could advance research into aging and a wide range of diseases, including cancers. The details were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-11-20)

Discovery illuminates how cell growth pathway responds to signals
A basic science discovery by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveals a fundamental way cells interpret signals from their environment and may eventually pave the way for potential new therapies. (2020-11-20)

Many unresolved questions remain regarding T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2
T cell responses are critical for providing early control and clearance of many viral infections, but there remain many unknowns concerning T cell immunity in COVID-19. Some T cell responses may even have a detrimental impact on the clinical outcome and contribute to long COVID, a phenomenon that affects roughly 10% of COVID-19 patients, causing them to experience an array of symptoms for a month or longer. (2020-11-18)

Relaxing cell divisions
During one lifetime, the human body experiences ten quadrillion cell divisions. This biological process is essential to form and maintain tissues and organs within the body. Now, Professor Carl-Philipp Heisenberg and his team at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria discovered how mechanical tension from surrounding tissue influences the division process. The scientists published their study in the journal Developmental Cell. This study presents an entirely new influence on cell division and could also be important for tumor research. (2020-11-17)

Cell ageing can be slowed by oxidants
At high concentrations, reactive oxygen species - known as oxidants - are harmful to cells in all organisms and have been linked to ageing. But a study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has now shown that low levels of the oxidant hydrogen peroxide can stimulate an enzyme that helps slow down the ageing of yeast cells. (2020-11-09)

Photopharmacology -- light-gated control of the cytoskeleton
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have developed photoresponsive derivatives of the anticancer drug Taxol®, which allow light-based control of cytoskeleton dynamics in neurons. The agents can optically pattern cell division and may elucidate how Taxol acts. (2020-11-06)

Photopharmacology - A light-trigger for the proteasome
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have designed a light-sensitive inhibitor that can control cell division and cell death - and provides a promising approach for studies of essential cellular processes and the development of novel tumor therapies. (2020-10-30)

HSE Faculty of Chemistry scientists discovered new anti-cancer molecule
A group of Moscow scientists has discovered and explained the activity mechanism of a new anti-cancer molecule -- diphenylisoxazole. This molecule has been shown to be effective against human cancer cells. The research, published in the journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, makes it possible to produce an affordable cancer treatment drug. (2020-10-29)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

It's all about the right balance
Collaborative work of research groups at the University of Würzburg and the TU Dresden has provided important new insights for cancer research. (2020-10-21)

Study discovers potential target for treating aggressive cancer cells
New research by a team at Brown University finds that special filaments called vimentin may be key to the spread of some aggressive, chemo-resistant cancer cells. (2020-10-21)

UC studies tobacco use, cancer connection
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified new clues into ways tobacco use impacts patients with kidney cancer. (2020-10-20)

Researchers identify the mechanism behind bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified the mechanism behind bone marrow failure developing in children that suffer from Fanconi anaemia. (2020-10-14)

Blood tests could be developed to help predict pregnancy complications new study suggests
UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. Their preliminary study, appearing in Epigenetics, links certain cell-free DNA signatures to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes. (2020-10-13)

Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
The roles of scientists change as research teams become more interdisciplinary and larger, finds new research from ESMT Berlin. Henry Sauermann, Professor of Strategy at ESMT Berlin, and Prof. Carolin Haeussler from the University of Passau found that division of labor increased with the size of the team, meaning a higher proportion of team members specialized in fewer tasks, sometimes only contributing to one activity. However, generalist members, which are less specialized and contribute to multiple activities, did not disappear completely. (2020-10-07)

Sticking together
In unraveling how a single cell develops into a complex organism, one vexing question has remained for developmental biology: How do robust patterns form in the body? An answer has now been found for the zebrafish neural tube. In this paradigm of patterned tissues, the varying stickiness of cells combined with gradients of signaling molecules is responsible for generating a robust pattern. This is the result of a study published in Science. (2020-10-01)

New method allows precise gene control by light
A novel optical switch makes it possible to precisely control the lifespan of genetic ''copies''. These are used by the cell as building instructions for the production of proteins. The method was developed by researchers from the universities of Bonn and Bayreuth. It may significantly advance the investigation of dynamic processes in living cells. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-09-25)

Divide and enlarge
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow. (2020-09-22)

'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf. (2020-09-17)

Viral load predicts mortality rate in hospitalized patients with cancer and COVID-19
Higher viral loads are associated with a greater risk of death among cancer and non-cancer patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report September 15 in the journal Cancer Cell. Among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, those with hematologic malignancies who had recently been treated for cancer had the highest levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes COVID-19. (2020-09-16)

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (2020-09-10)

New way to target some rapidly dividing cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unharmed
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Oxford say they have found a new way to kill some multiplying human breast cancer cells by selectively attacking the core of their cell division machinery. (2020-09-09)

Oxford University researchers discover 'genetic vulnerability' in breast cancer cells
The study, published in the scientific journal Nature, has uncovered a genetic vulnerability present in nearly 10% percent of all breast cancers tumours, and found a way to target this vulnerability and selectively kill cancer cells. (2020-09-09)

How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists led by Dr. Elisabeth Fischer-Friedrich, group leader at the Excellence Cluster Physics of Life (PoL) and the Biotechnology Center TU Dresden (BIOTEC) studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). (2020-09-02)

Antagonistic genes modify rice plant growth
Rice stems lengthen when a newly identified gene activates during flooding. Another gene suppresses lengthening in shorter varieties. The insight could help plant breeders. (2020-08-26)

Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now, work led by researchers at Stony Brook University. (2020-08-25)

Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells. (2020-08-25)

A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging. (2020-08-21)

Key molecule responsible for poor prognosis of breast cancer identified
Hokkaido University scientists have shown that Interleukin-34 is a prognostic marker and drug target for Triple Negative Breast Cancer. (2020-08-21)

Vaccine that harnesses antifungal immunity protects mice from staph infection
Immunization of mice with a new vaccine consisting of fungal particles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) proteins protects mice against S. aureus infection, according to a study published August 20 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Underhill of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleague. (2020-08-20)

Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
A Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven) finds that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence this cell fate switch during a precise period that is twice as long in humans compared to mice. This highlights an unexpected function for mitochondria that may help explain how humans developed a bigger brain during evolution, and how mitochondrial defects lead to neurodevelopmental diseases. (2020-08-13)

CNIO and CNIC find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development
In 1998, Spanish researcher Ana Losada, currently at CNIO, identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein essential for chromosome segregation in dividing cells. Today, we know that cohesin has a role in cancer * Cohesin is so important that it has been evolutionarily conserved for millions of years * Losada and Paco Real from CNIO, and Miguel Manzanares from CBMSO are publishing their recent findings on the role of cohesin in high-impact journal 'Cell Reports' (2020-08-11)

New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth
A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth. (2020-08-06)

Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. Würzburg researchers have clarified how the pathogenic bacteria obtain this substance. (2020-08-03)

Huntsman Cancer Institute illuminates potential new treatment in acute myeloid leukemia
In a study published in the journal Leukemia, lead author Ami Patel, MD, Huntsman Cancer Institute researcher and assistant professor in the Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies at the University of Utah, showed that factors produced by bone marrow support cells allowed leukemia cells to survive treatment with quizartinib, a type of TKI. When quizartinib was combined with another TKI called dasatinib the alternative survival pathways were shut down, leading to more effective leukemia cell death. (2020-07-31)

Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression
Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy - a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors. (2020-07-24)

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation. This enables Staphylococcus aureus bacteria to develop antibiotic resistance and improve their chances of survival. (2020-07-22)

Perspective: T cell responses to COVID-19 are a crucial target for research
While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus - addressing a crucial knowledge gap, say Daniel Altmann and Rosemary Boyton in a new Perspective. (2020-07-17)

Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found. (2020-07-09)

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