Current Cell Division News and Events | Page 2

Current Cell Division News and Events, Cell Division News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
New clues to lung-scarring disease may aid treatment
Scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona, have discovered previously unreported genetic and cellular changes that occur in the lungs of people with pulmonary fibrosis (PF). (2020-07-08)

Limitations of super-resolution microscopy overcome
The smallest cell structures can now be imaged even better: The combination of two microscopy methods makes fluorescence imaging with molecular resolution possible for the first time. (2020-07-07)

The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished. This morphology would be useful to identify cells that have chromosomal instability inherent in cancer cells. (2020-07-07)

Protein linked to cancer acts as a viscous glue in cell division
The protein PRC1, a telltale sign in many cancer types including prostate, ovarian, and breast cancer, act as a ''viscous glue'' during cell division, precisely controlling the speed at which two sets of DNA are separated as a single cell divides. The finding could explain why too much or too little PRC1 disrupts that process and causes genome errors linked to cancer. (2020-07-07)

Oncotarget: Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning can drive resistance to EMT
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning during cell division can drive resistance to EMT'' by Jia et al. which reported that Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process mesenchymal-epithelial transition are central to metastatic aggressiveness and therapy resistance in solid tumors. (2020-07-07)

Host cell fusion in bacteria infection alarms immune system, causing host cell destruction
NUS Medicine researchers have identified a new trigger for our immune system--abnormal fusion of host cells to form giant cells after infection by pathogens such as the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cell fusion triggered the cGAS-STING pathway, activating a type 1 interferon response which kills pathogens. In extensive cell fusion, cGAS-STING caused the giant cells to self-destruct instead. Since the DNA in the giant cells was damaged, self-destruction likely prevents these cells from becoming cancerous. (2020-07-07)

Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)

How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell, reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen plays a critical role in regulating the size of scar tissue in the heart. (2020-07-03)

CNIO team develop a technology to improve effectiveness of stem cells in regenerative medicine
Stem cells have been holding great promise for regenerative medicine for years. However, one of the main limitations in the application of these therapies is the quality of the stem cells that can be generated in the laboratory. Now, a team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has developed a new, simple and fast technology that enhances in vitro and in vivo the potential of stem cells to differentiate into adult cells. (2020-07-02)

High-end microscopy refined
New details are known about an important cell structure: For the first time, two W├╝rzburg research groups have been able to map the synaptonemal complex three-dimensionally with a resolution of 20 to 30 nanometres. (2020-07-01)

A new antibiotic binding site was found in the ribosome
A group of scientists from Russia, Germany and the United States, led by Skoltech scientists Ilya Osterman, Petr Sergiev, Olga Dontsova and Daniel Wilson from Hamburg University, studied the mechanism by which tetracenomycin X works, blocking the process of protein synthesis in bacteria. It turned out that it acts differently from the well-known antibiotic tetracycline, which gives good prospects for overcoming antibiotic resistance in bacteria. (2020-06-29)

USC scientists examine the impact of a very specific defect in DNA replication
The new lab study finds an unexpected glitch in a gene that supervises mitosis, one that has important implications for cancer treatment. (2020-06-29)

New protein complex gets chromosomes sorted
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division. The complex, NWC, is made up of three proteins: NOL11, WDR43, and Cirhin. In the absence of NWC, Aurora B did not accumulate at centromeres, and chromosome movement and alignment were impaired. Together, these results show that NWC is required for faithful chromosome segregation. (2020-06-26)

Starved cancer cells became more sensitive to chemotherapy
By preventing sugar uptake, researchers succeeded in increasing the cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapeutic treatment. The studies, led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, were carried out on cancer cells in a lab environment. The results were recently published in the research journal Haematologica. (2020-06-23)

Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth
When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should. For the first time, scientists now understand how a protein called TANGLED1 can lead to accurate cell division in plants. (2020-06-22)

Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division. (2020-06-22)

Study led by City of Hope, TGen shows new way of ID'ing tumor response to immunotherapy
Scientists at City of Hope, working in collaboration with researchers at Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), have found that the actions of circulating immune cells -- namely how they differentiate and signal -- at the start of immunotherapy treatment for cancer can inform how a patient will respond to the therapy. The team's findings will publish this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. (2020-06-22)

Researchers study a novel type of extracellular vesicles
Researchers from Sechenov University and the University of Pittsburgh compared the properties of two groups of extracellular vesicles. Either present in a liquid phase or attached to the fibres of the extracellular matrix, these vesicles facilitate metabolism and cell-cell communication. A better understanding of their structure, production and movement can help create new bioengineered materials and repair damaged tissues more quickly. Findings are published in Science Advances. (2020-06-18)

Putting 'super' in natural killer cells
Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and deleting a key gene, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have created natural killer cells -- a type of immune cell -- with measurably stronger activity against a form of leukemia, both in vivo and in vitro. (2020-06-11)

Women's communication shapes division of labor in household
For many couples, COVID-19 quarantine has shattered the normal routine and led some to renegotiate who does what around the house. A new study led a team that analyzed the role that communication plays in the division of household labor. They found that partner communication is the most important factor linking the division of household labor to satisfaction in the relationship. But the way that the partners' communication matters depends on gender. (2020-06-09)

T cell immunity in the elderly
A study by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) expands the understanding of the molecular pathways that control T cell function and survival and how it relates to declining T cell immunity in the elderly. (2020-06-05)

How cells solve their identity crisis
Cancer is often the result of DNA mutations or problems with how cells divide, which can lead to cells 'forgetting' what type of cell they are or how to function properly. Now, Professor Martin Hetzer and a team of scientists have provided clarity into how new cells remember their identity after cell division. These memory mechanisms could explicate problems that occur when cell identity is not maintained, such as cancer. (2020-06-04)

Tracking cancer's immortality factor
Canadian researchers discover how a key cancer mutation activates telomerase, the 'anti-aging enzyme' that makes tumour cells immortal. (2020-06-03)

Researchers identify key immune checkpoint protein that operates within T cells
A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) has identified a protein within certain immune cells that is required for optimal immune responses to cancer. The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, also suggest that the protein might be useful for predicting which cancer patients are less likely to respond to the form of therapy called immune checkpoint blockade. (2020-06-01)

Directed protein evolution with CRISPR-Cas9
New area of application for gene scissors: Optimized proteins for biomedical research. (2020-05-26)

New liver cancer research targets non-cancer cells to blunt tumor growth
'Senotherapy,' a treatment that uses small molecule drugs to target ''senescent'' cells, or those cells that no longer undergo cell division, blunts liver tumor progression in animal models according to new research from a team led by Celeste Simon, PhD, a professor of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute. The study was published in Nature Cell Biology. (2020-05-20)

Virus protein discovery reveals new plant-animal class of cell division disruptors
Recently, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a plant viral protein named 17K that disrupts host cell division to promote its own propagation in infected tissues. They also linked it structurally to certain animal virus proteins. (2020-05-13)

Researchers find protein that helps cancer cells to survive
In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered two important functions of a protein called RTEL1 during cell division. The researchers hope that the new knowledge will help to find new cancer treatments. (2020-05-12)

Dock and harbor: A novel mechanism for controlling genes
In a recent study published in Molecular Cell, researchers at Kanazawa University report the role of cellular structures called PML bodies in regulating gene function. (2020-05-12)

First simulation of a full-sized mitochondrial membrane
Scientists from the University of Groningen have developed a method that combines different resolution levels in a computer simulation of biological membranes. Their algorithm backmaps a large-scale model that includes features, such as membrane curvature, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This has allowed them to zoom in on toxin-induced membrane budding and to simulate a full-sized mitochondrial lipid membrane. Their approach opens the way to whole-cell simulations at a molecular level. (2020-05-08)

Protein shredder regulates fat metabolism in the brain
A protein shredder that occurs in cell membranes of brain cells apparently also indirectly regulates the fat metabolism. This is shown by a recent study by the University of Bonn. The shredder, known as gamma-secretase, is considered a possible target for drugs against cancer and Alzheimer's disease. However, the results suggest that such agents may have long-range effects that need to be watched closely. The study has now been published in ''Life Science Alliance''. (2020-05-08)

Lipid metabolism controls brain development
A lipid metabolism enzyme controls brain stem cell activity and lifelong brain development. If the enzyme does not work correctly, it causes learning and memory deficits in humans and mice, as researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered. Regulating stem cell activity via lipid metabolism could lead to new treatments for brain diseases. (2020-05-07)

Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth
Publication in Cell: Researchers at the Universit├ę libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover the mechanisms mediating postnatal tissue development. They found that a unique developmental stem cell population mediates tissue expansion by a constant self-duplication throughout postnatal development. (2020-04-29)

Researchers find new insights linking cell division to cancer
Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) published research in the journal Nature extending our understanding of the intricate process of cell division. (2020-04-29)

Discovered the physiological mechanisms underlying the most common pediatric Leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute unveil the mechanisms that lead to hyperdiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hyper D-ALL, the most common pediatric B-cell Leukaemia. (2020-04-23)

A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Susanne Hellmuth and Olaf Stemmann from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells. It protects from cancer that can develop as a result of irregular distribution of genetic information to daughter cells. The enzyme separase plays a central role in these processes. The findings published in ''Nature'' offer promising approaches for cancer therapy. (2020-04-23)

Helping the heart heal itself
UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have discovered a protein that works with others during development to put the brakes on cell division in the heart, they report today in Nature. (2020-04-22)

Unprecedented single-cell studies in virtual embryo
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and from the University of Padua School of Medicine have created the first complete description of early embryo development, accounting for every single cell in the embryo. This 'virtual embryo' will help to answer how the different cell types in an organism can originate from a single egg cell. The results are published on 20 April in the journal Cell. (2020-04-20)

Stem cells in human embryos commit to specialization surprisingly early
The point when human embryonic stem cells irreversibly commit to becoming specialised has been identified by researchers at the Francis Crick Institute. (2020-04-17)

Single cell division error may be responsible for complexity in cancer genomes
A single error in cell division related to the formation of a chromosome bridge can trigger a cascade of mutational events, rapidly generating many of the defining features of cancer genomes, a new study suggests. (2020-04-16)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.