Current Cell News and Events

Current Cell News and Events, Cell News Articles.
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Many unresolved questions remain regarding T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2
T cell responses are critical for providing early control and clearance of many viral infections, but there remain many unknowns concerning T cell immunity in COVID-19. Some T cell responses may even have a detrimental impact on the clinical outcome and contribute to long COVID, a phenomenon that affects roughly 10% of COVID-19 patients, causing them to experience an array of symptoms for a month or longer. (2020-11-18)

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (2020-09-10)

A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging. (2020-08-21)

New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth
A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth. (2020-08-06)

Perspective: T cell responses to COVID-19 are a crucial target for research
While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus - addressing a crucial knowledge gap, say Daniel Altmann and Rosemary Boyton in a new Perspective. (2020-07-17)

Multisample technique to analyze cell adhesion
An assay for imaging the physical interactions between multiple cell populations could help cancer research and treatment assessment. (2020-07-06)

T cell immunity in the elderly
A study by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) expands the understanding of the molecular pathways that control T cell function and survival and how it relates to declining T cell immunity in the elderly. (2020-06-05)

Newly discovered driver of plant cell growth contradicts current theories
The shape and growth of plant cells may not rely on increased fluidic pressure, or turgor, inside the cell as previously believed. (2020-02-27)

Cells protect themselves against stress by keeping together
For the first time, research shows that the contacts between cells, known as cell adhesion, are essential for cells to survive stress. The findings also suggest that impaired cell adhesion may sensitize cancer cells to drugs that damage cell proteins and cause stress. (2020-01-16)

Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukaemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes. (2019-11-13)

Discovered a new process of antitumor response of NK cells in myeloma
The stem cell transplant and cell immunotherapy group of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute reveals how NK cells activate a set of actions that promote their antitumor capacity in the presence of myeloma cells. (2019-11-05)

Measuring cell-cell forces using snapshots from time-lapse videos of cells
A new computational method can measure the forces cells exert on each other by analyzing time-lapse videos of cell colonies. It could enable researchers to gain fundamental insights into what role intercellular forces play in cellular biology and how they differ in healthy and diseased states. (2019-11-05)

Seeing is believing: Monitoring real time changes during cell division
Scientist have cast new light on the behaviour of tiny hair-like structures called cilia found on almost every cell in the body. Cilia play important roles in human development and disease. Akin to tiny antennae, they act as cell timers keeping the brakes on cell division until the right growth cues are received. Malfunction of cilia leads to many human diseases such as polycystic kidney disease and cancer. (2018-11-19)

Zika in high resolution
The highest-resolution image yet of the Zika virus, or any enveloped virus thus far, appears June 26 in the journal Structure. The scientists used the latest electron microscopy techniques to see the atomic details of the Zika virus structure. They took advantage of Zika virus stability compared to its flavivirus cousins, allowing for a particularly accurate three-dimensional atomic model. (2018-06-26)

Why do we need one pair of genome?
Scientists have unraveled how the cell replication process destabilizes when it has more, or less, than a pair of chromosome sets, each of which is called a genome -- a major step toward understanding chromosome instability in cancer cells. (2018-05-24)

Colon cancer -- Targeting tumor cell plasticity
Cell type switch helps colon cancer evade treatment, a study suggests. (2018-05-16)

Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease
Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers). (2018-04-19)

Type-2 diabetes: Insulin held up in traffic
In a new study, researchers from the universities of Uppsala and Lund show why insulin secretion is not working properly in patients suffering from type-2 diabetes. The report is published in the journal Cell Metabolism. (2018-02-06)

Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrow
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell. (2018-01-11)

Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers from Germany and the United States describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells in the journal Developmental Cell. (2017-11-20)

Scientists figure out how cell division timer works
Human cells use a timer to divide: each cell gets at least 30 minutes to divide its genetic material between the nuclei of two daughter cells. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have unravelled how this timer is switched on and off. Their findings open up perspectives for the treatment of cancer, as keeping the timer going would stop cancer cells from dividing. (2017-11-09)

Computer program detects differences between human cells
'How many different cell types are there in a human body? And how do these differences develop? Nobody really knows,' says Professor Stein Aerts from KU Leuven and VIB, Belgium. But thanks to a new method developed by his team, that may be about to change. (2017-10-09)

New study offers novel treatment strategy for patients with colon cancer
Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In a new study, researchers demonstrate for the first time that a previously uncharacterized protein is increased in colon cancer. The protein is immunoglobulin containing proline rich receptor-1 (IGPR-1) which was recently identified in the same laboratory as a cell adhesion molecule. (2017-09-20)

Researchers find 'internal clock' within live human cells
A team of scientists has revealed an internal clock within live human cells, a finding that creates new opportunities for understanding the building blocks of life and the onset of disease. (2017-09-11)

New Zealand researchers makes 'natural born killer' cell discovery
An unexpected role for a white blood cell called the Natural Killer (NK) cell -- a critical cell for ridding the body of infection and cancer, has been discovered by researchers t New Zealand's University of Otago. The NK cell is a 'vigilante' killer -- a white blood cell that destroys invaders and cancer cells through a process of 'identity card' checking. The researchers' new work shows that violent vigilante NK cells act as helper cells to start up the immune response. (2017-08-31)

Alcohol intake may increase risk of nonmelanoma skin cancers
In a recent analysis of published studies, higher alcohol intake was linked with an increased risk of both basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, which are nonmelanoma skin cancers. (2017-07-31)

Cannibal cells may limit cancer growth
New research led by scientists at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge reveals a link between cell cannibalism and cancer biology. Cell cannibalism occurs when one cell surrounds, kills and digests another. This latest research reveals that cannibalism can be triggered by cell division; when one cell divides to form two. Since uncontrolled cell division is a key hallmark of cancer, this suggests that cannibalism may have a role to play in resisting cancer. (2017-07-11)

Discovery of a new mechanism involved in the migration of cancer cells
A team of young French researchers has discovered a new mechanism which facilitates cell migration. On the surface of its membrane, the cell develops multiple small hooks which help it to attach to fibers outside the cell and move along them. This action helps us to understand better how a cell escapes from the tumor mass and moves around the body to form a new focus. (2017-06-22)

Solar cell design with over 50 percent energy-conversion efficiency
Solar cells convert the sun's energy into electricity by converting photons into electrons. A new solar cell design could raise the energy conversion efficiency to over 50 percent by absorbing the spectral components of longer wavelengths that are usually lost during transmission through the cell. These findings were published on April 6 in the online edition of Nature Communications. (2017-04-23)

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout
Talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance. (2017-01-13)

New book on The Cytoskeleton from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
'The Cytoskeleton', from CSHLPress, presents a comprehensive and up-to-date view of the cytoskeleton, cataloguing its many different components and explaining how they are functionally integrated in different cellular processes. It starts by laying out the basic molecular hardware, before describing in detail how these components are assembled in cells and linked to neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix to maintain tissue architecture. It then surveys the roles of the cytoskeleton in processes such as intracellular transport, among others. (2016-12-09)

Visualization of the behavior of sugar transport proteins
A group of researchers at Osaka University clarified the role of a N-glycan chain on glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) by developing a method for visualizing intracellular trafficking of proteins. This group's achievement will lead to the clarification of the mechanism behind the localization of GLUT4 and the mechanism for developing diabetes, as well as the development of new types of treatment drugs. (2016-11-16)

New insights into tumor-infiltrating T cells
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have identified a distinct gene module for T cell dysfunction distinct from activation in tumor-infiltrating T cells, thus paving the way for the development of new precision therapeutics. (2016-09-08)

CAR-T cell therapy makes strides in clinic *free*
In a phase 1 clinical study of 32 participants with advanced B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, immunotherapy with defined subsets of T cells, rather than whole T cell populations, showed strong antitumor activity. (2016-09-07)

Widely used brain cancer cell line faces identity crisis
A cell line considered to be the most commonly used in brain cancer research is different from the original patient tumor from which it was derived, say Bengt Westermark and colleagues, who first established the cell line nearly 50 years ago. (2016-08-31)

Forensic DNA analysis checks the origin of cultured cells
Cell lines are cultured cells that are commonly used in medical research. New results from Uppsala University show that such cells are not always what they are assumed to be. Using genetic analyses, the researchers showed that a commonly used cell line which was established in Uppsala almost 50 years ago does not originate from the patient it is claimed to stem from. The findings are published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2016-08-31)

Neural stem cells control their own fate
To date, it has been assumed that the differentiation of stem cells depends on the environment they are embedded in. A research group at the University of Basel now describes for the first time a mechanism by which hippocampal neural stem cells regulate their own cell fate via the protein Drosha. The journal Cell Stem Cell has published their results. (2016-08-18)

Discovery of a unique subcellular structure determining the orientation of cell division
The work by Negishi et al., published recently in the electronic journal eLife, has revealed that in the sea squirt embryo, the orientation of the cell division machinery in epithelial cells is controlled by a unique cell membrane structure, which we call an 'invagination.' (2016-08-12)

Protein pairs make cells remember
Even single cells are able to remember information if they receive the order from their proteins. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered that proteins form pairs to give the signal for storing information in the cell's memory. The results of the study have now been published in Cell Reports. (2016-07-15)

Protein pairs make cells remember
Even single cells are able to remember information if they receive the order from their proteins. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have discovered that proteins form pairs to give the signal for storing information in the cell's memory. The results of the study have now been published in Cell Reports. (2016-07-14)

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