Current Cellphones News and Events

Current Cellphones News and Events, Cellphones News Articles.
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New nanostructured alloy for anode is a big step toward revolutionizing energy storage
Researchers have developed a battery anode based on a new nanostructured alloy that could revolutionize the way energy storage devices are designed and manufactured. (2021-01-11)

A multishot lensless camera in development could aid disease diagnosis
A new type of imaging that does not require a lens and uses reconfigurable particle-based masks to take multiple shots of an object is being developed by researchers at Penn State. The electric-field directed self-assembling mask technology is expected to have uses in lower-cost and faster disease diagnosis, the enhancement of optical microscopy, and may even lead to thinner cellphone technology. (2020-09-23)

Shaking light with sound
Combining integrated photonics and MEMS technology, scientists from EPFL and Purdue University demonstrate monolithic piezoelectric control of integrated optical frequency combs with bulk acoustic waves. The technology opens up integrated ultrafast acousto-optic modulation for demanding applications. (2020-07-15)

New cobalt-free lithium-ion battery reduces costs without sacrificing performance
Researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin say they've cracked the code to a cobalt-free high-energy lithium-ion battery, eliminating the cobalt and opening the door to reducing the costs of producing batteries while boosting performance in some ways. (2020-07-15)

Next-generation batteries take major step toward commercial viability
A group of researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has found a way to stabilize one of the most challenging parts of lithium-sulfur batteries, bringing the technology closer to becoming commercially viable. (2020-04-28)

Tiny sensors fit 30,000 to a penny, transmit data from living tissue
Cornell University researchers who build nanoscale electronics have developed microsensors so tiny, they can fit 30,000 on one side of a penny. They are equipped with an integrated circuit, solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that enable them to harness light for power and communication. And because they are mass fabricated, with up to 1 million sitting on an 8-inch wafer, each device costs a fraction of that same penny. (2020-04-22)

'Surfing attack' hacks Siri, Google with ultrasonic waves
Using ultrasound waves propagating through a solid surface, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis were able to read text messages and make fraudulent calls on a cellphone sitting on a desk up to 30 feet away. (2020-02-27)

Grabbing atoms
In a first for quantum physics, University of Otago researchers have 'held' individual atoms in place and observed previously unseen complex atomic interactions. (2020-02-19)

Low power metal detector senses magnetic fingerprints
Recent studies have shown metallic objects have their own magnetic fingerprints based on size, shape and physical composition. In AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, scientists look to leverage these observations to potentially create a smaller and cheaper system that is just as effective as their larger counterparts. (2020-01-21)

Science snapshots -- Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data
As reported in Nature Physics, a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists was the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire; superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties. (2019-10-10)

Stevens researchers to develop handheld device to diagnose skin cancer
Using shortwave rays installed in cellphones and airport security scanners, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that detects skin lesions and determines whether they are cancerous or benign -- a technology that could ultimately be incorporated into a handheld device that could rapidly diagnose skin cancer without a scalpel in sight. (2019-09-17)

Need a mental break? Avoid your cellphone, Rutgers researchers say
Using a cellphone to take a break during mentally challenging tasks does not allow the brain to recharge effectively and may result in poorer performance, Rutgers researchers found. (2019-08-19)

Scientists develop way to perform supercomputer simulations of the heart on cellphones
You can now perform supercomputer simulations of the heart's electrophysiology in real time on desktop computers and even cellphones. A team of scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech developed a new approach that can not only help diagnose heart conditions and test new treatments, but pushes the boundaries of cardiac science by opening up a floodgate of new cardiac research and education. (2019-03-29)

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations. (2018-12-10)

Brain-inspired methods to improve wireless communications
Researchers Lingjia Liu and Yang (Cindy) Yi are using brain-inspired machine learning techniques to increase the energy efficiency of wireless receivers. (2018-10-30)

UT engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors
Engineers at UT Austin develop world's first method for controlling the motion of nanomotors with simple visible light as the stimulus. (2018-09-19)

Nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers text while driving
The study examined individual- and state-level factors associated with texting while driving among teens from 35 states. Researchers found that nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers age 14 years and older had texted while driving at least once in the month prior to the survey. (2018-08-20)

Distracted pedestrians walk slower and are less steady on their feet: UBC study
University of British Columbia engineers have analyzed just how mobile device use affects pedestrians, and their findings could help develop safer roads and autonomous cars in the future. (2018-07-31)

Wearable device can predict older adults' risk of falling
Every year, more than one in three individuals aged 65 and older will experience a fall. Treatment and awareness of falling usually happens after a fall has already occurred. As a part of the NIH's Women's Health Initiative, researchers at the University of Illinois wanted to see if they could predict an individual's risk of falling so that preventative measures could be taken to reduce this risk. (2018-07-12)

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds
A cross-campus collaboration led by Ulrich Wiesner, professor of engineering in the at Cornell University, addresses this demand with a novel energy storage device architecture that has the potential for lightning-quick charges. The group's idea: Instead of having the batteries' anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator, intertwine the components in a self-assembling, 3D gyroidal structure, with thousands of nanoscale pores filled with the elements necessary for energy storage and delivery. (2018-05-17)

Recycling experts hit milestone in quest for zero-waste phone
UBC researchers have perfected a process to efficiently separate fiberglass and resin -- two of the most commonly discarded parts of a cellphone -- bringing them closer to their goal of a zero-waste cellphone. (2018-04-12)

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteries
They die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have developed a high-powered, environmentally safe lithium-sulfur substitute that could drastically lengthen battery life. Their work has been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2018-03-27)

Laws banning hand-held cellphone calls more effective than texting bans for teen drivers
This study looked at state-level cellphone laws and differences in both texting and hand-held cellphone conversations among teen drivers across four years. Teen drivers reported 55% fewer hand-held phone conversations when universal hand-held calling bans were in place compared to state with no bans. Universal texting bans did not fully discourage teens from texting while driving. (2018-02-21)

Reinventing the inductor
A basic building block of modern technology, inductors are everywhere: cellphones, laptops, radios, televisions, cars. And surprisingly, they are essentially the same today as in 1831, when they were first created by English scientist Michael Faraday. (2018-02-21)

Rapid cellphone charging getting closer to reality
The ability to charge cellphones in seconds is one step closer after researchers at the University of Waterloo used nanotechnology to significantly improve energy-storage devices known as supercapacitors. (2017-10-25)

Poll: Despite mobile options and cord-cutting, sports fans still turn on the TV
Despite the growth of mobile technology and viewing options, when sports fans want to watch a game, they turn to traditional live TV, according to results of a UMass Lowell-Washington Post poll released today. (2017-10-18)

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level. It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add 'smart,' wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects -- like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals -- that curve, bend, stretch and move. (2017-09-28)

Study links violence exposure, obesity in teens
Teens consumed more unhealthy foods and beverages on days they were exposed to violence, and suffered from fatigue due to poor sleep the following day, according to a new study by Duke researchers. Those behaviors, especially increased soda consumption, are important predictors of weight gain. (2017-07-31)

Rice U. scientists map ways forward for lithium-ion batteries for extreme environments
Rice University materials scientists map the possibilities to improve commercial lithium-ion batteries expected to operate in extreme hot or cold. (2017-07-26)

Artificial intelligence suggests recipes based on food photos
Researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) believe that analyzing photos like these could help us learn recipes and better understand people's eating habits. In a new paper with the Qatar Computing Research Institute (QCRI), the team trained an artificial intelligence system called Pic2Recipe to look at a photo of food and be able to predict the ingredients and suggest similar recipes. (2017-07-21)

Researchers demonstrate new firewall that protects cellphones from security threat
Some 400 million people change their phone's components, such as touchscreens, chargers, and battery or sensor assemblies, which are all susceptible to significant security breaches and attacks. These components, referred to as 'field replaceable units (FRUs),' communicate with the phone CPU over simple interfaces with no authentication mechanisms or error detection capabilities. A malicious vendor could add a compromised FRU to a phone, leaving it vulnerable to password and financial theft, fraud, malicious photo or video distribution, and unauthorized app downloads. (2017-06-29)

Storytime a 'turbocharger' for a child's brain
Evidence shows benefits of shared reading may improve literacy and brain development. (2017-05-31)

Stanford scientist's new approach may accelerate design of high-power batteries
New Stanford study describes a model for designing novel materials used in electrical storage devices, such as car batteries and capacitors. This approach may dramatically accelerate discovery of new materials that provide cheap and efficient ways to store energy. (2017-04-21)

Looking for the next leap in rechargeable batteries
USC researchers may have just found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks to the next wave of rechargeable batteries -- small enough for cellphones and powerful enough for cars. (2017-02-17)

One in 5 adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new University of British Columbia study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission. (2017-01-19)

Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits
An international collaboration between physicists at the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, McGill University, and the University of Konstanz recently demonstrated a new framework for faster control of a quantum bit. First published online Nov. 28, 2016, in Nature Physics, their experiments on a single electron in a diamond chip could create quantum devices that are less to prone to errors when operated at high speeds. (2016-12-15)

Finger swipe-powered phone? We're 1 step closer
The day of charging cellphones with finger swipes and powering Bluetooth headsets simply by walking is now much closer. (2016-12-09)

'Listening' to signals traveling through bridges for diagnosing damage
A group of Clarkson University mathematicians and a civil engineer developed a passive and noninvasive approach to 'listen' to a collection of relevant signals from bridges and other mechanical structures to diagnose changes or damage. (2016-11-29)

For platinum catalysts, tiny squeeze gives big boost in performance, Stanford study says
Squeezing a platinum catalyst a fraction of a nanometer nearly doubles its catalytic activity, a finding that could lead to better fuel cells and other clean energy technologies, say Stanford scientists. The findings are published in the Nov. 25 issue of Science. (2016-11-24)

A study warns of Spanish children's overexposure to 'junk food' ads on TV
Spanish children are overexposed to TV ads of unhealthy food (burgers, pizzas, soft drinks, chocolate, bakery, etc.) both in generalist and children-oriented channels, a situation that could be described as 'worrying' and which promotes childhood obesity. (2016-11-10)

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