Current Cellulose News and Events

Current Cellulose News and Events, Cellulose News Articles.
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Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

Inspired by kombucha tea, engineers create "living materials"
Engineers at MIT and Imperial College London have developed a new way to generate tough, functional materials using a mix of bacteria and yeast similar to the ''kombucha mother'' used to ferment tea. Using this mix, called a Syn-SCOBY (synthetic symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast), they produced cellulose embedded with enzymes that can perform a variety of functions, such as sensing environmental pollutants. (2021-01-11)

Researchers synthesize bio-based Methylcyclopentadiene with 3-Methylcyclopent-2-enone
Scientists from DICP synthesized bio-based MCPD via direct hydrodeoxygenation of 3-methylcyclopent-2-enone (MCP) derived from cellulose. (2021-01-07)

Simple and cost-effective extraction of rare metals from industrial waste
Researchers from Kanazawa University developed a protocol to efficiently purify palladium and silver ions from industrial waste, and convert the ions into pure metallic elements. This will help increase global stock of valuable elements that are widely needed yet in scarce supply. (2020-12-18)

Pulp succeeded in diet? Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Osaka University scientists devise a system for measuring the quality of nanofibrillation for wood pulp using its natural optical birefringence. This work may lead to clear definition and sophisticated utilization of wooden cellulose nanofibers. (2020-12-17)

Proteins enable crop-infecting fungi to 'smell' food
New UC Riverside research shows the same proteins that enable human senses such as smell also allow certain fungi to sense something they can eat. (2020-12-15)

Industrial waste is reused to produce alternatives to plastic
Researchers at São Paulo State University reused bacterial cellulose scraps usually thrown away by manufacturers of wound dressings to make strong biodegradable film for food packaging (2020-12-14)

Sustainable regenerated isotropic wood
A high-performance sustainable regenerated isotropic wood (RGI-wood) is reported, constructed from surface nanocrystallized wood particles (SNWP) by efficient bottom-up strategy. The obtained RGI-wood exceeds the limitation of the anisotropic, inconsistent mechanical properties, and inflammability of natural wood. Mass production of large-sized RGI-wood was achieved, overcoming the rareness of large-sized natural wood. Through this strategy, a series of functional RGI-wood nanocomposites can also be prepared, which show great potential in diverse applications. (2020-11-30)

Algae breathe life into 3D engineered tissues
3D bioprinted algae can be harnessed as a sustainable source of oxygen for human cells in engineered vascularized tissues, researchers report November 18 in the journal Matter. They embedded the bioprinted photosynthetic algae, along with human liver-derived cells, in a 3D hydrogel matrix to create honeycomb-shaped tissues with lobules, similar to the human liver. (2020-11-18)

Newly discovered enzyme helps make valuable bioactive saponins
A team led by researchers from Osaka University discovered a new enzyme, closely related to the CSyGT family of enzymes involved in producing cellulose in plant cell walls. Unexpectedly, they found the new enzyme is responsible for a key step in the biosynthesis of saponins, bioactive products with high-value applications in medicine and the food industry. The new enzyme opens up novel routes for commercial production of these valuable compounds in microbial cells. (2020-11-16)

Plant inspired: Printing self-folding paper structures for future mechatronics
Natural motion in plants occurs because of cellulose fibers absorbing and releasing water. Now, scientists from Shibaura Institute of Technology and Waseda University, Japan, derive a simple methodology to produce self-folding origami structures based on this concept. Their method, which requires only a standard inkjet printer, could soon allow for the easy fabrication of tailor-made mechatronic devices, enabling novel applications in the healthcare, space, energy, and agriculture fields. (2020-11-09)

Tough, strong and heat-endure: Bioinspired material to oust plastics
Being tougher, stronger and more adaptive to heat, a new bioinspired material is here to overtake petroleum-based plastics, thanks to researchers' work on an easy and scalable manufacture method. (2020-11-08)

Bioplastics no safer than other plastics
Bioplastics contain substances that are as toxic as those in ordinary plastics. (2020-10-23)

A flexible color-changing film inspired by chameleon skin (video)
Chameleons can famously change their colors to camouflage themselves, communicate and regulate their temperature. Scientists have tried to replicate these color-changing properties for stealth technologies, anti-counterfeiting measures and electronic displays, but the materials have limitations. Now, researchers have developed a flexible film that changes color in response to stretching, pressure or humidity. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-10-21)

Glitter litter could be damaging rivers - study
New research indicates that glitter could be causing ecological damage to our rivers and lakes. (2020-10-14)

Oldest monkey fossils outside of Africa found
Three fossils found in a lignite mine in southeastern Yunan Province, China, are about 6.4 million years old, indicate monkeys existed in Asia at the same time as apes, and are probably the ancestors of some of the modern monkeys in the area, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-10-09)

Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Researchers have uncovered details of how a certain type of bacteria breaks down cellulose--a finding that could help reduce the cost and environmental impact of the use of biomass, including biofuel production. The bacteria's cellulose degradation system is in some way different from how a fungus is already widely used in industry, including to soften up denim to make stone-washed jeans. (2020-10-08)

Siberian scientists identified the most promising Russian forest products
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University evaluated the competitiveness of Russian forest industry products by analyzing international trade data from different regions of the country and comparing it to the data from other markets. The study was published in the Forest Policy and Economics journal and supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project no. 19-18-00145). (2020-10-08)

Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs. The method involves spraying methylcellulose, a renewable plastic material derived from plant cellulose, on 3D-printed and other objects ranging from electronics to plants, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Horizons. (2020-10-07)

Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges. Cellulose and woody lignocellulose are especially hard for bacteria to digest but pretreatment can make it easier. Researchers are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method: A plasma-liquid interaction forms reactive species that help break down the biomass and decrease the viscosity of the biomass material. (2020-09-22)

Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress. This discovery helps explain how plant structures can range from floppy grasses to hard wood trees and is important for understanding dietary fibre properties in nutrition. The findings also have applications in medicine, agriculture and a range of other industries. (2020-09-17)

New process boosts lignin bio-oil as a next-generation fuel
A new low-temperature multi-phase process for upgrading lignin bio-oil to hydrocarbons could help expand use of the lignin, which is now largely a waste product left over from the productions of cellulose and bioethanol from trees and other woody plants. (2020-09-08)

The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever. But most people don't think about microscopic remnants of their comfy jeans and other clothing that are shed during laundering. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have detected indigo denim microfibers not only in wastewater effluent, but also in lakes and remote Arctic marine sediments. (2020-09-02)

Scientists shed new light on pollen tube growth in plants
New insight on how an enzyme ensures the correct growth of pollen tubes in flowering plants has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-09-01)

Structural colors from cellulose-based polymers
A surface displays structural colors when light is reflected by tiny, regular structural elements in a transparent material. Researchers have now developed a method to make structural colors from cellulose-based polymers by using coated droplets that exist in a surrounding fluid--so-called liquid marbles. The system readily responds to environmental changes, which makes it interesting for applications in bio-based sensors and soft photonic elements, according to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-08-28)

How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-28)

Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products. Scientists from EPFL, the University of Cambridge, and the Bern University of Applied Sciences have developed a platform that combines different microorganisms that can make a dramatic difference. (2020-08-27)

From biopaste to bioplastic
Forest scientists develop innovative wood-based materials for 3D printing. (2020-08-21)

Sustainable biosynthetic transparent films for plastic substitute
A team lead by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report an ultra-strong, ultra-tough and transparent nacre-inspired nanocomposite film, which is constructed from sustainable ingredients by living bacteria. (2020-08-14)

Nanocrystals from recycled wood waste make carbon-fiber composites tougher
In a new study, Texas A&M University researchers have used a natural plant product, called cellulose nanocrystals, to pin and coat carbon nanotubes uniformly onto the carbon-fiber composites. The researchers said their prescribed method is quicker than conventional methods and also allows the designing of carbon-fiber composites from the nanoscale. (2020-08-11)

From nanocellulose to gold
When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change colour under pressure, or convert light to heat. The research is published in Advanced Functional Materials. (2020-08-10)

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks
Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast. (2020-07-22)

Love-hate relationship of solvent and water leads to better biomass breakup
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron scattering and supercomputing to better understand how an organic solvent and water work together to break down plant biomass, creating a pathway to significantly improve the production of renewable biofuels and bioproducts. (2020-07-15)

Transparent inorganic multicolour displays enabled by zinc-based electrochromic devices
Electrochromic displays have been the subject of extensive research as a promising colour display technology. Herein, a transparent inorganic multicolour display platform based on Zn-based electrochromic devices was demonstrated. These devices enable independent operation of top and bottom electrochromic electrodes, thus providing additional configuration flexibility of the devices through the utilization of dual electrochromic layers under the same or different colour states. (2020-07-14)

Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called 'microfibrils.' (2020-07-09)

Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
According to the United Nations, about one-fifth of the world's population lives in areas where water is scarce. Therefore, technologies to produce clean water from undrinkable sources, such as seawater, river or lake water, and contaminated water, are urgently needed. Now, researchers reporting in Nano Letters have developed a wood-based steam generator that, with the help of bacterial-produced nanomaterials, harnesses solar energy to purify water. (2020-07-08)

Biosynthetic sustainable hierarchical solar steam generator
Nowadays, a team led by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report an efficient and sustainable biomimetic hierarchical solar steam generator (HSSG) based on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanocomposites. (2020-07-08)

The lightest shielding material in the world
Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range - and they are unrivalled in terms of weight. (2020-07-02)

Cellulose for manufacturing advanced materials
The last decade has seen an increase in scientific publications and patents on cellulose, the most abundant natural polymer. By reviewing these papers, a researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Graphic Design and Engineering Projects has explored the level of development of nanohybrid materials made from cellulose nanocrystals combined with organic and inorganic particles. The review focusses on manufacturing methods, types of nanohybrids created, and their applications. (2020-06-26)

From the lab, the first cartilage-mimicking gel that's strong enough for knees
The thin, slippery layer of cartilage between the bones in the knee is magical stuff: strong enough to withstand a person's weight, but soft and supple enough to cushion the joint against impact, over decades of repeat use. That combination of soft-yet-strong has been hard to reproduce in the lab. But now, Duke University researchers say they've created an experimental gel that's the first to match the strength and durability of the real thing. (2020-06-26)

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