Current Cement News and Events

Current Cement News and Events, Cement News Articles.
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Do as the Romans: Power plant concrete strengthens with time
Nagoya University scientists find a rare mineral in nuclear power plant walls, significantly improving their strength following years of full operation. (2021-01-13)

Flashing plastic ash completes recycling
Rice University's flash graphene process, adapted to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash, could be used to strengthen concrete and toughen plastics used in medicine, energy and packaging applications. (2021-01-13)

Nanoengineered cement shows promise for sealing leaky gas wells
Leaking natural gas wells are considered a potential source of methane emissions, and a new nanomaterial cement mixture could provide an effective, affordable solution for sealing these wells, according to a team of Penn State scientists. (2020-12-14)

Risk of serious complications during knee replacement 73% higher when a tourniquet is used
The risk of developing serious complications following a knee replacement could be up to 73% higher when a tourniquet is used, compared to surgery without a tourniquet. Serious complications during knee replacement surgery are rare. However, researchers at the University of Warwick found that 5.9% of patients whose operations involved a tourniquet had serious complications needing additional health care, compared to 2.9% in those operated on without a tourniquet. (2020-12-08)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Reversible stickiness is something to smile about
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed a cross-linker for curing dental cement that can be degraded with UV light. The polyrotaxane cross-linker contains an o-nitrobenzyl ester group that is unstable under UV irradiation. The adhesion strength of a polymer block fixed to bovine dentin with cement stabilized using the cross-linker was significantly reduced after only 2 minutes of irradiation, showing that the linker has potential to ease the removal of temporary dental interventions. (2020-12-04)

Using materials efficiently can substantially cut greenhouse gas emissions
Emissions from the production of materials like metals, minerals, woods and plastics more than doubled in 1995 - 2015, accounting for almost one-quarter of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Material efficiency needs to play a larger role in climate planning, a new report says. (2020-11-18)

The cement for coral reefs
Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity. As they can withstand heavy storms, they offer many species a safe home. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Bayreuth have now discovered that a very specific type of 'cement' is responsible for the stability of coral reefs - by forming a hard calcareous skeleton, coralline red algae stabilise the reefs, and have been doing so for at least 150 million years. (2020-11-03)

Building cities with wood would store half of cement industry's current carbon emissions
A new study has found that shifting to wood as a building construction material would significantly reduce the environmental impact of building construction. If 80% of new residential buildings in Europe were made of wood, and wood was used in the structures, cladding, surfaces, and furnishings of houses, the buildings would store 55 million tons of carbon dioxide a year. That is equivalent to about 47% of the annual emissions of Europe's cement industry. (2020-11-02)

Concrete structure's lifespan extended by a carbon textile
The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT) has announced the development of an effective structural strengthening method using a noncombustible carbon textile grid and cement mortar, which can double the load-bearing capacities of structurally deficient concrete structures and increase their usable lifespan by threefold. (2020-10-26)

Cement, salt and water: From Politecnico di Torino a new material toward green heat
A study carried out from the Turin university in collaboration with the Advanced Energy Technology Institute CNR-ITAE and published on the journal Scientific Reports, suggest a low cost technology to store heat during the summer and use it during the winter, thus saving in fossil fuels. (2020-10-08)

Cement-free concrete beats corrosion and gives fatbergs the flush
Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion. (2020-09-28)

Freshwater biology: Turtle scavenging critical to freshwater ecosystem health
Freshwater turtles may have a role in regulating water quality in river systems by scavenging fish carcasses, suggests a study of Emydura macquarii, a vulnerable freshwater turtle species found in Australia. The findings are published in Scientific Reports. (2020-09-17)

New catalyst efficiently turns carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals
By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst developed by a team of Brown researchers could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide. (2020-08-13)

New way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene
A new way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene has emerged from a team at the University of Sussex. (2020-08-12)

To bond with nature, kids need solitary activities outdoors
A new study found solitary activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside are key to building strong bonds between children and nature. (2020-08-05)

Self-healing bone cement
Material scientists at the University of Jena have developed a bone replacement based on calcium phosphate cement and reinforced with carbon fibers. The fibers increase damage tolerance and ensure that cracks in the material repair themselves. (2020-06-10)

Recycling plastics together, simple and fast
Scientists successfully blended different types of plastics to be recycled together, providing a solution to the environmental problem of plastic waste and adding economic value to plastic materials. (2020-06-02)

'Nature's antifreeze' provides formula for more durable concrete
Secrets to cementing the sustainability of our future infrastructure may come from nature, such as proteins that keep plants and animals from freezing in extremely cold conditions. CU Boulder researchers have discovered that a synthetic molecule based on natural antifreeze proteins minimizes freeze-thaw damage and increases the strength and durability of concrete, improving the longevity of new infrastructure and decreasing carbon emissions over its lifetime. (2020-05-27)

Bricks made from plastic, organic waste
Revolutionary 'green' types of bricks and construction materials could be made from recycled PVC, waste plant fibres or sand with the help of a remarkable new kind of rubber polymer discovered by Australian scientists. The rubber polymer, itself made from sulfur and canola oil, can be compressed and heated with fillers to create construction materials of the future, say researchers in the Young Chemist issue of Chemistry - A European Journal. (2020-05-26)

Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport. (2020-05-18)

Fly ash geopolymer concrete: Significantly enhanced resistance to extreme alkali attack
Fly ash generated by coal-fired power stations is a global environmental headache, creating groundwater and air pollution from vast landfills and ash dams. The waste product can be repurposed into geopolymer concrete, such as precast heat-cured structural elements for buildings. However, a critical durability problem has been low resistance to extreme alkali attack. UJ researchers found that high temperature heat-treatment at 200 degrees Celsius can halve this harmful mechanism in fly ash geopolymer concretes. (2020-05-06)

Long-term developments of energy pricing and consumption in industry
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have collaborated with British economists to study how energy consumption by Swiss industry develops depending on energy pricing. To this end, they examined in particular the prices and consumption of both electricity and natural gas over the past decades. One result: For the most part, price increases have only long-term effects on energy consumption. (2020-05-05)

Mentoring programs help female economists secure tenure-track positions
Research from Princeton University shows that an annual AEA workshop for female economists was effective in retaining women in academia and helping them to achieve tenure in the top 30 to 50 ranked schools in the country. (2020-04-16)

Chinese scientists optimize strontium content to improve bioactive bone cement
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a new strontium-substituted bioactive glass (BG) bone cement that optimizes the concentration of strontium to improve peri-implant bone formation and bone-implant contact. (2020-04-14)

Major new study charts course to net zero industrial emissions
A major new study by an interdisciplinary team of researchers finds that it is possible -- and critical -- to bring industrial greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2070. Published Sunday in Applied Energy, the study assesses the range of technologies and policies interventions available to enable global industry decarbonization. This paper was the result of a collaboration among almost two dozen leading technical experts, led by Jeffrey Rissman of Energy Innovation and coauthored by Resources for the Future (RFF) Senior Fellow Dallas Burtraw. (2020-04-01)

Concrete solutions that lower both emissions and air pollution
Some common strategies to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of concrete production could have unintended consequences for local air pollution and related health damages, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. (2020-03-23)

'Blind over-reliance' on AI technology to manage international migration could lead to serious breaches of human rights
Over-reliance by countries on artificial intelligence to tackle international migration and manage future migration crisis could lead to serious breaches of human rights, a new study warns. (2020-03-17)

How do you make adhesives for electronics, vehicles, and construction tougher?
A Purdue University team, looking to make adhesives tougher, added bonds that are broken easily throughout the material. When pressure or stress is applied to the glue, these sacrificial bonds are designed to absorb energy and break apart. Meanwhile, the rest of the larger adhesive system remains intact. (2020-03-03)

Scientists came up with nanoconcrete for casting under negative temperature conditions
Engineers from Far Eastern Federal University Military training center (FEFU, Vladivostok, Russia) together with colleagues from RUDN University have developed concrete mixture with nano additives for monolithic construction up to ten stories high. The concrete casting is possible within a very humid climate and negative temperature down to minus 5-degree centigrade. Given that, the constructed buildings will not require major renewal for 50 years. The related article is published in Construction and Building Materials. (2020-02-28)

Tax rule for industry rewards carbon capture
When it comes to encouraging manufacturers to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a carrot might be more effective than a stick. That's the approach taken by a recent US tax code rule that offers credits to companies that capture and then store or use CO2. The rule will likely spur innovations in carbon capture technology, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.  (2020-02-26)

An 'exceptionally stable' single-atom catalyst
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have shown that single platinum atoms trapped in C12A7 crystals act as a stable and effective catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes, an essential process in the production of many kinds of fine chemicals. Their approach could become a versatile route for developing other single-atom catalysts for wide-ranging industrial applications. (2020-02-24)

'Wood' you like to recycle concrete?
Scientists at The University of Tokyo studied a method for recycling unused concrete with wood fibers. They found the conditions that produce new building materials with bending strength even greater than the original concrete. This work may help reduce the CO2 emissions associated with manufacturing new concrete. (2020-02-20)

Tiny 'bridges' help particles stick together
Understanding how particles bind together has implications for everything from the likelihood a riverbank will erode to the mechanism by which a drug works in the body. A team from the University of Pennsylvania found that particle size matters more than other properties in determining how strongly they stick together. (2020-02-04)

Buildings can become a global CO2 sink if made out of wood instead of cement and steel
A material revolution replacing cement and steel in urban construction by wood can have double benefits for climate stabilization. First, it can avoid greenhouse gas emissions from cement and steel production. Second, it can turn buildings into a carbon sink as they store the CO2 taken up from the air by trees that are harvested and used as engineered timber. (2020-01-27)

Montana State researcher harnesses microorganisms to make living building materials
Chelsea Heveran, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, is the lead author of a new study showing that certain bacteria can be used to create an easily recyclable, concrete-like substance. (2020-01-22)

Modified plants to curb climate change
New technologies are needed to combat climate change. Now bioinformatics specialists from Würzburg might have found a way of enabling plants to store more carbon dioxide. (2020-01-21)

New optical technique captures real-time dynamics of cement setting
Researchers have developed a nondestructive and noninvasive optical technique that can determine the setting times for various types of cement paste, which is used to bind new and old concrete surfaces. The new method could aid in the development of optimized types of cement with less impact on the environment. (2020-01-16)

Bacteria and sand engineered into living concrete
Cement and concrete haven't changed much as technology in over a hundred years, but researchers in Colorado are revolutionizing building materials by literally bringing them to life. The method developed, presented Jan. 15 in the journal Matter, combines sand and bacteria to build a living material that has structural load-bearing and biological function. (2020-01-15)

Building materials come alive with help from bacteria
New living building materials can grow and multiply -- and may help to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from infrastructure in the future. (2020-01-15)

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