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Salmon scales reveal substantial decline in wild salmon population & diversity
The diversity and numbers of wild salmon in Northern B.C. have declined approximately 70 per cent over the past century, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. (2021-02-22)

COVID-19 infection in pregnancy not linked with still birth or baby death
COVID-19 infection in pregnancy is not associated with stillbirth or early neonatal death, according to a new study. (2021-02-22)

42,000-year-old trees allow more accurate analysis of last Earth's magnetic field reversal
The last complete reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, the so-called Laschamps event, took place 42,000 years ago. Radiocarbon analyses of the remains of kauri trees from New Zealand now make it possible for the first time to precisely time and analyse this event and its associated effects, as well as to calibrate geological archives such as sediment and ice cores from this period. Simulations based on this show considerable effects in the Earth's atmosphere. (2021-02-19)

Eating more refined grains increases risk of heart attack & death: SFU researcher
A new study published in The British Medical Journal by researchers including SFU health sciences professor Scott Lear found consuming a high number of refined grains, such as croissants and white bread, is associated with a higher risk of major cardiovascular disease, stroke and death. (2021-02-19)

Stents or bypass surgery more effective for stable patients with high-risk cardiac anatomy
A study by University of Alberta cardiologists at the Canadian VIGOUR Centre shows that a particular group of patients with stable ischemic heart disease have better outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention (also called angioplasty with stent) or coronary artery bypass surgery and medication, versus conservative management with medication alone. (2021-02-18)

More sustainable recycling of plastics
Plastics belong to the most widely used materials, and they are vital components of all modern technologies. So far, it has been possible to recycle these valuable materials only to a limited extent. In order to offer novel solutions, chemists of Professor Stefan Mecking´s group at the University of Konstanz developed a more sustainable method for chemically recycling polyethylene-like plastics. The researchers use ''breaking-points'' on a molecular level to disassemble the plastic back to its molecular components. (2021-02-17)

All the colours of the dingo: not just a yellow dog
Animals assumed to be dingo-dog hybrids based on their coat colour and culled may have been pure dingoes, a study involving UNSW finds. (2021-02-16)

Psychotherapy for panic disorder shows positive long-term effects
Psychotherapy for panic disorder produces good results, and the effects are lasting. That is the result from a large long-term study from Lund University in Sweden. Two years after treatment were 70 per cent of the patients clearly improved and 45 per cent were remitted. (2021-02-16)

Nursing home staff responses to pandemic reveal resilience, shortcomings: Concordia study
Writing in the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, PhD student Daniel Dickson, his supervisor Patrik Marier, professor of political science, and co-author Robert Henry Cox of the University of South Carolina perform a comparative analysis of nursing home workers' experiences. In it, they look at Quebec (including those at government-run CHSLDs), British Columbia, Washington State and Ohio by reviewing 336 articles in six newspapers published between late-February and mid-June 2020. (2021-02-16)

Heartbeat secrets unlocked as cardiac rhythm gene role identified
Researchers have used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to identify the role of a gene involved in cardiac rhythm, which could help explain the fundamentals of what it takes to make a human heartbeat. (2021-02-15)

21 per cent of all citations go to the elite
In the last 15 years, elite researchers have increased their share of citations from 14 to 21 per cent, shows new research from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University. The uneven distribution can have negative consequences for research. (2021-02-09)

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, Concordia paper reveals
Researchers at Concordia University found that emission levels dropped dramatically over the course of the pandemic. They measured downtown air quality monitoring station data from eight Canadian cities and compared their concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide between February and August 2020 to the figures recorded over the same period in 2018 and 2019. They also used satellite imagery and urban transportation fuel consumption figures to investigate emissions traffic congestion data provided by tracking technology embedded in phones and cars worldwide. (2021-02-09)

Happy childhood? That's no guarantee for good mental health
It's well understood that a difficult childhood can increase the likelihood of mental illness, but according to new research from the University of South Australia, a happy and secure childhood does not always protect a child from developing a mental illness later in life. (2021-02-07)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

Cancer leading cause of death among people with diabetes
Cancer is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes in England. (2021-02-04)

Clients of female sex workers should be targeted for HIV prevention and treatment in South Africa
The researchers found that over a ten-year period (2010-19), sex between female sex workers and their paying clients contributed 6.9 per cent of new HIV infections, while sex between clients with their non-paying partners contributed 41.9 per cent (2021-02-04)

Molecule from nature provides fully recyclable polymers
Plastics are among the most successful materials of modern times. However, they also create a huge waste problem. Scientists from the University of Groningen and the East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST) in Shanghai produced different polymers from lipoic acid, a natural molecule. These polymers are easily depolymerized under mild conditions. Some 87 percent of the monomers can be recovered in their pure form and re-used to make new polymers of virgin quality. (2021-02-04)

Genetic screening before prescribing could benefit millions
New research finds that millions of UK patients could benefit from genetic screening (cheek swab) before being prescribed common medications including antidepressants, stomach ulcer treatments and painkillers. More than 95 per cent of the population carry a genetic marker that predicts an atypical response to at least one medicine. The study looked at nine of these genetic markers, affecting 56 medicines where there are known drug-gene interactions. (2021-01-29)

Otago study examines attitudes toward climate change risk
A University of Otago study explored factors which influence Americans' levels of concern over climate change, providing discussion on how those factors could impact mitigation efforts. (2021-01-28)

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time
Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter - and it's tighter than the science world thought. (2021-01-27)

Mangroves threatened by plastic pollution from rivers, new study finds
Mangrove ecosystems are at particular risk of being polluted by plastic carried from rivers to the sea. Fifty-four per cent of mangrove habitat is within 20 km of a river that discharges more than a tonne of plastic waste a year into the ocean, according to a new paper published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. Mangroves in southeast Asia are especially threatened by river-borne plastic pollution, the researchers found. (2021-01-26)

AI used to predict early symptoms of schizophrenia in relatives of patients
University of Alberta researchers have taken a step forward in developing an artificial intelligence tool to predict schizophrenia by analyzing brain scans. In recently published research, the tool was used to analyze functional magnetic resonance images of 57 healthy first-degree relatives (siblings or children) of schizophrenia patients. It accurately identified the 14 individuals who scored highest on a self-reported schizotypal personality trait scale. (2021-01-26)

Sport may fast-track numeracy skills for Indigenous children
Greater sports participation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is linked with better academic performance, according to new research from the University of South Australia. (2021-01-25)

Global demand for cancer surgery set to surge
A new modelling study led by UNSW predicts demand for cancer surgery will rise by 52 per cent within two decades, with low-income countries bearing the greatest burden. (2021-01-24)

Patients of Asian and black backgrounds more likely to die from COVID, large study reveals
Patients of Asian and black backgrounds suffered disproportionate rates of premature death from COVID-19, according to a study of 1,737 patients by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust. (2021-01-22)

Depression in new fathers connected to relationship insecurities
Becoming a parent often brings great joy, but not always. Parenthood also entails challenges, stress and, for some people, it can trigger depression. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that male postnatal depression is more common in men who are insecure in their relationship with their partner. (2021-01-22)

UK public supports usage of tracking technology and immunity passports in global pandemic
New research suggests the majority of people in the UK are willing to use privacy-encroaching tracking technology and support the introduction of 'immunity passports' to protect themselves and others in the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-22)

Abandoned cropland should produce biofuels
More biofuels are needed to counteract climate change. But producing them shouldn't diminish food production or wilderness areas. The solution may be to grow more grass on recently abandoned cropland. (2021-01-21)

Target of new cancer treatment valid for breast as well as blood cancers: study
Newly published research shows that a new anti-cancer drug developed at the University of Alberta, set to begin human trials this year, may work against breast cancer as well as blood cancer. (2021-01-20)

Indigenous lands: A haven for wildlife
Indigenous peoples' lands may harbour a significant proportion of threatened and endangered species globally, according to University of Queensland-led research. (2021-01-20)

Mental health conditions alarmingly high among children with autism
Nearly 78 per cent of children with autism have at least one mental health condition and nearly half have more than that. Mental health conditions were present in 44.8 per cent of pre-school age children with autism--a group among which prevalence had not previously been established using a large, population-based sample. Only 14.1 per cent of children without autism (ages 3-17) had mental health conditions. (2021-01-19)

Cosmic beasts and where to find them
Two giant radio galaxies have been discovered with South Africa's powerful MeerKAT telescope. These galaxies are thought to be amongst the largest single objects in the Universe. The discovery has been published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (2021-01-18)

Scientists shed light on how and why some people report "hearing the dead"
Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, according to new research. (2021-01-17)

Are partially protected areas the 'red herrings' of marine conservation?
Partially protected marine areas create confusion and don't meet their broad conservation objectives, UNSW researchers have found. (2021-01-15)

USask study finds COVID isolation worsens student diets, inactivity, and alcohol intake
A University of Saskatchewan study has found that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant worsening of already poor dietary habits, low activity levels, sedentary behaviour, and high alcohol consumption among university students. (2021-01-15)

New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy 
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION device). (2021-01-12)

New study shows mental health of ICU staff should be immediate priority
New research from King's College London shows nearly half of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff are likely to meet the threshold for PTSD, severe anxiety or problem drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-12)

Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions. (2021-01-12)

Research finds increased trust in government and science amid pandemic
New Curtin University research has found a dramatic increase in people's trust in government in Australia and New Zealand as a result of the COVID pandemic. (2021-01-08)

COVID-19 accelerates cancer virtual care with quality, convenience and cost savings
Patients and healthcare providers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre rated virtual care during COVID-19 as highly satisfactory overall for quality of care and convenience, while at the same time saving patients millions in costs. (2021-01-07)

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