Current Central Pacific News and Events

Current Central Pacific News and Events, Central Pacific News Articles.
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Future ocean warming boosts tropical rainfall extremes
Climate models predict that the difference between El Niño and La Niña related tropical rainfall will increase over the next 80 years, even though the temperature difference between El Niño and La Niña may change only very little in response to global warming. A new study uncovers the reasons for this surprising fact. (2021-02-22)

Advancing understanding of hop genome to aid brewers, medical researchers
Oregon State University and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers have significantly expanded the understanding of the hop genome, a development with important implications for the brewing industry and scientists who study the potential medical benefits of hops. (2021-02-21)

Researchers demonstrate new method to track genetic diversity of salmon, trout
Scientists at Oregon State University and the U.S. Forest Service have demonstrated that DNA extracted from water samples from rivers across Oregon and Northern California can be used to estimate genetic diversity of Pacific salmon and trout. (2021-02-21)

Northern Hemisphere cold surges result of Arctic and tropical Pacific synergistic effects
A case study on China's 2020-21 winter could help predict future extreme winter weather. (2021-02-19)

Migratory birds track climate across the year
As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range. (2021-02-18)

Understanding cellular clock synchronization
In humans, the disruption of circadian clocks is the cause of many metabolic diseases. Thanks to an observation tool based on bioluminescence, a research (UNIGE) were able to demonstrate that cells that compose a particular organ can be in-phase, even in the absence of the central brain clock. Indeed, the scientists managed to restore circadian function in the liver in completely arrhythmic mice, demonstrating that neurons are not unique in their ability to coordinate. (2021-02-17)

Crocodile evolution rebooted by Ice Age glaciations
Crocodiles are resilient animals from a lineage that has survived for over 200 million years. Skilled swimmers, crocodiles can travel long distances and live in freshwater to marine environments. But they can't roam far overland. American crocodiles (Crocodylus acutus) are found in the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of the Neotropics but they arrived in the Pacific before Panama existed, according to researchers from McGill University. (2021-02-16)

Challenge of the summer rainfall forecast skill in China: A possible solution
The Mongolian Cyclone is a major meteorological driving force across southeast Asia. This cyclone is known for transporting aerosols, affecting where precipitation develops. Meteorologists are seeking ways to improve seasonal prediction of the relationship between the Mongolian cyclone and South Asia high. These features are major components of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the corresponding heavy rain events. New research suggests that analyzing these phenomena in the upper-level atmosphere will enhance the summer rainfall forecast skill in China. (2021-02-16)

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator
Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from. (2021-02-10)

Genes for face shape identified
Genes that determine the shape of a person's facial profile have been discovered by a UCL-led research team. (2021-02-05)

More than meets the eye (of the storm): Typhoons in Korea amplified wildfires in America
In August 2020, the Korean peninsula was hit by 3 devastating typhoons. A recent study by a team of scientists from Korea and the U.S. reveals that these typhoons played a role in the wildfires in Oregon, thousands of miles away. The extreme changes in weather patterns caused by these typhoons reiterate that the consequences of natural disasters are far-reaching and not always limited to the origin. (2021-02-01)

Not too big, not too small: Goldilocks analogy found in maze navigation
Research from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has taken a close look at how fluids navigate around mazes and obstacles and has found a surprising randomness in how they choose their path. (2021-02-01)

Marine heatwaves becoming more intense, more frequent
When thick, the surface layer of the ocean acts as a buffer to extreme marine heating--but a new study from the University of Colorado Boulder shows this ''mixed layer'' is becoming shallower each year. The thinner it becomes, the easier it is to warm. The new work could explain recent extreme marine heatwaves, and point at a future of more frequent and destructive ocean warming events as global temperatures continue to climb. (2021-01-28)

New benchmark set to deliver optimal osteoporosis care throughout Asia Pacific
The Asia Pacific Consortium on Osteoporosis (APCO) has today launched the first pan-Asia Pacific clinical practice standards for the screening, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis, targeting a broad range of high-risk groups. Published in Osteoporosis International, 'The APCO Framework' comprises 16 minimum clinical standards set to serve as a benchmark for the provision of optimal osteoporosis care in the region. (2021-01-27)

Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska
PhD candidate Ellie Broadman of Northern Arizona University's School of Earth and Sustainability developed and led a study in Arctic Alaska to investigate sea ice dynamics and their impact on circulation and precipitation patterns in Arctic Alaska on a long-term basis. She is the lead author on a paper detailing her team's findings, ''Coupled impacts of sea ice variability and North Pacific atmospheric circulation on Holocene hydroclimate in Arctic Alaska,'' recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-25)

Nuclear war could trigger big El Niño and decrease seafood
A nuclear war could trigger an unprecedented El Niño-like warming episode in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, slashing algal populations by 40 percent and likely lowering the fish catch, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment, shows that turning to the oceans for food if land-based farming fails after a nuclear war is unlikely to be a successful strategy - at least in the equatorial Pacific. (2021-01-25)

A large number of gray whales are starving and dying in the eastern North Pacific
It is now the third year that gray whales have been found in very poor condition or dead in large numbers along the west coast of Mexico, USA and Canada, and scientist have raised their concerns. An international study published this week in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series, led by Aarhus University researcher Dr Fredrik Christiansen, suggests that starvation is contributing to these mortalities. (2021-01-22)

Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have studied in more detail. Their results, now published in the international journal Nature Communications, contribute to a better understanding of this climate fluctuation and pose a challenge for prediction models. (2021-01-15)

Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies researchers, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st century, needing the prompt implementation of adaptation measures for anthropogenic global warming. (2021-01-14)

Eastern and central China become brighter due to clean air action
A new study finds that the air pollution control actions can lead to not only considerable environmental and health improvements, but also increases in solar photovoltaic energy production. (2021-01-13)

A safer, less expensive and fast charging aqueous battery
Researchers have developed a new battery anode that overcomes the limitations of lithium-ion batteries and offers a stable, high-performance battery using seawater as the electrolyte. (2021-01-11)

Hawai'i drought during El Niño winter? Not always, according to new research
El Niño events have long been perceived as a driver for low rainfall in the winter and spring in Hawai'i, creating a six-month wet-season drought. However, a recent study by researchers in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the connection between Hawai'i winter rainfall and El Niño is not as straightforward as previously thought. (2021-01-06)

Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change. (2021-01-05)

St Petersburg University scientists discover an ancient island arc in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan
Researchers at St Petersburg University, as part of an international team, have discovered in the Tien Shan mountains a specific complex of rocks that formed in the Cambrian ocean about 500 million years ago. The age of the rock assemblage was established thanks to adakites - a group of acid volcanic rocks, described from one of the islands in the Aleutian arc. (2020-12-31)

Ancient DNA sheds light on the peopling of the Mariana Islands
Compared to the first peopling of Polynesia, the settlement of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific, which happened around 3,500 years ago, has received little attention. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, the Australian National University and the University of Guam have now obtained answers to long debated questions regarding the origin of the first colonizers of the Marianas and their relationship to the people who initially settled in Polynesia. (2020-12-22)

Crikey! Massive prehistoric croc emerges from South East Queensland
A prehistoric croc measuring more than five meters long -- dubbed the 'swamp king' -- ruled south eastern Queensland waterways only a few million years ago. University of Queensland researchers identified the new species of prehistoric croc -- which they named Paludirex vincenti -- from fossils first unearthed in the 1980s. (2020-12-21)

The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
''If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics.'' This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth reveals that this claim holds true globally. (2020-12-17)

Delayed Arctic ice advance tracked back to atmospheric conditions near Alaska months prior
Experts in Japan recently discovered that atmospheric conditions near Alaska can affect sea ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean months later. The team used various data, including ship-based data from 2018, to uncover how a single atmospheric event over the northern Pacific Ocean caused significantly delayed sea ice formation in the Pacific Arctic region. (2020-12-15)

Climate change caused the demise of Central Asia's river civilizations, not Genghis Khan
While Genghis Khan and Mongol invasion is often blamed for the fall of Central Asia's medieval river civilisations, new research shows it may have been down to climate change. Researchers from the University of Lincoln conducted analysis on the region and found that falling water levels may have led to the fall of civilisations around the Aral Sea Basin, as they depended on the water for irrigation-based farming. (2020-12-15)

From publication bias to lost in information
From publication bias to lost in information In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, IQWiG researchers call for a central, public and worldwide portal for clinical trials (2020-12-11)

How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
If a tsunami formed along the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of Oregon, residents might have just 20-30 minutes to get to safety. Scientists have proposed a new forecasting system that could provide seaside towns with critical early warnings. (2020-12-10)

COVID-19 may also invade the central nervous system, cause neurological illnesses
COVID-19 is known primarily as a respiratory disease, with symptoms that include cough, shortness of breath, and, in severe cases, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Now, Cleveland Clinic researchers note in a recent review that infection with the coronavirus may also affect the central nervous system and cause corresponding neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke, encephalitis, encephalopathy and epileptic seizures. According to the review published in Cells, the symptoms of COVID-19-related neurological manifestations include dizziness, headache, a loss of consciousness and ataxia. (2020-12-10)

New study suggests indigenous practices can help revitalize pacific salmon fisheries
Across the North Pacific, salmon fisheries are struggling with climate variability, declining fish populations, and a lack of sustainable fishing opportunities. According to a study published today in BioScience from a team of Indigenous leaders and conservation scientists, help lies in revitalizing Indigenous fishing practices and learning from Indigenous systems of salmon management. (2020-12-09)

Warm oceans helped first human migration from Asia to North America
New research reveals significant changes to the circulation of the North Pacific and its impact on the initial migration of humans from Asia to North America. It provides a new picture of the circulation and climate of the North Pacific at the end of the last ice age, with implications for early human migration. (2020-12-09)

Newly discovered fossils prove 'Shangri-La'-like ecosystem in central Tibet
During the Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition in Tibet, an international research team from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) and the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology discovered a highly diverse fossil assemblage from the current elevation of ?4,850 m in the Bangor Basin in central Tibet. (2020-12-07)

Understanding bacteria's metabolism could improve biofuel production
A new study reveals how bacteria control the chemicals produced from consuming 'food.' The insight could lead to organisms that are more efficient at converting plants into biofuels. (2020-12-03)

Chemical derived from car tires turns streams toxic, kills coho salmon
For Pacific Northwest coho salmon, returning to spawn in the streams and creeks near urban areas can be a death sentence, thanks to a ubiquitous additive in vehicle tires, a new study reveals. (2020-12-03)

Amphibian die-offs worsened malaria outbreaks in Central America
The global collapse of frogs and other amphibians due to the amphibian chytrid fungus exacerbated malaria outbreaks in Costa Rica and Panama during the 1990s and 2000s, according to new research. The findings provide the first evidence that amphibian population declines have directly affected human health and show how preserving biodiversity can benefit humans as well as local ecosystems. (2020-12-02)

Seismic activity of New Zealand's alpine fault more complex than suspected
New evidence of a 19th century earthquake on New Zealand's Alpine fault suggests that in at least one portion of the fault, smaller earthquakes may occur in between such large rupture events. (2020-12-01)

Fiji's vaccine program reduces childhood death and illness: study
Fiji's national vaccine program against pneumonia, a serious lung condition, and rotavirus, a common disease which causes severe diarrhoea and vomiting, has reduced illness and death, new research shows. (2020-11-25)

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