Current Cerebellum News and Events

Current Cerebellum News and Events, Cerebellum News Articles.
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Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows. The study combines genetic information and brain scans from more than 25,000 people for the first time. (2021-01-28)

MRI helps unravel the mysteries of sleep
Scientists at EPFL and the Universities of Geneva, Cape Town and Bochum have joined forces to investigate brain activity during sleep with the help of MRI scans. It turns out our brains are much more active than we thought. (2021-01-22)

Are autism drugs on the horizon?
Are Autism Drugs on the Horizon? Hebrew University Identifies Genetic Mutation Associated with Autism, Offering Hope for Effective Therapeutics (2021-01-11)

Drinking blocks a chemical that promotes attention
UT Health San Antonio scientists studied the cascade of events that begins when alcohol diminishes norepinephrine release in a brain structure called the locus coeruleus. (2020-12-02)

UB study identifies new functions in the Machado-Joseph genetic disease
Ataxia is a minority disease with genetic origins, known for its neuromuscular alterations due to the selective loss of neurons in the cerebellum. University of Barcelona researchers have identified new functions in the ataxin 3 gene (ATXN3) -which causes Machado-Joseph disease, the most common type of ataxia- in the development of retina photoreceptors. These results are relevant also to understand other diseases, such as macular degenerations. (2020-11-25)

Does the human brain resemble the Universe?
An astrophysicist of the University of Bologna and a neurosurgeon of the University of Verona compared the network of neuronal cells in the human brain with the cosmic network of galaxies... and surprising similarities emerged (2020-11-16)

Rethinking the link between cannabinoids and learning
Animals with altered cannabinoid signalling exhibit various motor and cognitive impairments, including deficits in learning and memory. A new study reveals an unexpected culprit for these effects - behavioral state. (2020-10-20)

Decreased protein degradation in cerebellum leads to motor dysfunction
A research team from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed an animal model that reproduces motor dysfunction and cerebellar neurodegeneration similar to that in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) by inhibiting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cerebellar neurons. Since CMA activity is reduced in cells expressing SCA causing proteins, CMA is expected to become a new therapeutic target for SCA--a disease that currently has no basic treatment. (2020-09-23)

Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast. (2020-09-08)

CU Anschutz researchers shed light on split-second decision making
A little understood region of the cerebellum plays a critical role in making split-second 'go-no go' decisions, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-08-31)

Roadmap for linking neurological and locomotor deficits
Scientists capture highly-detailed ''locomotor signatures'' of mouse models of neurological disease. This approach provides a novel way of mapping locomotion disorders onto their underlying neural circuits. (2020-08-24)

Research story tip: Down syndrome mice open door to better understanding of the disorder
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers and their collaborators have created and characterized a new mouse replica of Down syndrome, long considered one of the most challenging disorders to simulate in laboratory animals. (2020-08-18)

KIST finds a strong correlation between ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation treatment and brain waves
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team led, by Dr. Hyungmin Kim at the Center for Bionics, Biomedical Research Institute of the KIST, found a strong correlation between a ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation method for treating damaged brain and a change in delta waves, which is a type of brain waves. (2020-08-12)

Novel approach reduces SCA1 symptoms in animal model
Manipulating a novel mechanism that regulates ATXN1 levels reduced ATXN1 and improved some of the symptoms of neurodegenerative disease SCA1 in animal models. (2020-08-07)

Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation
Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation. (2020-08-03)

'Little brain' or cerebellum not so little after all
When we say someone has a quick mind, it may be in part thanks to our expanded cerebellum that distinguishes human brains from those of macaque monkeys, for example. High-res imaging shows the cerebellum is 80% of the area of the cortex, indicating it has grown as human behavior and cognition evolved. (2020-07-31)

Learning the wiring diagram for autism spectrum disorders
A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified brain circuitry that plays a key role in the dysfunctional social, repetitive, and inflexible behavioral differences that characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The findings, published online this week in Nature Neuroscience, could lead to new therapies for these relatively prevalent disorders. (2020-07-15)

Novel radiotracer measures synaptic activity after stroke
A new radiotracer, 18F-SynVesT-2, can directly assess synaptic density changes in the brain, providing an objective and quantitative measure of disease progression after stroke. Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Annual Meeting shows that the radiotracer may also offer a primary endpoint to evaluate treatment efficacy of novel therapeutics for stroke in clinical trials. (2020-07-13)

Closer threats inspire a more primitive kind of fear
Your brain handles a perceived threat differently depending on how close it is to you. If it's far away, you engage more problem-solving areas of the brain. But up close, your animal instincts jump into action and there isn't as much reasoning. And that is probably what makes it harder to extinguish the fear of a close-up threat and more likely that you'll have some long-term stress from the experience. (2020-06-29)

Scientific breakthrough toward treatment of Fragile X syndrome
Scientists at the University of Calgary have made a discovery that could lead to treatment of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading genetic cause of autism. The study, involving mouse models, shows promise of translating to a treatment for people. Those with FXS are missing a protein vital to brain development called FMRP. The researchers used a fragment of FMRP which was able to cross the blood-brain barrier and restore the protein to normal levels. (2020-06-02)

Researchers develop new method to map cholesterol metabolism in brain
A team of researchers led by Swansea University have developed new technology to monitor cholesterol in brain tissue which could uncover its relation to neurodegenerative disease and pave the way for the development of new treatments. (2020-05-29)

New staining technique visualizes whole organs and bodies
A RIKEN research team in Japan has established an optimized three-dimensional (3D) tissue-staining and observation technique based on existing tissue clearing technology. The study details how the new technique can be used to stain tissue and label cells in mouse brains, human brains, and whole marmoset bodies. This technique will allow detailed anatomical analysis and whole-organ comparisons between species at the cellular level. (2020-04-27)

Special issue of 'Neurochemical Research' honors Vittorio Gallo, Ph.D.
Investigators from around the world penned manuscripts that were assembled in a special issue of 'Neurochemical Research' that honors Vittorio Gallo, Ph.D., for his leadership in the field of neural development and regeneration. (2020-03-19)

Researchers find brain cell that triggers tremor and how to control it
Researchers have improved our understanding of how tremor -- the most common movement disorder -- happens, opening the possibility of novel therapies for this condition. (2020-03-19)

Scientists find sexual dimorphism in cannabinoid 1 receptor expression in mice
A research team led by Dr. WANG Feng from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences demonstrated that CB1R mRNA expression displays a sexually dimorphic pattern in several regions in the adult mouse brain. (2020-03-17)

Scientists shed new light on neural basis of tremors
New insight on what happens in brain cells to cause tremors in mice has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-03-17)

More than a nice coating
Researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) have shown that specialized aggregates of molecules enwrapping nerve cells in the brain, the perineuronal nets, are crucial for regulating the connections between nerve cells that control motor memories. The discovery, published in the PNAS, provide novel insight into how memories are formed and stored in the brain. (2020-03-10)

One step closer to understanding the human brain
An international team of scientists led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has launched a comprehensive overview of all proteins expressed in the brain, published today in the journal Science. The open-access database offers medical researchers an unprecedented resource to deepen their understanding of neurobiology and develop new, more effective therapies and diagnostics targeting psychiatric and neurological diseases. (2020-03-05)

Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans. Scientists now challenge the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique. They found the same asymmetry pattern in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. However, humans were the most variable in this pattern. This suggests that lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities evolved by adapting a presumably ancestral asymmetry pattern. (2020-02-14)

Identified a brain circuit that could indicate the risk of developing Alzheimer's
The first brain changes associated with Alzheimer disease may appear years before the first symptoms. A study has provided evidences that a poor neuronal connection between the brainstem and cerebellum may be predictive of the risk of developing Alzheimer's. (2020-02-12)

High air pollution exposure in 1-year-olds linked to structural brain changes at age 12
A new study suggests that significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with structural changes in the brain at the age of 12. (2020-01-24)

How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain
Researchers were able to track the activity of each neuron in the entire brain of zebrafish larvae and reconstruct the unfolding of neuronal events as the animals repeatedly made 'left or right' choices in a behavioral experiment. The resulting frame-by-frame view of a decision in the making was so detailed that, 10 seconds before the fish responded, the researchers could predict what their next move will be and when they would execute it. (2020-01-16)

Overactive brain waves trigger essential tremor
The source of essential tremor -- involuntary, rhythmic trembling -- has been elusive, but a new study points to abnormal electrical activity in the base of the brain. (2020-01-15)

When pregnant moms are stressed out, babies' brains suffer
Knowing that your unborn fetus has congenital heart disease causes such pronounced maternal stress, anxiety and depression that these women's fetuses end up with impaired development in key brain regions before they are born, according to research published online Jan. 13, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. (2020-01-13)

Missing protein in brain causes behaviors mirroring autism
Scientists at Rutgers University-Newark have discovered that when a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire -- causing an imbalance in its circuitry that can lead to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorder. (2020-01-09)

Plasticizers may contribute to motor control problems in girls
Scientists at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) have uncovered a link between prenatal exposure to phthalates--a ubiquitous group of plasticizers and odor-enhancing chemicals--and deficits in motor function in girls. Phthalates are widely used in consumer products from plastic toys to household building materials to shampoos and are thought to disrupt endocrine function, and possibly interfere with brain development in utero. (2020-01-06)

New study sheds light into origins of neurodegenerative disease
New research has shed light on the origins of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and demonstrates effective new therapeutic pathways for SCA7 and the more than 40 other types of spinocerebellar ataxia. (2019-12-16)

Dendrites filtering neuron's excitement
Kyoto University research shows that Purkinje cell dendrites filter out signals to the Soma. Distal dendrites modulate the incoming signals through intrinsic plasticity associated with the down-regulation of SK channels (2019-12-06)

Multiple correlations between brain complexity and locomotion pattern in vertebrates
Researchers at the Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, have uncovered multi-level relationships between locomotion - the ways animals move - and brain architecture, using high-definition 3D models of lizard and snake brains. (2019-12-05)

A sleeping pill that doesn't make you sway: a new targeted insomnia treatment
University of Tsukuba researchers compared the physical and cognitive side effects of two sleep agents that affect two different kinds of brain receptor. Brotizolam, commonly prescribed for insomnia in Japan, affects GABA receptors, which are present throughout the brain. A newer agent, suvorexant, affects receptors that are specifically involved in wakefulness. Suvorexant was just as effective as brotizolam in terms of sleep duration and efficiency, and had fewer body balance side effects. Future large-scale trials are warranted. (2019-11-22)

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