Current Cerebral Palsy News and Events

Current Cerebral Palsy News and Events, Cerebral Palsy News Articles.
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Beta blockers can repair malformed blood vessels in the brain
Propranolol, a drug that is efficacious against infantile haemangiomas (''strawberry naevi'', resembling birthmarks), can also be used to treat cerebral cavernous malformations, a condition characterised by misshapen blood vessels in the brain and elsewhere. This has been shown by researchers at Uppsala University in a new study published in the scientific journal Stroke. (2021-02-23)

Protein linked to Alzheimer's, strokes cleared from brain blood vessels
Amyloid deposits in the brain increase the risk of dementia and strokes. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified an antibody that clears amyloid deposits from the brain without raising the risk of brain bleeds. (2021-02-17)

Small is big: the need for a holistic approach to manage cerebral small vessel disease
Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a complex brain disease that presents as a wide range of symptoms, starting with mild neurological and physical indications that worsen with age. The vast array of risk factors and varying degrees of success of interventions call for improvement in diagnostic and management strategies. Now, in a new review, researchers from the United Kingdom discuss the clinical aspects of SVD to improve the understanding of disease progression and management. (2021-02-11)

Geisinger-GeneDx research identifies frequent genetic causes of cerebral palsy
Researchers have discovered a strong link between genetic changes known to cause neurodevelopmental disabilities and cerebral palsy, further debunking birth asphyxia as its major cause. (2021-02-02)

New gene variant linked to stroke
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have identified a gene variant that can cause cerebral small vessel disease and stroke. The study is published in Neurology Genetics. (2021-01-28)

Multiple sclerosis: Immune cells silence neurons by removing synapses
Damage to the brain gray matter plays an important role in the progression of multiple sclerosis. This study now shows that such damage can be caused by inflammatory reactions that lead to loss of synapses, which impairs neural activity. (2021-01-26)

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (2021-01-26)

Geisinger research identifies genetic risk factor for stroke
A team of Geisinger researchers has identified a common genetic variant as a risk factor for stroke, especially in patients older than 65. (2021-01-19)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

For moms, oxygen during childbirth often unnecessary
A comprehensive analysis - led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis - has found no benefit in providing supplemental oxygen to mothers during labor and delivery, a decades-long and common practice. Infants born to women who received supplemental oxygen fared no better or no worse than those born to women who had similar labor experiences but breathed room air. (2021-01-04)

Impact of COVID-19 on children with disabilities, caregivers and healthcare providers
Pediatric rehabilitation experts assess the impact of the pandemic on pediatric rehabilitation patients and the increasing use of telemedicine and provide insights and recommendations for mitigating the impact of the virus, in this special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine (2021-01-04)

Higher red cell transfusion threshold offers no advantage for treating preterm infants
Very low birthweight infants often need blood transfusions to survive. A National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests that providing a higher threshold of red cells within accepted limits offers no advantage in survival or reduction in neurological impairment over a lower threshold. (2020-12-30)

Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology. (2020-12-16)

Stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles ease brain bleeding in newborn rats
Murine study, by researchers at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, shows how extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can ease IVH-induced brain injuries. (2020-12-15)

Scientists solve 100-year-old cerebral malaria mystery using neuroimaging techniques
Scientists have shown for the first time that cerebral malaria causes death in adults by triggering oxygen-deprivation in the brain, in new research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. Already available treatments, such as hypothermia, may slow brain oxygen-deprivation in cerebral malaria patients. The researchers say these neuronal survival-enhancing approaches could soon be trialled in adults with cerebral malaria, alongside existing anti-malarial treatments, to hopefully improve survival. (2020-12-15)

Five-minute EEG recordings: a key to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull. Researchers from Leipzig University Hospital and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences recently published these new findings in the journal Brain. (2020-12-09)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

How networks form: Charting the developing brain
Researchers use connectomic mapping in the developing cortex to uncover the developmental wiring rules for inhibitory neurons (2020-12-03)

Study identifies novel mechanisms that cause protein clumping in brain diseases
A team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has taken a major step toward understanding the mechanisms involved in the formation of large clumps of tau protein, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-01)

Immune checkpoint inhibitor efficacy against glioblastoma may decrease with dexamethasone
Among patients with glioblastoma receiving an immune checkpoint inhibitor, those who received the corticosteroid dexamethasone at baseline for cerebral edema had significantly worse overall survival. (2020-11-25)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

Scientists discover new mechanism controlling brain size
International research headed by Danish Scientists has led to the discovery of a new mechanism that controls the size of our brains. The finding, which is based on studies on a rare congenital brain disease, delivers an important piece of data in our knowledge about how the human brain is formed during development. (2020-11-16)

Research shows what happens in the sensory cortex when learning and recognising patterns
A study by scientists at the University of Sussex is challenging the common understanding of how mammalian brains work. (2020-11-12)

Neural stem and progenitor cell diversity in brain development may contribute to cortical complexity
Stem and progenitor cells exhibit diversity in early brain development that likely contributes to later neural complexity in the adult cerebral cortex, this according to a new study published Nov. 6, 2020 in Science Advances. Researchers from the Center for Neuroscience Research (CNR) at Children's National Hospital say this research expands on existing ideas about brain development, and could significantly impact the clinical care of neurodevelopmental diseases in the future. (2020-11-06)

Subarachnoid hemorrhage causes more deaths among middle-aged women than other strokes
According to a recently published Finnish study, subarachnoid hemorrhage, which has so far been considered a relatively rare type of stroke, causes a significant share of all fatalities among middle-aged people. The number of, in particular, middle-aged women whose death is caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage is higher than the corresponding figure for cerebral infarction, a much more common disorder measured by the number of cases for all ages. (2020-11-05)

AI helps detect brain aneurysms on CT angiography
A powerful type of artificial intelligence known as deep learning can help physicians detect potentially life-threatening cerebral aneurysms on CT angiography, according to a new study. (2020-11-03)

Venous origin of brain blood-vessel malformations
In the condition known as cavernoma, lesions arise in a cluster of blood vessels in the brain, spinal cord or retina. Researchers from Uppsala University can now show, at molecular level, that these changes originate in vein cells. This new knowledge of the condition creates potential for developing better therapies for patients. The study has been published in the journal eLife. (2020-11-03)

Study reveals unexpected protective role for brain swelling after injury
Following a brain-injuring bump or blow to the head, brain cells and blood vessels typically swell. This can lead to a potentially life-threatening increase in pressure inside the skull, and managing swelling is critical for patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). But researchers at University of Utah Health have discovered that swelling may also be important for protecting the brain. (2020-11-02)

New assay screens human brain organoids, doubles known candidate genes for microcephaly
A new tissue screening assay for human cerebral organoids identified 25 additional candidate genes for microcephaly, nearly doubling the number of currently known genes linked to the rare neurological condition. (2020-10-29)

Age and pre-existing conditions increase risk of stroke among COVID-19 patients
Fourteen out of every 1,000 COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital experience a stroke, a rate that is even higher in older patients and those with severe infection and pre-existing vascular conditions, according to a report published this week. (2020-10-28)

Comparing canine brains using 3D-endocast modelling
Based on digital endocranial cast models the canine brain does not increase proportionally with body size. Researchers at ELTE Eötvös Loránd and Kaposvár University in Hungary reconstructed the surface morphology of 28 canine brains, including various dog breeds, wolves, coyotes, and jackals. The shortening of the facial skeleton greatly influences the ratio of certain brain regions, primarily the olfactory bulb and the frontal lobe. These changes might have profound implications for olfactory and problem-solving abilities. (2020-10-22)

Robotic trunk support trainer improves upper body control of children with cerebral palsy
Columbia Engineering researchers report their innovative robotic Trunk Support Trainer, when combined with active practice of postural movements, improves trunk and reaching control in CP children with impaired sitting control. TruST helps physical therapists to not only support the children in the region of the trunk where they suffer from weakness and incoordination but also challenge them to perform rehabilitation tasks outside their base of support to improve their movement and coordination. (2020-10-22)

Reduced hormone supply in pregnant mothers linked to ADHD in their children
Low levels of key, body-regulating chemicals in mothers during the first three months of pregnancy may interfere with the baby's brain development, a large American study shows. (2020-10-21)

New research reveals why low oxygen damages the brain
Brain cell dysfunction in low oxygen is, surprisingly, caused by the very same responder system that is intended to be protective, according to a new published study by a team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. (2020-10-21)

Results from the REFLECT II Trial reported at TCT Connect
The REFLECT II randomized clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of a device designed to reduce cerebral embolization and ischemic stroke, complications of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), found that the device met the primary safety endpoint compared to historical controls but did not demonstrate superiority of the device for the primary hierarchical efficacy endpoint. (2020-10-15)

Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy
An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder. (2020-10-07)

Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science discovered that cortical neuronal intracellular concentrations of ATP, the major cellular energy metabolite, greatly decreased during REM sleep, despite a simultaneous increase in cerebral hemodynamics for energy supply, compared with waking in mice. These indicate that cerebral energy metabolism may not always meet neuronal energy demands. (2020-10-07)

Excess folic acid during pregnancy harms brain development of mice
A study of pregnant mice found high levels of folic acid were associated with significant changes in brain development of offspring. (2020-10-05)

Cerebral palsy also has genetic underpinnings
Scientists have identified mutations in single genes that can be responsible for at least some cases of cerebral palsy, according to a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study indicates that many of the mutations occur randomly and are not inherited from a child's parents. The new knowledge could help improve the diagnosis of cerebral palsy and lead to future therapies. (2020-09-30)

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