Current Cervical Cancer News and Events | Page 25

Current Cervical Cancer News and Events, Cervical Cancer News Articles.
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Chemotherapy may boost immunotherapy power in ovarian cancer
Cancer Research UK scientists have found that women with advanced ovarian cancer may benefit more from immunotherapy drug treatments if they are given straight after chemotherapy. (2016-06-15)

USF researchers find stroke damages blood-spinal cord barrier
Researchers investigating the short and long-term effects of ischemic stroke in a rodent model have found that stroke can cause long-term damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, which provides a specialized protective 'microenvironment' for neural cells in the spinal cord, creating a 'toxic environment' in the spinal cord that might leave stroke survivors susceptible to motor dysfunction and disease pathology. (2016-06-13)

Young cancer survivors are more likely to smoke than people without cancer history
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that cancer survivors who were diagnosed at adolescent and young adult ages are more likely to be current cigarette smokers than people who have not had cancer. The findings of this study are currently available in Cancer. (2016-06-10)

Cancer-causing virus strikes genetically vulnerable horses
A new study shows genetic differences in immune function partly account for why some horses get sarcoid tumors while others do not. (2016-06-10)

Lupus confirmed as risk factor for cervical cancer
Lupus confirmed as risk factor for cervical cancer (2016-06-09)

Harold Alfond Foundation charitable gift to help improve cancer care in the state of Maine
A charitable contribution of $8,410,000 from the Harold AlfondĀ® Foundation will support The Jackson Laboratory's efforts to enhance cancer diagnostics and treatment in Maine. (2016-06-08)

Cancer cell immunity in the crosshairs: Worth the expense?
Japanese scientists have found unique genetic alterations that could indicate whether expensive immune checkpoint inhibitors would be effective for a particular patient. Publishing in Nature, the study reports that genetic alterations affecting a part of the PD-L1 gene increases the production of the protein, allowing cancer cells to escape detection by the immune system. (2016-06-03)

Study finds that higher BMI and waist circumference are associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer
A study of almost 150,000 men from eight European countries, presented at this year's European Obesity Summit (Gothenburg, June 1-4) shows that higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference are associated with an increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. (2016-06-02)

University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center earns NCI's highest designation
The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center has been awarded the National Cancer Institute's highest designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. The prestigious distinction recognizes the cancer center's high caliber of scientific leadership and robust programs in basic, clinical and population science research, placing it in the top tier of cancer centers nationwide. The new name of the center is the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC). (2016-05-31)

Research points to possible new prevention strategies for ovarian cancer
The discovery of early changes in the cells of the Fallopian tubes of women carrying the BRCA genetic mutation could open the way for new preventative strategies for ovarian cancer, reducing the need for invasive surgery, according to research published today in science journal Nature Communications. (2016-05-24)

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins
While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, describes a new concept of how these two cancers may evolve in a similar way and may eventually lead to more effective therapies for both. (2016-05-23)

Researchers reveal how a new class of drugs kills cancer cells
A team of Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers has worked out how a new class of anti-cancer drugs kills cancer cells, a finding that helps explain how cancer cells may become resistant to treatment. (2016-05-20)

Appeal of 'genetic puzzles' leads to National Medal of Science for UW's Mary-Claire King
In a White House ceremony May 19, President Barack Obama presented the National Medal of Science to Mary-Claire King, University of Washington professor of genome sciences and medicine. The award, the nation's highest recognition for scientific achievement, honors King's more than 40 years dedicated to research in evolution and the genetics of human disease, as well as to teaching and outreach endeavors that have supported human rights efforts on six continents and reunited families. (2016-05-19)

Fighting cancer with the help of someone else's immune cells
A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might. Their proof of principle study is published in the journal Science on May 19. (2016-05-19)

Biomarker may predict endometrial cancer recurrences
New research from the lab of Martina Bazzaro, Ph.D., of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, suggests the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 as a promising biomarker for identifying risk of recurrence in endometrial cancer patients. (2016-05-18)

HIV-infected patients more likely to lack cancer treatment
A new study finds HIV-infected patients with cancer in the United States appear to be less likely to receive cancer treatment, regardless of insurance and other existing health conditions. (2016-05-17)

Blocking apoptotic response could preserve fertility in women receiving cancer treatments
Female cancer patients of reproductive age could preserve their fertility during radiation and chemotherapy through treatments that target the DNA damage response in oocytes (the cells that develop into eggs), an approach that works in animal models. (2016-05-17)

Findings expand potential of cancer drug
New research from the Canadian Cancer Trials Group has discovered that a new subset of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer could benefit from taking the drug cetuximab. (2016-05-13)

New research gives deeper understanding of why some breast cancers are hard to treat
Scientists have unearthed crucial new genetic information about how breast cancer develops and the genetic changes which can be linked to survival. (2016-05-10)

Research discovers mechanism that causes cancer cells to escape from the immune system
Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center found that when cancer cells are able to block the function of a gene called NLRC5, they are able to evade the immune system and form tumors, according to research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discovery indicates NLRC5 as a novel biomarker for cancer patient survival and therapeutic response, as well as a potential target for new treatments. (2016-05-10)

Nuclear DNA gets cut and activates immune system to attack cancer cells
The enzyme MUS81 cuts DNA in the nucleus of cancer cells, causing the cut DNA to move to the cytoplasm instead of becoming degraded. The out-of-place DNA triggers an immune response against cancer cells. Discovering this new means of enhancing anti-cancer immune responses could lead to more effective cancer therapies using a combination of a MUS81-stimulating drug and an immunotherapy. (2016-05-10)

Medical conditions are more common in women who are sexually abused
Researchers have found that a variety of conditions are more common in women before and after sexual assault. (2016-05-04)

Patient-physician communication is critical for prostate cancer survivors' health
For prostate cancer patients who had their prostates surgically removed, patient-physician communication was key for helping them cope with their disease and for improving their health-related quality of life. (2016-05-04)

Ovary removal may increase the risk of colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer may rise in women who have their ovaries removed, according to new research. (2016-05-04)

Stress and depression is linked to HPV-related health problems
New research to be highlighted at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting is the first to suggest that stress and depression play a significant role in whether a woman with human papillomavirus (HPV) can get rid of her infection or not. HPV that lingers in a woman's system eventually can lead to cervical cancer. (2016-04-30)

Professor Jack Cuzick elected as Fellow of the Royal Society
Professor Jack Cuzick from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has been elected as a new Fellow of the Royal Society. The election is in recognition of his achievements in the application of basic science discoveries to the practice of medicine, particularly preventive medicine in cancer. (2016-04-29)

HPV infection can be identified in self-collected vaginal swabs
High risk, potentially cancer causing human papillomavirus infections are common among women in Papua New Guinea. But self sampling with vaginal swabs may provide materials that screen as accurately as the more labor-intensive approach using cervical samples obtained by clinicians. This finding is critical to developing same day screening and treatment, which is key to ensuring that women with precancerous lesions are treated in this largely unconnected (electronically) country, and in others like it. (2016-04-29)

Study pinpoints mechanism that allows cells with faulty DNA to reproduce
University of Minnesota researchers have figured out how some cells do an end-run on replication quality control -- opening the door to developing new cancer-quashing treatments. (2016-04-28)

Shape of tumor may affect whether cells can metastasize
Only a few cells in a cancerous tumor are able to break away and spread to other parts of the body, but the curve along the edge of the tumor may play a large role in activating these tumor-seeding cells, according to a new University of Illinois study. (2016-04-28)

HPV vaccination expected to reduce cancer in all races, may not eliminate all disparities
Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers occur more frequently among Hispanics, blacks, American-Indians, and Alaska Natives than among whites. A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health finds that HPV vaccination is expected to reduce the cancer burden across all racial/ethnic groups. However, some disparities in cancer burden may persist and widen in the years to come if their causes, such as lack of access to diagnoses and treatment, aren't addressed. (2016-04-28)

Expand HPV vaccination programs in Canada to include males
Expanding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs to include males in Canada will help protect them against HPV-related cancers, according to an analysis published in CMAJ. (2016-04-25)

Researchers find potential new treatment target for deadly brain cancer
A team of researchers has found a key player in brain tumor formation that may lead to new therapies for a deadly and incurable cancer. The study published in Nature Neuroscience is the first to show that a protein called OSMR (Oncostatin M Receptor) is required for glioblastoma tumours to form. Glioblastoma is one of the most deadly cancers, resistant to radiation, chemotherapy and difficult to remove with surgery. (2016-04-25)

Risk of liver cancer from hepatitis B persists even after clearing the virus
Long-term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause liver inflammation and increase the risk of liver cancer. Researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, found that resolving HBV infection was not associated with reduced rates of liver cancer. (2016-04-22)

UChicago, Evelo Biosciences sign licensing deal for microbiome-based cancer immunotherapy
Evelo Biosciences and the University of Chicago have announced that they have entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement to develop and commercialize a microbiome-based cancer immunotherapy. The cancer therapy, developed in the laboratories of Thomas Gajewski, professor of medicine and pathology at UChicago, employs select gut microbes to boost the immune system's attack on cancer cells and improve the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs. (2016-04-21)

New HPV vaccine could curb cervical cancers and health costs if adopted widely
A Yale-led study finds that a new vaccine for human papillomavirus would significantly reduce both cervical cancer incidence and healthcare costs if states coordinated policies to improve coverage. (2016-04-18)

AAN updates guidelines: Botulinum toxin for spasticity, headache, other brain disorders
The American Academy of Neurology has updated its 2008 guidelines on the use of botulinum toxin for spasticity, cervical dystonia, blepharospasm and migraine headache, based on recent research. The guideline is published in the April 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, and will be presented at the 68th AAN Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. (2016-04-18)

Treatment for chronic hepatitis B linked to increased rates of colorectal and cervical cancer
A new study presented today demonstrates a potential link between treatment of long-term oral nucleos(t)ide analogues and an increased risk of colorectal (p=0.029) and cervical (p=0.049) cancer in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV). The study results were presented at The International Liver CongressTM 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. (2016-04-15)

SPECT-MRI fusion minimizes surgery for diagnosis of early-stage cervical cancer patients
A recent study reported in the April issue of 'The Journal of Nuclear Medicine' found that cervical cancer patients without enlarged lymph nodes could benefit from SPECT-MRI imaging of their sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) to assess whether metastases are present. (2016-04-14)

Modified flu virus can 'resensitize' resistant pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy
A common flu virus could be used to overcome patients' resistance to certain cancer drugs -- and improve how those drugs kill cancer cells, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). (2016-04-14)

Potential cholesterol-lowering drug molecule has prostate cancer fighting capabilities
Standard treatment for prostate cancer can include chemotherapy that targets receptors on cancer cells. However, drug-resistant cancer cells can emerge during chemotherapy, limiting its effectiveness as a cancer-fighting agent. Researchers at the University of Missouri have proven that a compound initially developed as a cholesterol-fighting molecule not only halts the progression of prostate cancer, but also can kill cancerous cells. (2016-04-14)

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