Current Cesarean News and Events

Current Cesarean News and Events, Cesarean News Articles.
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Physical therapy after c-section improves outcomes
Women who received physical therapy after undergoing a cesarean section had significantly improved outcomes compared to those who did not according to a new study from University of Missouri Health Care. (2021-02-17)

Enhanced recovery efforts for cesarean delivery reduce need for opioids by 80%
In a retrospective analysis of cesarean deliveries from 2015 through 2020, doctors from the Colorado Fetal Care Center at Children's Hospital Colorado found that using a wound infusion pump in combination with enhanced recovery efforts like removing urinary catheters earlier and walking around the same day of surgery can reduce opioid use by more than 80%. Also notable, researchers found a third of patients never took a single narcotic pain pill after cesarean delivery. (2021-01-28)

New research finds severity of COVID-19 determines likelihood of pregnancy complications
Researchers will unveil findings that suggest that pregnant women who become severely or critically ill due to COVID-19 are at greater risk of dying and experiencing serious pregnancy complications compared to pregnant women who have COVID-19 but were asymptomatic, or without symptoms. In contrast, pregnant women with mild or moderate illness were not at higher risk of pregnancy complications than those without symptoms. (2021-01-28)

Post-surgical patch releases non-opioid painkiller directly to the wound
A Duke-led team of scientists has developed a bio-compatible surgical patch that releases non-opioid painkillers directly to the site of a wound for days and then dissolves away. The polymer patch provides a controlled release of a drug that blocks the enzyme COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2,) which drives pain and inflammation. The study appears Jan. 10, 2021 in the Journal of Controlled Release. (2021-01-11)

More support for induction at 41 weeks' pregnancy, especially for first time mothers
There is growing evidence that pregnant women who go beyond term, especially first time mothers and their infants, will benefit from induction of labour at 41 weeks, instead of expectant management with subsequent induction of labour at 42 weeks if labour will not start spontaneously. This is clearer now that researchers from Sweden and the Netherlands have appraised results from three previous investigations. (2020-12-08)

Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization
Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Jessica Miller at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Australia and colleagues suggests that compared to vaginally-born children, cesarean-born children may have a higher risk of infection-related hospitalization for up to five years of age. (2020-11-19)

Cesarean-born babies at increased risk of infection-related hospitalisation in childhood
Cesarean-born babies are at increased risk during early childhood of being hospitalised due to an infection, according to a new study of over seven million births from four countries. (2020-11-19)

Do cesarean delivery's effects on birth hormones impact a newborn's neurodevelopment?
Cesarean section delivery and vaginal delivery lead to different hormonal exposures that may affect a newborn's development, according to an article published in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology. (2020-11-04)

Hormone differences
During birth, hormones in the body surge in both mother and baby, sent along by the nervous system. These stress hormones are there to spur delivery and to help a baby adapt to living outside the womb. A new study finds how one is born can have an effect on the amount of stress hormones released at the time of delivery. For example, vaginal delivery had the highest presence of birth signaling hormones. (2020-11-04)

Higher risk of future fecal incontinence after sphincter injuries
The risk of subsequent fecal incontinence and intestinal gas leakage is significantly higher among women who, during childbirth, have suffered a sphincter injury and consequent damage to the anal sphincter muscle, was shown in a new study from the University of Gothenburg. (2020-11-02)

COVID-19 control measures shorten hospital stays for moms, babies
A new study from Cedars-Sinai shows new infection prevention practices implemented during the coronavirus pandemic have resulted in significantly shorter hospital stays for mothers and their babies, with no changes in the rates of cesarean deliveries, complications or poor outcomes. (2020-11-02)

RUDN University doctors suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients
A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues had studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition. (2020-10-14)

Feeding C-section newborns their mother's poop may help build healthy microbiota
A paper published October 1, 2020 in the journal Cell suggests that newborns delivered by cesarean may benefit from drinking a small amount of their mother's feces dissolved in breast milk, because it provides them with beneficial bacteria they would otherwise be exposed to in vaginal birth. At three months, the procedure resulted in the newborns having a microbial makeup that looks more similar to babies born vaginally than to those born by C-section. (2020-10-01)

Fecal transplantation can restore the gut microbiota of C-section babies
Birth by Cesarean section is detrimental to normal gut microbiota development. Researchers demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota development can be restored by postnatal, orally-delivered transplantation of maternal fecal microbiota. (2020-10-01)

Study: Women want more info on reproductive care restrictions from religious hospitals
Researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of California, San Francisco found that women value clear information shared early from their health care providers to help them anticipate religious restrictions before their care becomes urgent. (2020-10-01)

Study: Unnecessary stress testing performed prior to knee and hip replacement surgeries
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine shows the overall rate of preoperative stress testing for hip and knee replacements is and has been decreasing consistently since 2006. Still, researchers found, 30,000 out of every 100,000 stress tests performed each year were unnecessary, as the tests didn't decrease the frequency of complications such as heart attacks or stopped hearts. (2020-10-01)

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure. (2020-09-22)

Research Finds Women Often Overprescribed Opioids After Childbirth
Excessive opioid prescriptions following childbirth may lead to higher rates of addiction within communities, according to a new report in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. (2020-08-12)

Medicaid-covered mothers have less say in birthing experience: BU study
Giving birth in the United States is a radically different experience based on race and income, illustrated most brutally by the Black and Indigenous maternal mortality crisis. (2020-07-28)

Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk
A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. (2020-07-10)

Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The team followed more than 2,000 women for three years after they delivered their first child. (2020-07-09)

Non-invasive fetal oxygen monitor could make for safer deliveries
A device to directly measure blood oxygen saturation in a fetus during labor has been developed by researchers at UC Davis. By providing better information about the health of a fetus right before birth, the device could both reduce the rate of Cesarean sections and improve outcomes in difficult deliveries. (2020-06-17)

Opioid prescriptions after childbirth linked to increased risk of overdose, persistent use
Women who are prescribed opioids after childbirth have an increased risk of persistent opioid use or other serious opioid-related events, including overdose, in their first year postpartum, according to a new study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers. This is true regardless of whether the woman had a vaginal delivery or a cesarean section. (2020-06-08)

Largest study of its kind of women in labor finds nitrous oxide safe, side effects rare
Researchers at the University of Colorado College of Nursing and the School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology at the Anschutz Medical Campus found that the use of nitrous oxide (N2O) as a pain relief option for individuals in labor is safe for newborn children and laboring individual, and converting to a different form of pain relief such as an epidural or opioid is influenced by a woman's prior birth history and other factors. (2020-05-29)

AHA statement: Pregnant women with CVD need specialized care before, during and postpartum
Women with cardiovascular disease should receive pre-pregnancy counseling and be monitored during and after pregnancy by either a cardio-obstetrics team or a multidisciplinary team of health care providers with experience in high-risk pregnancies. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death during pregnancy and is slowly increasing, possibly because women are having children at older ages and/or have other preexisting conditions. (2020-05-04)

Is birth by cesarean associated with increased risk of obesity, diabetes in adulthood?
Risks for obesity and type 2 diabetes in adulthood were compared among 33,000 women born by cesarean or vaginal delivery between 1946 and 1964 in this observation study that included participants in the Nurses' Health Study II. (2020-04-13)

Labor after previous cesarean should be considered
Labor after cesarean may be successful in over 90% of cases and thus may be considered a reasonable option for both mother and child, a study published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth suggests. When given detailed information on the risks and benefits associated with the different delivery options, expectant mothers were more likely to choose vaginal birth following a previous cesarean rather than repeat cesarean delivery. (2020-03-23)

Predicting appropriate opioid prescriptions post-cesarean delivery
Knowing the amount of opioids taken following cesarean section surgery and before discharge can inform individualized prescriptions and cut down on unnecessary, leftover pills that could be used for non-medical purposes, according to a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-03-09)

'Birth Settings' report explores medical disparities of childbirth in the US
A report released earlier this month dives deep into the ongoing inequities surrounding childbirth in the US, with Oregon emerging as a leading example of how to do better. (2020-02-17)

General anesthesia in cesarean deliveries increases odds of postpartum depression by 54 percent
A new study shows that having general anesthesia in a cesarean delivery is linked with significantly increased odds of severe postpartum depression requiring hospitalization, thoughts of suicide or self-inflicted injury. The study is the first to examine the effect of the mode of anesthesia for cesarean delivery on the risk of postpartum depression and the possible protective effect of having regional anesthesia for cesarean delivery on maternal mental health compared with general anesthesia. (2020-02-04)

US birth weights drop due to rise in cesarean births, inductions
US birth weights have fallen significantly in recent decades due to soaring rates of cesarean deliveries and inductions which have shortened the average pregnancy by a week, new research shows. (2020-01-30)

Certified nurse-midwives lead collaborative care model as solution to obstetrician shortage
Fewer physicians are pursuing careers in obstetrics, in part because of the intense, round-the-clock demands of the job and a high burnout rate. An unusually large number of practicing obstetricians are expected to retire within the next decade, which will add to an already acute physician shortage. (2020-01-15)

Cesarean delivery rates in China
This study assessed changes between 2008 and 2018 in the rate of cesarean deliveries in China. (2020-01-07)

Having a baby may cost some families $4,500 out-of-pocket
One of the most expensive parts of having a baby may involve the birth itself, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests. (2020-01-06)

Study debunks notion that C-section would increase risk of obesity in the child
Women who have C-sections are no more likely to have children who develop obesity than women who give birth naturally, according to a large study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal PLOS Medicine. The findings contradict several smaller studies that did find an association between C-section deliveries and offspring obesity but did not consider the numerous maternal and prenatal factors that the researchers did in this study. (2019-12-06)

Umbilical cord milking may be linked to higher risk of brain bleeding in preterm infants
Milking the umbilical cord -- gently squeezing the cord and pushing the contents into the newborn's abdomen before clamping the cord -- could increase the risk for severe intraventricular hemorrhage, or bleeding into the brain's fluid-filled cavities, in extremely preterm infants, according to results of a study funded by the National Institutes of Health that was halted for safety concerns. (2019-11-19)

Trial compares maternal blood loss with immediate vs. delayed umbilical cord clamping
This randomized clinical trial compared maternal blood loss with immediate umbilical cord clamping (within 15 seconds after birth) versus delayed clamping (60 seconds after birth) in 113 women who had a scheduled cesarean delivery at term of 37 weeks or more. (2019-11-19)

Rollercoaster weight changes can repeat with second pregnancy, especially among normal-weight women
Everyone knows that gaining excess weight during one pregnancy is bad, but clinicians rarely consider weight gains and losses from one pregnancy to the next -- especially in normal-weight women. But researchers from Marquette University and the University of Michigan found that among normal-weight women, fluctuating weight gain and loss in the first pregnancy is often repeated in subsequent pregnancies -- and is associated with higher risk of several pregnancy-related complications. (2019-11-14)

Imaging test may help predict the success of labor induction
When labor is induced in pregnant women, one in five women will require an emergency cesarean section. A study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica has demonstrated an effective way to predict such cases. (2019-11-06)

Episiotomy may be beneficial in reducing severe perineal tears among forceps and vacuum deliveries
The use of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in Canada, although its benefit in births assisted by forceps or vacuum merits reconsideration of this practice, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-21)

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