Current Challenging Assignment News and Events

Current Challenging Assignment News and Events, Challenging Assignment News Articles.
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New review compiles immunogenicity data on leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates
In a new Review, P.J. Klasse and colleagues present an extensive overview of the immunogenicity profiles of several leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, including several developed under the auspices of (2021-02-19)

Locked MOFs are the key to high porosity
Sophisticated geometry design gives rise to a new form of crystalline material. (2021-02-18)

The smallest galaxies in our universe bring more about dark matter to light
Our universe is dominated by a mysterious matter known as dark matter. Its name comes from the fact that dark matter does not absorb, reflect or emit electromagnetic radiation, making it difficult to detect. (2021-02-16)

Training to wisely navigate social conflicts
People are able to approach social conflicts more wisely if they have trained themselves in advance by practicing a distanced self-talk technique, referring to themselves with third-person pronouns such as ''she'' or ''they'' rather than the first-person pronouns of ''me'' or ''I.'' (2021-02-09)

Hypnotic suggestions can make a complex task easy by helping vision fill in the blanks
New research demonstrates that hypnosis--the process of focusing a person's attention on a specific task or sensation--can turn a normally difficult visual task into a far easier one by helping individuals mentally ''fill in the gaps'' of missing visual cues. (2021-01-27)

Where do our minds wander? Brain waves can point the way
Anyone who has tried and failed to meditate knows that our minds are rarely still. But where do they roam? New research led by the University of California, Berkeley, has come up with a way to track the flow of our internal thought processes and signal whether our minds are focused, fixated or wandering. (2021-01-19)

Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease. (2021-01-07)

Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds. Now researchers have reported a machine learning model that can accurately predict the hardness of new materials, allowing scientists to more readily find compounds suitable for use in a variety of applications. (2020-12-17)

Breaking the rules of chemistry unlocks new reaction
Scientists have broken the rules of enzyme engineering to unlock a new method for creating chemical reactions that could unlock a wide range of new applications -- from creating new drugs to food production. (2020-12-01)

Archaeology: Neanderthal thumbs better adapted to holding tools with handles
Neanderthal thumbs were better adapted to holding tools in the same way that we hold a hammer, according to a paper published in Scientific Reports. (2020-11-26)

DNA sleuths target ivory poachers
The tiniest amount of DNA is being accurately analysed to identify the origins of old ivory. This clever new technique has the potential to thwart international ivory poachers, by placing the origins of ivory pieces into accurate source locations, thereby identifying specific areas where ivory poachers are actively operating. (2020-10-26)

New tool pulls elusive COVID-19 marker from human blood
Researchers at McMaster University and SQI Diagnostics in Canada have created a surface that repels every other element of human blood except an elusive cytokine critical to understanding the progress of COVID-19 in individual patients. (2020-10-20)

Study finds lowering nicotine decreases addictiveness of smoking in vulnerable populations
A study in JAMA Network Open provides evidence that, even in smokers from vulnerable populations, reducing nicotine content to low levels decreases addictiveness - a timely finding as the Food and Drug Administration considers a policy to lower nicotine content in all cigarettes sold in the U.S. (2020-10-20)

Low-metallicity globular star cluster challenges formation models
On the outskirts of the nearby Andromeda Galaxy, researchers have unexpectedly discovered a globular cluster (GC) - a massive congregation of relic stars - with a very low abundance of chemical elements heavier than hydrogen and helium (known as its metallicity), according to a new study. (2020-10-15)

Underwater robots to autonomously dock mid-mission to recharge and transfer data
Robots exploring deep bodies of water can only go so far before needing to recharge and upload data. Purdue University engineers have designed a mobile docking station system that would help them go farther. (2020-10-06)

210Pb dating of marine sedimentary cores
Fourteen laboratories participated in this interlaboratory comparison exercise (ILC). The results indicated good analytical performance by the participating laboratories, but the results of the 210Pb dating did not reach the desired level of satisfaction. (2020-10-05)

New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization. In an article recently featured in the journal Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, Nishant Malik, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, outlined the new technique he developed and showed how shifting monsoon patterns led to the demise of the Indus Valley Civilization, a Bronze Age civilization contemporary to Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. (2020-09-03)

Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
In a new study published in The Holocene, researchers from the Max Planck Society in Jena together with Saudi and international collaborators, present the first detailed study of 'mustatil' stone structures in the Arabian Desert. These are vast structures made of stone piled into rectangles, which are some of the oldest large-scale structures in the world. They give insights into how early pastoralists survived in the challenging landscapes of semi-arid Arabia. (2020-08-25)

Controlling the electron spin: Flip it quickly but carefully
Over the past two decades, a new area at the interface of semiconductor physics, electronics and quantum mechanics has been gaining popularity among theoretical physicists and experimenters. This new field is called spintronics, and one of its main tasks is to learn how to control the spin of charge carriers in well known semiconductor structures. (2020-08-19)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

Drones and artificial intelligence show promise for conservation of farmland bird nests
Every spring, a large number of ground-nests of farmland birds are accidentally destroyed by mechanical operations, such as ploughing and sowing. A new study from the University of Helsinki shows for the first time that such nests can be located using a drone in combination with artificial intelligence. (2020-07-14)

Jurassic fossils from northeastern China reveal morphological stasis in the catkin-yew
Dong and colleagues studied well-preserved plant fossils from the Middle-Late Jurassic Daohugou Bed in eastern Inner Mongolia, northeastern China. These fossils closely resemble the extant catkin-yews Amentotaxus. They provide unequivocal evidence that the catkin-yews have undergone little morphological change over at least ~160 million years. Like ginkgo, the catkin-yews are living fossils that provide an important new example of evolutionary stasis. (2020-07-11)

Fluorine enables separation-free 'chiral chromatographic analysis'
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently developed a new platform for rapid chiral analysis, producing chromatogram-like output without the need for separation. (2020-07-02)

NUS and Stanford researchers uncover a new mindset that predicts success
To succeed in modern life, people need to accomplish challenging tasks effectively. Many successful entrepreneurs, businesspeople, students, athletes and more, tend to be more strategic -- and hence, more effective -- than others at meeting such challenges. A new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that one important psychological factor behind their success may be a 'strategic mindset'. (2020-06-09)

New discovery advances optical microscopy
New Illinois ECE research is advancing the field of optical microscopy, giving the field a critical new tool to solve challenging problems across many fields of science and engineering including semiconductor wafer inspection, nanoparticle sensing, material characterization, biosensing, virus counting, and microfluidic monitoring. (2020-06-05)

No laughing matter
A new study involving a scientific analysis of the prevalence of 'LOL' in students' text messages demonstrates important potential applications for classroom learning. The study, 'Linguistics in General Education: Expanding Linguistics Course Offerings through Core Competency Alignment,' will be published in the June 2020 issue of the scholarly journal Language. An advance version of the article may be found at https://www.linguisticsociety.org/sites/default/files/LSA962101_0.pdf. (2020-05-27)

Target trials support drug safety in pregnant patients
Out of concern for fetal safety, pregnant people have typically been excluded from drug trials. And when human health is on the line, drug studies assessing fetal safety in animal models may be viewed as far from definitive. (2020-05-27)

The malaria parasite P. vivax can remain in the spleen upon expression of certain proteins
The malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax can adhere to human spleen cells through the expression of so-called variant proteins. These are the conclusions of a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa' and the Germans Trias i Pujol Institute (IGTP). The results, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that this could represent an additional challenge to eliminating the disease. (2020-05-18)

Written WhatsApps work like a spontaneous informal conversation
The emergence of new means of communication via the Internet has brought about new genres of discourse, understood as socially situated communication practices that did not previously exist, and which require studying from the linguistic standpoint. (2020-05-15)

Evidence suggests a small but important number of people will develop coronavirus-related psychosis
The review, published online ahead of print in Schizophrenia Research, found an increase in the prevalence of psychosis as a result of COVID-19 would likely be associated with viral exposure, pre-existing vulnerability and psychosocial stress. The review also suggested that people with psychosis may present a major challenge and potential infection control risk to clinical teams working with them. (2020-05-13)

Classification-coordination-collaboration
Fu et al. outlined a systems approach, Classification-Coordination-Collaboration (3C), to advance Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 3C approach provides a feasible way in which to promote the overall implementation of the SDGs in various countries worldwide, consisting of the necessary processes and essential means for advancing the SDGs. This approach allows to make SDGs realize key breakthroughs over the short-term while achieving sweeping progress over the long run. (2020-05-12)

Flies sleep when need arises to adapt to new situations
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that flies sleep more when they can't fly, possibly because sleeping helps them adapt to a challenging new situation. (2020-05-08)

Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. Their study, which has potential implications for dolphin communities around the world, investigated whether there was a way to attribute unique whistles to individual bottlenose dolphins living in Western Australia's Swan River. (2020-04-29)

Researchers create tools to help volunteers do the most good after a disaster
In the wake of a disaster, many people want to help. Researchers have now developed tools to help emergency response and relief managers coordinate volunteer efforts in order to do the most good. (2020-04-15)

The integrated catalysts can simplify pharmaceutical manufacturing
Prof. In Su Lee and his research team from POSTECH developed catalytic platforms based on metal organic frameworks. (2020-02-21)

SUTD's novel approach allows 3D printing of finer, more complex microfluidic networks
The biomedical industry, involving the engineering of complex tissue constructs and 3D architecture of blood vessels, is one of the key industries to benefit from SUTD's new development. (2020-01-30)

New scheduling tool offers both better flight choices and increased airline profits
Researchers from Dartmouth and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed an original approach to flight scheduling that, if implemented, could result in a significant increase in profits for airlines and more flights that align with passengers' preferences. The approach is presented in a paper, 'Airline Timetable Development and Fleet Assignment Incorporating Passenger Choice,' recently published in Transportation Science, the leading journal in the field of transportation analysis. (2020-01-17)

Extra benefit from epilepsy neurostimulators -- reducing comorbid neuropsychiatric symptoms
Researchers report cases of five epilepsy patients who found better treatments for deleterious neuropsychiatric symptoms like anxiety, depression, psychosis and impaired memory using data collected -- while the patients were at home -- from implanted neurostimulators placed in their brains to control their epileptic seizures. This is an extra benefit from the implanted Responsive Neurostimulator Systems, due to the system's ability to record brain electrocorticography data initiated when a patient senses an anxiety or panic attack. (2020-01-02)

How can you help your organization's expatriates succeed?
SIOP publishes white paper that explores how to promote your overseas workers' productivity and well-being. This white paper provides an overview of the experiences and challenges encountered by people who live and work outside of their home societies and introduces some of the solutions currently available to meet these challenges based on I-O psychology research. (2019-12-12)

UBCO study demonstrates dogs promote page turning
Reading in the presence of a pooch may be the page-turning motivation young children need, suggests a UBC researcher. Camille Rousseau, a doctoral student in UBC Okanagan's School of Education, recently completed a study examining the behavior of 17 children from Grades 1 to 3 while reading with and without a dog. The study was conducted with Christine Tardif-Williams, a professor at Brock University's department of child and youth studies. (2019-12-02)

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