Current Chameleon News and Events

Current Chameleon News and Events, Chameleon News Articles.
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Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters (video)
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny ''Janus balls'' that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an ordinary magnet, the researchers say. (2020-12-16)

Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians
Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue, a new Science study shows. (2020-11-05)

A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers
A species identified in 2016 as an ancient form of chameleon was misidentified at that time, say researchers, many of whom were part of the original 2016 report. (2020-11-05)

A flexible color-changing film inspired by chameleon skin (video)
Chameleons can famously change their colors to camouflage themselves, communicate and regulate their temperature. Scientists have tried to replicate these color-changing properties for stealth technologies, anti-counterfeiting measures and electronic displays, but the materials have limitations. Now, researchers have developed a flexible film that changes color in response to stretching, pressure or humidity. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-10-21)

Protein 'chameleon' colors long-term memory
Researchers model the binding structures of actin and associated proteins they believe are responsible for the formation of longterm memory. (2020-08-24)

Chameleon materials: The origin of color variation in low-dimensional perovskites
Some light-emitting diodes (LEDs) created from perovskite, a class of optoelectronic materials, emit light over a broad wavelength range. Scientists from the University of Groningen have now shown that in some cases, the explanation of why this happens is incorrect. Their new explanation should help scientists to design perovskite LEDs capable of broad-range light emission. The study was published in the journal Nature Communications on May 11. (2020-05-11)

Engineers develop 'chameleon metals' that change surfaces in response to heat
Martin Thuo and his research group have found a way to use heat to predictably and precisely change the surface structure of a particle of liquid metal. It's like a chameleon changing skin color in response to its environment. And so Thuo and his team are calling the technology 'chameleon metals.' (2020-01-13)

Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. Australian scientists have developed a molecular probe that senses the state of the proteome -- the entire set of the proteins -- by measuring the polarity of the protein environment. The fluorescence signal of the probe quantifies unfolding and its chameleon-like color shift maps the cellular regions of enhanced misfolding, says the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-01-09)

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain
A study published Oct. 10 in Current Biology has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent of the eyes or brain. Researchers now want to see if skin heals better if it's exposed to certain types of light. (2019-10-16)

A chameleon-inspired smart skin changes color in the sun
Some creatures, such as chameleons and neon tetra fish, can alter their colors to camouflage themselves, attract a mate or intimidate predators. Scientists have tried to replicate these abilities to make artificial 'smart skins,' but so far the materials haven't been robust. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have taken a page from the chameleon's playbook to develop a flexible smart skin that changes its color in response to heat and sunlight. (2019-09-11)

Chameleon inspires 'smart skin' that changes color in the sun
Chemists used photonic crystals to develop a flexible smart skin that reacts to heat and sunlight while maintaining a near constant volume. (2019-09-11)

New biosensor provides insight into the stress behaviour of plants
Researchers have developed a method with which they can further investigate an important messenger substance in plants -- phosphatidic acid. Using a new biosensor, they are able to track the activity of phosphatidic acid spatially and temporally for the first time and thus, investigate plants that are exposed to stress such as salty soils. (2019-08-27)

Color-changing artificial 'chameleon skin' powered by nanomachines
Researchers have developed artificial 'chameleon skin' that changes colour when exposed to light and could be used in applications such as active camouflage and large-scale dynamic displays. (2019-08-21)

Chameleon-inspired structural color soft robot can interact with environment
A novel structural color soft robot with both color-changing and locomotion capabilities has been developed by a research team led by Dr. DU Xuemin from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2019-07-31)

New species of tree discovered in Tanzania mountains
Researchers have discovered a new species of tree in the Usambara Mountains in Tanzania, part of the Eastern Arc Mountains, and a globally important region for species in need of conservation. (2019-07-16)

Supercomputer shows 'Chameleon Theory' could change how we think about gravity
Supercomputer simulations of galaxies have shown that Einstein's theory of General Relativity might not be the only way to explain how gravity works or how galaxies form. (2019-07-08)

Color change and behavior enable multi-colored chameleon prawns to survive
Chameleon prawns change color to camouflage themselves as the seaweed around them changes seasonally, new research shows. (2019-06-21)

Intelligent metamaterials behave like electrostatic chameleons
Chinese physicists have developed so-called metashells made of smart, adaptable metamaterials. In a recent study published in EPJ B, they show how hollow metamaterial shells can adapt to the characteristics of the materials they hold inside. (2019-04-02)

Immune cells sacrifice themselves to protect us from invading bacteria
Our immune systems are working overtime this time of year. Knowing that a bunch of dedicated immune cells are willing to explode themselves to inform other cells about the danger may offer a bit of consolation. (2018-12-11)

Chameleon-inspired nanolaser changes colors
Chameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin. Northwestern University's nanolaser changes color similarly -- by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles. (2018-06-20)

Biodiversity: All the colors of the rainbow
Madagascar is a chameleon paradise. A team of researchers has now discovered three new species, among them a beautifully colored rainbow chameleon. These species are all restricted to very small ranges, and are probably highly threatened. (2018-04-11)

A synthetic chameleon has been developed
An international team of researchers including Dmitry Ivanov, the head of laboratory of functional soft-matter systems, MSU, announced the development of a synthetic chameleon skin. Similar to its biological analogue, the synthetic skin reacts to mechanical stimuli by changing its stiffness and color. The scientists see their development as quite promising. The work was published in the recent issue of the Science journal. (2018-03-30)

Polymers that mimic chameleon skin
Biological tissues have complex mechanical properties -- soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible -- that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team (CNRS, Université de Haute-Alsace, ESRF the European Synchrotron, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Akron) has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechanics and alters color when it changes shape, like chameleon skin. It promises new materials for biomedical devices. (2018-03-29)

Red fluorescence in two steps
Scientists have identified the mechanism that allows fluorescent proteins to switch colour in two phases. They are thereby laying the groundwork for new applications in microscopy and functional analyses in biological research. (2017-09-13)

UTEP doctoral student discovers 3 chameleon species
University of Texas at El Paso doctoral candidate Daniel Hughes has discovered three new species of chameleons. The reptile trio, historically thought to be a single species, was found in different parts of the Albertine Rift in Central Africa. (2017-06-19)

Bird feathers inspire researchers to produce vibrant new colors
Nagoya University team replicates unique color of bird plumage. Raspberry-like particle systems simulate the spongy texture of Stellar's jay's blue feathers. These findings represent a new approach to artificial structural color-based pigments. (2017-05-08)

IRCM research team discovers how immunotherapy can fight some cancers
Dr. André Veillette and his team have discovered why immunotherapy would work in some patients and not at all in others. The discovery published in the prestigious journal Nature. (2017-04-19)

Metamaterial device allows chameleon-like behavior in the infrared
An electric current will not only heat a hybrid metamaterial, but will also trigger it to change state and fade into the background like a chameleon in what may be the proof-of-concept of the first controllable metamaterial device, or metadevice, according to a team of engineers. (2016-10-27)

200-million-year-old reptile had unusual, anteater-like forelimbs
A chameleon-like reptile that lived some 200 million years ago had an incredibly unique forelimb apparently adapted for digging, according to a report published in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 29. The bones of their forelimbs show a highly unusual shape along with a massive, hooked claw. (2016-10-03)

UTEP researchers innovate brain preservation technique
By figuring out how to preserve specimens in the remote locations in which they are found -- locations almost completely opposite those of a controlled laboratory or 21st century urban area -- researchers from The University of Texas at El Paso have given science one more way to study a wide range of creatures, particularly those threatened by global climate change. (2016-08-18)

How chameleons capture their prey
The mucus secreted at the tip of a chameleon's tongue has a viscosity 400 times larger than the one of human saliva. (2016-06-21)

A surprising new anole
Herpetologists from Harvard and the Dominican Republic have discovered a new species of anole lizard -- the first new lizard species identified on the island in decades. (2016-06-17)

New lizard found in Dominican Republic
A University of Toronto-led team has reported the discovery of a new lizard in the Dominican Republic, strengthening a long-held theory that communities of lizards can evolve almost identically on separate islands. The chameleon-like lizard -- a Greater Antillean anole dubbed Anolis landestoyi for the naturalist who first spotted and photographed it -- is one of the first new anole species found in the Dominican Republic in decades. (2016-06-17)

Squeezing out opal-like colors by the mile
Researchers have devised a new method for stacking microscopic marbles into regular layers, producing intriguing materials which scatter light into intense colors, and which change color when twisted or stretched. (2016-06-03)

NUS Engineering team designs novel multi-field invisible sensor
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has invented a novel camouflage technique that effectively hides thermal and electronic sensors without compromising performance. Led by Assistant Professor Qiu Cheng-Wei from the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at NUS Faculty of Engineering, the team created the world's first multifunctional camouflage shell that renders sensors invisible in both thermal and electric environments. (2016-05-27)

IU-led study reveals new insights into light color sensing and transfer of genetic traits
An international team led by Indiana University researchers has uncovered the regulation of a system that allows a globally abundant bacterium to efficiently capture sunlight and perform photosynthesis. The study, conducted in collaboration with researchers in the United States and France, is reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2016-05-05)

Single no more: First females of a Madagascan chameleon described with modern technologies
The first females of a scarcely known chameleon species from Northeast Madagascar have been described. Because of lack of genetic data, X-ray micro-computed tomography scans of the chameleon's head were used for species assignment. Regrettably, the habitats of this and many other chameleon species are highly threatened by the ongoing deforestation in Madagascar. The study is published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2016-01-27)

Welcome to the world: New chameleon emerges from wilds of Tanzania
WCS announced today that a team of scientists discovered a new species of chameleon in Tanzania. (2016-01-27)

New fluorescent nanomaterials whose inspiration was taken from plant antenna systems
One of the biggest temptations facing a scientist is to try and reproduce natural phenomena which are so fascinating given their effectiveness and perfection. This is the aim being pursued by the UPV/EHU's Molecular Spectroscopy Group which, coinciding with the International Year of Light, has designed a set of fluorescent nanomaterials which have taken their inspiration from the antenna systems of plants. (2016-01-26)

Defending your computer from cyber-attacks, Sun Tzu style
We want our computers to perform the way we expect. But what if the key to defeating malware is introducing a bit of chaos? (2016-01-21)

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