Current Chandra News and Events

Current Chandra News and Events, Chandra News Articles.
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Reclusive neutron star may have been found in famous supernova
Since astronomers captured the bright explosion of a star on February 24, 1987, researchers have been searching for the squashed stellar core that should have been left behind. A group of astronomers using data from NASA space missions and ground-based telescopes may have finally found it. (2021-02-23)

Caution: 1918 influenza provides warning for potential future pandemic reemergence
New research from Michigan State University used health data from the initial 1918 influenza spike to provide insights to what ''pandemic reemergence'' may look like for our future. (2021-02-10)

Rare blast's remains discovered in Milky Way's center
Astronomers may have found our Galaxy's first example of an unusual kind of stellar explosion. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, adds to the understanding of how some stars shatter and seed the universe with elements critical for life on Earth. (2021-02-08)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

Galaxies hit single, doubles, and triple (growing black holes)
When three galaxies collide, what happens to the huge black holes at the centers of each? A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and several other telescopes reveals new information about how many black holes are furiously growing after these galactic smash ups. (2021-01-14)

Chandra studies extraordinary magnetar
In 2020, astronomers added a new member to an exclusive family of exotic objects with the discovery of a magnetar. New observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory help support the idea that it is also a pulsar, meaning it emits regular pulses of light. (2021-01-08)

New 3D maps reveal inner workings of immune cell gene expression
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how our small genetic differences can have a tremendous effect on how our bodies respond to disease. Researchers have created 3D maps of how enhancer sequences and genes interact in several types of immune cells. Their new study in Nature Genetics opens the door to understanding individual risk for diseases from asthma to cancer. (2020-12-21)

Unmet job expectations linked to a rise in suicide, deaths of despair
The study, published in JAMA Network Open, is the first to link the rise in suicide and drug-poisoning deaths among men without a college degree to declines in working-class jobs. (2020-12-02)

VLA sky survey reveals newborn jets in distant galaxies
Comparing data from VLA sky surveys made some two decades apart revealed that the black hole-powered 'engines' at the cores of some distant galaxies have launched new, superfast jets of material during the interval between the surveys. (2020-11-19)

UMD astronomers find x-rays lingering years after landmark neutron star collision
It's been three years since the landmark detection of a neutron star merger from gravitational waves. Since that day, an international team of researchers led by University of Maryland astronomer Eleonora Troja has been continuously monitoring the subsequent radiation emissions to provide the most complete picture of such an event. Their analysis provides possible explanations for X-rays that continued to radiate from the collision long after models predicted they would stop. (2020-10-12)

Can black hole fire up cold heart of the phoenix?
Radio astronomers have detected jets of hot gas blasted out by a black hole in the galaxy at the heart of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster, located 5.9 billion light-years away in the constellation Phoenix. This is an important result for understanding the coevolution of galaxies, gas, and black holes in galaxy clusters. (2020-08-31)

NASA missions explore a 'TIE Fighter' active galaxy
Not so long ago, astronomers mapped a galaxy far, far away using radio waves and found it has a strikingly familiar shape. In the process, they discovered the object, called TXS 0128+554, experienced two powerful bouts of activity in the last century. (2020-08-25)

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada
Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species. Research to understand the reasons why this population continues to thrive, where others have not, will be used to protect the fish and its habitat - as well as to apply the knowledge to help restore other Nevada lakes that once had bountiful numbers of the iconic fish that historically reached 60 pounds. (2020-07-22)

A different slant of light
Giant clams manipulate light to assist their symbiotic partner. (2020-07-05)

Ultra-bright X-ray source awakens near a galaxy not so far away
A new ultra-bright source of X-rays has awakened in between our galactic neighbours the Magellanic Clouds, after a 26-year slumber. This is the second-closest such object known to date, with a brightness greater than a million Suns. The discovery is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (2020-06-03)

Astronomers find cosmic golden needle buried for two decades
Astronomers made innovative use of their time while sheltering at home due to the pandemic by combing through W. M. Keck Observatory and NASA archive data. They rediscovered the first Einstein ring and found the distance of its source was never measured. The researchers are the first to make the calculation and found the quasar to be 10 billion light-years away, or a redshift of z=1.849. (2020-06-01)

Race-specific lupus nephritis biomarkers
A University of Houston biomedical researcher has discovered a difference in urinary biomarker proteins of lupus nephritis in patients according to race. The findings have implications for early diagnosis and new treatments. (2020-05-05)

Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. Their study, which has potential implications for dolphin communities around the world, investigated whether there was a way to attribute unique whistles to individual bottlenose dolphins living in Western Australia's Swan River. (2020-04-29)

Genetic signature may identify mothers at risk for preeclampsia
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have identified a genetic signature combining certain maternal and fetal gene variants that are associated with a higher risk of preeclampsia. (2020-03-17)

New measure of biological age can predict health risks
People age in different ways. Biological age is a metric that scientists use to predict health risks, the relevance of which can be enhanced by combining different markers. Particularly important markers are frailty and the epigenetic clock, write researchers from Karolinska Institutet in a study published in eLife. (2020-02-11)

OU research group confirm planet-mass objects in extragalactic systems
A University of Oklahoma research group is reporting the detection of extragalactic planet-mass objects in a second and third galaxy beyond the Milky Way after the first detection in 2018. With the existing observational resources, it is impossible to directly detect planet-mass objects beyond the Milky Way and to measure its rogue planetary population. (2019-12-11)

Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens
Astronomers at MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation. (2019-10-14)

Body's ageing process accelerated by DNA changes, study suggests
DNA changes throughout a person's life can significantly increase their susceptibility to heart conditions and other age-related diseases, research suggests. (2019-09-03)

Blood clotting proteins in urine discovered as biomarkers of lupus nephritis
University of Houston biomedical engineer Chandra Mohan has discovered blood clotting proteins in the urine of patients with Lupus Nephritis which is the leading cause of death in lupus patients. The new biomarker discovery could lead to better clinical disease monitoring. (2019-08-06)

Alzheimer's gene may impact cognitive health before adulthood
In the journal Neurobiology of Aging, UC Riverside psychology Chandra Reynolds asserts that those carrying the APOE4 gene score lower on IQ tests during childhood and adolescence. And the effect was stronger in girls than in boys. APOE4 carriers are up to three times more likely to develop late-onset Alzheimer's disease, which occurs in people 65 and older. (2019-07-18)

Galaxy clusters caught in a first kiss
For the first time, astronomers have found two giant clusters of galaxies that are just about to collide. This observation can be seen as a missing 'piece of the puzzle' in our understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe, since large-scale structures -- such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies -- are thought to grow by collisions and mergers. (2019-06-24)

6.6 billion light years away: Neutron stars merger radiance observed
An international team led by Professor XUE Yongquan from University of Science and Technology announced their observation of a unique X-ray signal from 6.6 billion light years away, which provides new insights into the physics of neutron stars. (2019-04-17)

Deep space X-ray burst gives astronomers new signal to detect neutron star mergers
An international team of astronomers has discovered a new way to spot when collisions occur in distant galaxies between two neutron stars -- incredibly dense, city-sized celestial bodies that possess the most powerful magnetic fields in the universe. The team's findings validate predictions first made in 2013 by UNLV astrophysicist Bing Zhang, a member of the research team and one of the study's corresponding authors. (2019-04-16)

Researchers observe formation of a magnetar 6.5 billion light years away
Building on recent discoveries about neutron stars, a team of astronomers has identified X-ray observations that are consistent with the merger of two neutron stars. This merger is believed to have formed a magnetar, which is a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. (2019-04-11)

Doing more with less in the study of plant chemical defense
Current techniques to assess plant chemical defense require large amounts of both time and plant tissue. Researchers have developed a new, high-throughput, cost-effective method that requires only a fraction of the traditional tissue sample weight and makes it possible to investigate multiple compounds at once, look at local vs. systemic responses, and quantify environmental and genetic variation. (2019-04-03)

Stellar winds, the source material for the universe, are clumpy
Data recorded by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of a neutron star as it passed through a dense patch of stellar wind emanating from its massive companion star provide valuable insight about the structure and composition of stellar winds. (2019-01-24)

How hot are atoms in the shock wave of an exploding star?
A new method to measure the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion. (2019-01-22)

Newly identified T cells could play a role in cancer and other diseases
Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the La Jolla Institute for Immunology have identified a new type of T cell called a phospholipid-reactive T cell that is able to recognize phospholipids, the molecules that help form cells' outer membranes. The scientists also discovered that phospholipids compete with glycolipids, another type of molecule that helps form cells' outer membranes, in a way that prevents glycolipids from readily reaching the surface of a cell. (2018-12-05)

Soil's history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?
New research suggests that, over time, less phosphorus fertilizer may be necessary on agricultural fields. (2018-11-14)

How a common drug causes liver failure
A study of liver cells exposed to the common painkiller acetaminophen found a novel mechanism for the drug's toxicity at high doses. Researchers say a protein modification called glutathionylation, kicked off by acetaminophen treatment, impairs liver cell mitochondria. (2018-10-11)

Stabilizing dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane improves muscle function
In a head-to-head trial between the conventional glucocorticoid, prednisolone, and a modified glucocorticoid, vamorolone, in experimental models of LGMD2B, vamorolone improved dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane stability and repair. This correlated with increased muscle strength and decreased muscle degeneration, according to a Children's-led study published online Aug. 27, 2018, in Molecular Therapy. (2018-08-27)

One gene to rule them all: Regulating eusociality in ants
A single gene associated with insulin signaling likely drove the evolutionary rise of an ant queen's reproductive royalty, researchers suggest. (2018-07-26)

Ant study sheds light on the evolution of workers and queens
A new study in ants identifies a peptide that plays an important role in regulating reproduction. This research illuminates a potential trajectory for the evolution of distinct social castes -- workers and queens. (2018-07-26)

X-ray data may be first evidence of a star devouring a planet
MIT analysis of X-ray data suggests the first observations of a star swallowing a planet, and may also explain the star's mysterious dimming. (2018-07-18)

Can aspirin treat Alzheimer's?
regimen of low-dose aspirin potentially may reduce plaques in the brain, which will reduce Alzheimer's disease pathology and protect memory, according to neurological researchers at Rush University Medical Center, who published the results of their study today in the July issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. (2018-07-02)

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