Current Charities News and Events

Current Charities News and Events, Charities News Articles.
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Link between dual sensory loss and depression
People with combined vision and hearing loss are nearly four times more likely to experience depression and more than three times more likely to suffer chronic anxiety, according to a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology and led by Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). (2021-01-28)

Do small gifts to donors increase charity appeal ROI?
Pre-giving incentives have different effects on different outcomes. The best strategy depends on what the charity wants to achieve. (2020-11-04)

Mystery over decline in sea turtle sightings
The number of sea turtles spotted along the coasts of the UK and Ireland has declined in recent years, researchers say. (2020-10-18)

Revealed: Large discrepancies in accounting for the funding sources of some UK patient organisations
New analysis published in BMJ Open raises transparency concerns over funding to patient groups from big drug companies. (2020-09-20)

Increase in alcohol-industry funded research is a cause for concern, study suggests
A study by the University of York has found that since 2009, there has been a 56% increase in research funded by alcohol companies or affiliated organisations - with some studies making claims about the health benefits of alcohol. (2020-09-16)

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-07-07)

Clever computing puts millions into charities' hands
Charities can now begin accessing millions of pounds more in donations thanks to a small shift in how people can donate. (2020-06-01)

Tackling alcohol harms must be an integral part of the nation's recovery from COVID-19
As the UK and most other countries went into lockdown, the need to save lives from the coronavirus rightly took priority over longer term health issues. But experts writing in The BMJ today warn that 'if we don't prepare for emerging from the pandemic, we will see the toll of increased alcohol harm for a generation.' (2020-05-20)

Potential new treatment for severe dry eye disease, RCSI Research
Scientists have discovered a potential new treatment for a disease that causes severe dry eyes and dry mouth. (2020-05-05)

Passport to improved health for military veterans
A healthcare 'passport' to access NHS and other well-being services has been beneficial for the mental health of veterans and provides them with a sense of identity, according to research published in the BMJ Military Health. (2020-04-03)

Babies with brain tumors could benefit from targeted treatment
Brain cancer in infants is biologically distinct from other childhood brain tumors and could be successfully treated with targeted drugs, a new study has shown. In the largest and most comprehensive study of infant gliomas to date, scientists found that these tumors are molecularly different from those in older children, helping explain why they tend to be less aggressive. (2020-04-01)

Local community involvement crucial to restoring tropical peatlands
New research has found that local community involvement is crucial to restoring Indonesia's peatlands -- unspoilt peatlands act as a carbon sink and play an important role in reducing global carbon emissions. They are also a crucial habitat for birds and animals, including endangered species such as orang-utans and tigers. (2020-03-26)

Animal-assisted interventions positive for people's health but more research is needed
The impact of animal-assisted interventions for both patients and health services could be substantial, but more rigorous research is needed, says Dr. Elena Ratschen and Professor Trevor Sheldon from the University of York. (2019-12-17)

You did what with my donation? When donors feel betrayed by charities
When people learn that a charitable contribution they earmarked for a specific project was used for another cause, they feel betrayed -- and often punish the charity, new research from Washington State University indicates. (2019-12-13)

New study identifies barriers to conservation success
Inability to find or retain skilled staff and issues around local community buy-in are just some of the hurdles preventing conservation charities from achieving their goals, a ground-breaking new study has found. (2019-12-11)

World first on-the-spot test for synthetic drug 'spice' developed at University of Bath
A simple saliva test to detect if someone has recently taken the street drug ''spice'' has been developed at the University of Bath - the first such test ever created. (2019-10-30)

Many of the deadliest cancers receive the least amount of research funding
Many of the deadliest or most common cancers get the least amount of nonprofit research funding, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. 'Embarrassing' or stigmatized cancers, like lung and liver, are underfunded. Colon, endometrial, liver and bile duct, cervical, ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancers were all poorly funded compared to how common they are and how many deaths they cause, the study found. In contrast, breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma and pediatric cancers were all well-funded, respective to their impact on society. (2019-07-18)

PSU study finds people prefer to donate time -- even when charities lose out
Each year during the holiday season, soup kitchens and charities alike are flooded with offers to volunteer. But is a donation of your time most beneficial to the charity, or would a financial contribution provide more value? Researchers from Portland State University and Texas A&M University wondered what drives volunteering -- especially when a monetary donation would have more impact. Their study, ''Why Do People Volunteer? An Experimental Analysis of Preferences for Time Donations,'' was published in this spring in the journal Management Science. (2019-06-24)

Study offers comprehensive roadmap for regulating political activity by nonprofits
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer's comprehensive approach yields surprising and controversial solutions, beginning with the creation of a simple and broad definition of political activity that charities will be prohibited from engaging in. (2019-06-05)

Scientists call on funders to make research freely available immediately
Scientific research usually takes months to be published by academic journals, and once it is, many of the papers can only be read by scientists from wealthy institutes that subscribe to the journals. Over the years, there have been various attempts to make research more widely available, but most papers remain behind paywalls and scientists complain that the peer review process at journals now takes longer than ever. (2019-06-04)

Transparency from charities about how funds are used builds trust and increases giving
Charitable and humanitarian organizations are increasingly tapping into a $30 billion crowdfunding market, not only to raise funds but to build donors' trust by being more transparent, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business. (2019-04-15)

Children should help choose the charities their schools and families support
Children as young as four should be given more autonomy to help choose the charities their schools and families support, according to new research from the University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University. (2019-04-04)

People more likely to be generous towards charities if they donate before a windfall
People will donate more to charity if they make a pledge before receiving an unexpected cash windfall, a study has shown. (2019-02-19)

Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism. A new test provides researchers with a better understanding of the source of this difficulty. (2019-01-25)

UK's reliance on unpaid carers is unsustainable, research warns
New Work Foundation research highlights the profound impact caring responsibilities have on a person's employment with those providing 50 hours or more care per week being 36 percent less likely to be employed compared to non-carers. Findings suggest women are disproportionately affected, with 61 percent of female carers being employed in comparison to 68 percent of men. Those aged 45-54 are twice as likely as any other group to have reduced their working hours due to caring responsibilities. (2018-11-28)

New study shows that mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons
Finnish-American research group has studied whether parents' gender preferences and investment in offspring are affected by their status, wealth, education or childhood environment. Instead, parental preferences were best predicted by their sex. These results help to make sense of the often contradictory findings on offspring sex preferences. (2018-11-06)

Political competition is hurting our charitable giving
As the midterm election heats up and the fallout of the Supreme Court nomination rings across the political divide, a new study presents a unique angle of American politics: how party affiliation affects charitable donations. Researchers representing four institutions found voters who live in counties where political competition is high give less to charity. (2018-10-24)

The warm glow of kindness is real -- Sussex study confirms
The 'warm glow' of kindness is real -- even when there's nothing in it for you. We feel the benefit of kind acts regardless of whether they are altruistic or strategically motivated. (2018-09-27)

Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues
Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found. After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, according to Lynne Hall, Dr.P.H., R.N., associate dean of research and professor at the UofL School of Nursing. (2018-09-14)

Half of European clinical trials have not complied with EU rules on reporting results
Half of clinical trials on the EU register have not reported results, despite rules requiring results to be posted within 12 months of completion, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2018-09-12)

Mayo Clinic researchers identify a potential new approach to treat HER2 positive breast cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an important new pathway by which HER2 positive breast cancers grow and have discovered that a dietary supplement called cyclocreatine may block the growth of HER2 positive breast cancer. Their findings were published today in Cell Metabolism. (2018-08-30)

One in four intensive care patients return to hospital, study shows
A quarter of intensive care patients are readmitted to hospital shortly after returning home and some of these readmissions are avoidable, research suggests. (2018-05-31)

Infant mortality rates higher in areas with more Christian fundamentalists, study finds
The odds of an infant dying before their first birthday are higher in counties with greater proportions of conservative Protestants, especially fundamentalists, than in counties with more mainline Protestants and Catholics, according to a new Portland State University study. (2018-05-29)

Should doctors recommend e-cigarettes to help smokers quit?
The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence offers guidance for doctors to advise people who are trying to quit smoking -- that e-cigarettes are helpful tools when trying to quit. However, emerging evidence suggests that e-cigarettes as actually used, actually depress, not assist cigarette smoking cessation for most users, and are a gateway to youth smoking. So, should they be recommended? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2018-04-25)

Scientists find treasure trove of 110 genes linked to breast cancer
Scientists have linked 110 genes to an increased risk of breast cancer in the most comprehensive study ever to unpick the genetics of the disease. Their study used a pioneering genetic technique to analyse maps of DNA regions linked to an inherited risk of breast cancer and identify the actual genes involved in raising a woman's risk. Researchers also linked 32 of the new genes to the length of time women survived breast cancer. (2018-03-12)

Alien honeybees could cause plant extinction
New research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators. (2018-02-08)

Austerity policies lie at heart of soaring homelessness and related health harms, argue experts
Austerity policies lie at the heart of soaring homelessness across England, with serious health implications for those affected, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2018-01-29)

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2018-01-17)

Success in community college aided by comprehensive case management, study finds
New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that students who participated in the full comprehensive case management program were significantly more likely to stay enrolled and to graduate within six semesters. (2018-01-08)

The BMJ reveals hundreds of drug company deals that commissioning groups fail to declare
Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England have accepted hundreds of payments from drug companies that they have not disclosed to patients and the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today. (2018-01-03)

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