Current Cheating News and Events

Current Cheating News and Events, Cheating News Articles.
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Academic dishonesty: Fear and justifications
Why do some students cheat by looking over someone's shoulder, furtively searching for test answers on the internet, using cheat sheets during exams or paying others to complete their coursework? How do they rationalise their behaviour to continue to think of themselves as decent people? A study conducted by the HSE Centre for Sociology of Higher Education offers some answers. (2020-12-02)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

Computer scientists launch counteroffensive against video game cheaters
University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists have devised a new weapon against video game players who cheat. The researchers developed their approach for detecting cheaters using the popular first-person shooter game Counter-Strike. But the mechanism can work for any massively multiplayer online (MMO) game that sends data traffic to a central server. Their research was published online Aug. 3 in IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing. (2020-11-16)

Cheaters don't always win: species that work together do better
The sign of a healthy personal relationship is one that is equally mutual - where you get out just as much as you put in. Nature has its own version of a healthy relationship. A team of researchers from Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences investigated these interactions, known as mutualisms, and why they are so critical for healthy environments. (2020-10-19)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

New NH poll: Biden leads Trump in run for president
Former Vice President Joe Biden has an eight-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely New Hampshire voters, according to a new poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion. (2020-09-29)

New NC poll: Biden and Trump tied
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are deadlocked in the race for North Carolina's 15 electoral votes, according to a new poll released today. (2020-09-29)

New Texas poll: Trump up in close race
President Donald Trump has an apparent lead over former Vice President Joe Biden in a close contest for Texas' 38 electoral votes according to a new poll of likely voters in the state released today. (2020-09-29)

'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing. (2020-09-22)

Promises found to reduce cheating in large study of adolescents
New research has found that adolescents who promised to be truthful were less likely to 'cheat' than those who did not, even when they could not be found out. (2020-08-03)

Invisible barriers cut down on cheating
Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing. (2020-07-27)

How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage. However, this kind of cooperation contradicts the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin: Why would organisms invest valuable resources to help others? Instead, they should rather use them for themselves, in order to win the evolutionary competition with other species. A new study led by Christian Kost from the University of Osnabrück now solved this puzzle. (2020-07-23)

The paradox of dormancy: Why sleep when you can eat?
Why do predators sometimes lay dormant eggs -- eggs which are hardy, but take a long time to hatch, and are expensive to produce? That is the question that SUTD researchers set out to answer in a recent paper. (2020-02-15)

How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired». What Alec Baldwin introduces in a famous Glengarry Glen Ross scene is a particularly crude form of performance ranking and what follows in the movie is a story of cheating and infighting as actors attempt to get ahead in the raking. In the real life, the risks with performance rankings are similar, Bocconi Professor Cassandra Chambers finds. (2020-01-27)

Egg trading between hermaphroditic fish: Why would you give when you can just take?
The sex life of hermaphroditic animals is determined by one fundamental question: Who assumes the female role and produces the costly eggs? Hamlets avoid this dilemma by engaging in reciprocal egg trading. Scientists have now used microeconomic models to analyze the circumstances required for this complex system of trading to work. Their results have been published in The American Naturalist. (2020-01-14)

Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers
A study co-authored by an SF State marketing professor finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace. (2019-11-27)

In and out with 10-minute electrical vehicle recharge
Electric vehicle owners may soon be able to pull into a fueling station, plug their car in, go to the restroom, get a cup of coffee and in 10 minutes, drive out with a fully charged battery, according to a team of engineers. (2019-10-30)

Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals
A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. Felix Funk and Christoph Hauert of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-08-08)

2015 Volkswagen emissions scandal damaged other German automakers' reputations and profits
Rüdiger Bachmann at the University of Notre Dame and his co-authors studied the scandal and found that the fallout from Volkswagen's wrongdoing cost other German car makers billions of dollars in sales. (2019-08-05)

Cheater, cheater: Human Behavior Lab studies cheating as innate trait
The Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab took a closer look at cheating during periods of relative economic abundance and scarcity to determine whether cheating for monetary gain is a product of the economic environment. During the experiment, they found evidence that cheating is more likely caused by an individual's propensity to cheat than external factors. (2019-08-01)

Visible punishment institutions are key in promoting large-scale cooperation: Study
New international research by Monash University has found that one way to overcome social dilemmas is through visible prosocial punishment -- the existence of collective institutions that punish individuals who don't cooperate. (2019-07-26)

Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet
The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' -- minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end. (2019-06-20)

Tempted to cheat on a written exam? Artificial intelligence is 90% certain to nab you
Combining big data with artificial intelligence has allowed University of Copenhagen researchers to determine whether you wrote your assignment or whether a ghostwriter penned it for you -- with nearly 90 percent accuracy. (2019-05-29)

To cheat or not to cheat? Researchers uncover the moral dilemmas of doping
Elite athletes are less likely to take banned substances if they consider the morality of what they are doing, and not just the health consequences of doping, according to a new study led by the University of Birmingham and funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). (2019-05-09)

A social bacterium with versatile habits
Related individuals of a soil bacterial species live in cooperative groups and exhibit astonishing genetic and behavioral diversity. ETH researchers recently published these findings in Science. (2019-03-22)

Study finds natural selection favors cheaters
Natural selection predicts that mutualisms -- interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties -- should fall apart. Individuals that gain from the cooperation of others but do not reciprocate (so-called cheaters) should arise and destabilize mutualisms. Yet to date, surprisingly little evidence of such cheating or destabilization exists. A team of biologists at the University of California, Riverside, has now found strong evidence of this cheating. (2019-03-19)

How intelligent is artificial intelligence?
Scientists are putting AI systems to a test. Researchers from TU Berlin, Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have developed a method to provided a glimpse into the diverse 'intelligence' spectrum observed in current AI systems, specifically analyzing these AI systems with a novel technology that allows automatized analysis and quantification. (2019-03-12)

Scientists expose hidden risks of diarrhoeal disease
New research identifies a rapidly evolving new subspecies of the cryptosporidium parasite -- a leading cause of diarrhoeal disease in children worldwide. The study sheds new light on how this parasite has evolved the ability to spread more easily between people. Researchers sequenced and compared whole genomes from over 20 different cryptosporidium cases to find out more about the parasite and how it infects people. Their work will help public health interventions aimed at preventing the spread of the disease. (2019-03-04)

High stakes decision-making causes a little more cheating, a lot less charity
The age old adage of virtue being its own reward may not hold true in the corporate world -- in fact, honourable acts could lead workers to behave more selfishly later on, new research has shown. (2018-10-18)

Successful mouse couples talk out infidelity in calm tones
The quality of conversations between California mice couples after one partner has been unfaithful can help predict which mouse pairs will successfully produce a litter of mouse pups and which males are good fathers, according to a study published recently by the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution in a special issue on the evolution of monogamy. (2018-10-04)

No evidence that moral reminders reduce cheating behavior, replication effort concludes
Scientists report they were unable to reproduce the results of a well-known study showing that people are less likely to cheat on a task after making a list of the Ten Commandments. Their findings are published in a Registered Replication Report (RRR) in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-09-04)

Latest study reveals sharp rise in essay cheating globally, with millions of students involved
A breakthrough study by Swansea University has revealed that one in seven students are using essay-mills -- representing around 31 million globally. (2018-08-31)

Research on pine sawflies sheds light on the evolution of cooperation
Pine sawflies terrify forest owners, but they help researchers understand the evolution of cooperation. A study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä shows that ecological context affects the frequency of cooperators and freeloaders in groups of pine sawflies. (2018-08-02)

Cheating on cheaters
A new study, to be published in Current Biology on June 28, proposes new strategies to induce the collapse of bacterial populations. A research team led by Karina Xavier, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC, Portugal), identified novel ways to promote so-called ''cheating behavior'' in bacterial communities that can lead to the collapse of the bacterial population, simply by manipulating the chemical composition of the environment. (2018-06-28)

Core electron topologies in chemical bonding
YNU researchers resolve the age-old mystery of why silicon cannot replace carbon in organic compounds. A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides for the first time reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. Other elements with a similar propensity as carbon to reshape their core electron nodal structures upon chemical bonding are proposed. (2018-06-12)

Why do older male birds father more illegitimate children?
When female birds have chicks as the result of an extra-marital fling, the fathers are almost always older males, and scientists are finding out why. (2018-05-31)

People with ASD risk being manipulated because they can't tell when they're being lied to
A new study shows that the ability to distinguish truth from lies is diminished in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) -- putting them at greater risk of being manipulated. (2018-05-22)

Fluid dynamics may play key role in evolution of cooperation
In a new study, physicists at the University of Notre Dame examined how the mechanical properties of an environment may shape the social evolution of microbial populations. (2018-05-22)

Microbes are savvy investors when contributing to the common good
UK scientists investigating the fundamental question in biology as to why individuals have evolved to cooperate rather than simply exploiting the contributions of their rivals, have found that microbes vary their contribution to maximize the return of investment. (2018-05-09)

As hummingbirds dive, twisting tail feathers direct sound at potential mates
Rather than singing to their mates, Costa's hummingbird males court females with musical, high-speed dives. Their 'song' is produced as the wind whistles through their tail feathers. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on April 12 have found that the diving males twist half their tails as they whiz through the air, apparently to aim the sound in the direction of their potential mates. (2018-04-12)

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