Current Cheetah News and Events

Current Cheetah News and Events, Cheetah News Articles.
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Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes
Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research. (2021-02-08)

Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests. (2021-01-15)

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. Moving their breeding herds out of these hotspots, farmers reduced livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close cooperation between scientists from Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. (2020-12-07)

Texas A&M lion genetics study uncovers major consequences of habitat fragmentation
Over the course of only a century, humanity has made an observable impact on the genetic diversity of the lion population. That's the conclusion of a recently published study by Drs. Caitlin Curry and James Derr from the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-11-03)

Sea skaters are a super source of inspiration
A study of marine Halobates species highlights how their waterproofing techniques, size and acceleration capability helped them colonize the ocean. (2020-05-15)

Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. The new soft robotics are also capable of grabbing objects delicately -- or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects. (2020-05-08)

Preservation of testicular cells to save endangered feline species
A research team at the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed a method to isolate and cryopreserve testicular cells. This will allow the safekeeping and biobanking of gametes and other cells of the male reproductive tract of threatened or endangered feline species. The findings have been published in the scientific journal 'Cryobiology.' (2020-03-31)

Hair in 'stress': Analyze with care
Similar to humans, wild animals' reaction to disturbance is accompanied by releasing hormones, such as cortisol. To understand the impact of various 'stress' factors on wildlife, scientists first need to determine the baseline levels of relevant hormones for each species. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now uncovered possible pitfalls of the commonly used hormone analysis method that overestimate concentrations of cortisol and thus lead to overstated conclusions. (2020-03-12)

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago
The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors. (2020-01-17)

Mammals' complex spines are linked to high metabolisms; we're learning how they evolved
Mammals' backbones are weird. They're much more complex than the spines of other land animals like reptiles. Scientists wanted to find out how these complex backbones evolved in the first place. They discovered that the process was marked by big, dramatic evolutionary changes, and that it's linked to mammals being active animals with high metabolisms. (2019-11-07)

Fun run
Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%. (2019-10-08)

Early first pregnancy is the key to successful reproduction of cheetahs in zoos
Cheetah experts in many zoos around the world are at a loss. Despite all their efforts, these cats often do not reproduce in the desired manner. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, together with colleagues from the Allwetterzoo M√ľnster, have now found a key to the issue: the age of the mothers at the first pregnancy is the decisive factor. (2019-07-09)

Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex
Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. They analyzed fossil finds that were already discovered 30 years ago in Thailand. Both species are distant relatives of T. rex, but with a somewhat more primitive structure. They were efficient predators. The results have now been published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. (2019-05-28)

Study highlights power of play
Through simple games and day-to-day tasks, parents can help their children learn self-regulation, a skill considered essential for success, a University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found. (2019-03-21)

Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed. (2019-03-04)

Maasai farmers only kill lions when they attack livestock
Maasai farmers do not kill lions for retribution whenever they lose sheep or cattle, new research shows. (2019-02-26)

Lung lavage as new test method improves tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros
An international team of scientists led by institutes in Berlin and Jena, Germany, performed repeated lung lavage as a new approach for tuberculosis diagnosis in rhinoceros. Subsequent genetic tests reliably identified mycobacteria in the animals' respiratory fluids -- with minimal stress and risk for the rhinos. The study has been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-12-12)

Biomechanics of chewing depend more on animal size, not diet
Researchers report that the jaw joint bone, the center around which chewing activity revolves (literally), appears to have evolved based more on an animal's size than what it eats. (2018-08-30)

In the race of life, the tortoise beats the hare every time
Researchers have discovered that, over the long-run, the race will indeed go to the slower, steadier animal. An analysis of the reported speeds of animals based on land, air and water shows that some of the world's fastest animals are actually some of the slowest when their movements are averaged throughout their lifetimes, giving credence to Aesop's fable 'The Tortoise and the Hare.' (2018-08-27)

'Blind' Cheetah 3 robot can climb stairs littered with obstacles
MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. The 90-pound mechanical beast -- about the size of a full-grown Labrador -- is intentionally designed to do all this without relying on cameras or any external environmental sensors. (2018-07-05)

Territory holders and floaters: Two spatial tactics of male cheetahs
Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal ECOSPHERE. (2018-06-28)

Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover state of matter hidden by superconductivity
A research team led by Jigang Wang of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory has developed a new quantum switching scheme that gives them access to new and hidden states of matter. If researchers can learn to control the hidden state, further stabilize it and determine whether it's suitable for quantum logic operations, it could allow researchers to use it for quantum computing and other practical functions. The journal Nature Materials has just published a paper about the discovery. (2018-06-04)

Leopard meals: Females go for diversity
Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia. (2018-05-08)

Revealing the remarkable nanostructure of human bone
Using advanced 3D nanoscale imaging of the mineral in human bone, research teams from the University of York and Imperial College London have shown that the mineral crystals of bone have a hierarchical structure integrated into the larger-scale make-up of the skeleton. (2018-05-03)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed hunting
The world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates. (2018-02-02)

Southern Africa's cheetah population much smaller than believed
Populations of cheetahs in southern Africa have declined as farming and other human activities push deeper into the big cats' range, a study led by researchers at Duke University and the Claws Conservancy finds. Fewer than 3,600 adult cheetahs - 11 percent fewer than estimated in 2015 - remain in the region, which is home to the largest population of free-roaming cheetahs left on Earth. Farmer-cheetah conflicts and other human-related pressures are contributing to the decline. (2017-12-12)

Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs
A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline support a call to list the cheetah as 'Endangered' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. (2017-12-11)

Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first time
A large species of green algae was discovered alive in North America for the first time ever, with the only previous record being fossils dating back to the time of the dinosaurs. (2017-07-31)

Why Tyrannosaurus was a slow runner
A beetle is slower than a mouse, which is slower than a rabbit, which is slower than a cheetah... which is slower than an elephant? No! For small to medium-sized animals, larger also means faster, but for really large animals, when it comes to speed, everything goes downhill again. For the first time, researchers have described in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution how this parabola-like relationship between body size and speed comes about. (2017-07-17)

African lions face same threats as extinct Ice Age ancestors
The extinction trends that caused the demise of several Ice Age species, including many of the sabre-toothed family, may be a threat to wildlife today and particularly to the African lion, a new Oxford University research collaboration has revealed. (2017-05-10)

African lions under same threats as extinct sabre-toothed tigers faced
African lions are under the same threats extinct sabre-toothed tigers faced. (2017-05-10)

Using dogs to find cats
Investigators are using specially-trained detection dogs to determine the numbers and distribution of cheetah in a region of Western Zambia. The research represents the first demonstration of this strategy for wide-ranging species that are often threatened. (2017-02-23)

Sprinting towards extinction? Cheetah numbers crash globally
A new study led by ZSL, Panthera and WCS confirms that the iconic cheetah is sprinting towards extinction. (2016-12-26)

Timing may be key to understanding cognitive problems in Parkinson's disease
University of Iowa research shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and mice that lack dopamine both are missing a critical brain wave needed for timing actions -- a cognitive process that's consistently impaired in patients with PD. Brain stimulation at the same frequency as the missing brain wave restores timing ability in mice lacking dopamine, suggesting that it might be possible to use brain stimulation to improve cognitive problems in PD. (2016-12-15)

Wild cat brains: An evolutionary curveball
The brains of wild cats don't necessarily respond to the same evolutionary pressures as those of their fellow mammals, humans and primates, indicates a surprising new study led by a Michigan State University neuroscientist. (2016-10-31)

New analysis shows threats to 8,000 Red List species
Less than a month away from the kick-off the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii, a team of scientists report in the journal Nature that three quarters of the world's threatened species are imperiled because people are converting their habitat into agricultural lands and over-harvesting their populations. (2016-08-10)

Estimates of cheetah numbers are 'guesswork', say researchers
Current estimates of the number of cheetahs in the wild are 'guesswork', say the authors of a new study which finds that the population in the cheetah stronghold of Maasai Mara, Kenya, is lower than previously thought. (2016-05-03)

Research-based exercise program turning preschoolers into 'Fit Kids'
Reuben Brough is running around a gym at a local youth center waving his hands in the air and screeching like a cheetah. A stream of children is in hot pursuit of him and four other students from the University of Vermont who implore the preschoolers to 'catch the cheetah.' It looks like total chaos, but there's a method to the madness, which is really a highly structured, research-based fitness program called Children and Teachers (CATs) on the Move. (2016-05-02)

Island foxes may be 'least variable' of all wild animals
In comparison to their relatives on the mainland, the Channel Island foxes living on six of California's Channel Islands are dwarves, at two-thirds the size. The island foxes most likely evolved from gray foxes brought to the northern islands by humans over 7,000 years ago. Some think island foxes may have been partially domesticated by Native-Americans. Like many island species, they have little fear of humans. (2016-04-21)

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