Current Cheetahs News and Events

Current Cheetahs News and Events, Cheetahs News Articles.
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Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests. (2021-01-15)

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. Moving their breeding herds out of these hotspots, farmers reduced livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close cooperation between scientists from Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. (2020-12-07)

Texas A&M lion genetics study uncovers major consequences of habitat fragmentation
Over the course of only a century, humanity has made an observable impact on the genetic diversity of the lion population. That's the conclusion of a recently published study by Drs. Caitlin Curry and James Derr from the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. (2020-11-03)

The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day. The discovery contradicts previous assumptions and could be used to help protect the endangered feline, whose populations have dwindled by 85 percent over the past century. (2020-09-10)

South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears - ''a mosaic'' of unequal protection across different land management types. The private areas do not play the same role, and may not be a conservation panacea. (2020-08-27)

Jellyfish-inspired soft robots can outswim their natural counterparts
Engineering researchers have developed soft robots inspired by jellyfish that can outswim their real-life counterparts. More practically, the new jellyfish-bots highlight a technique that uses pre-stressed polymers to make soft robots more powerful. (2020-07-01)

Inspired by cheetahs, researchers build fastest soft robots yet
Inspired by the biomechanics of cheetahs, researchers have developed a new type of soft robot that is capable of moving more quickly on solid surfaces or in the water than previous generations of soft robots. The new soft robotics are also capable of grabbing objects delicately -- or with sufficient strength to lift heavy objects. (2020-05-08)

Tourist photographs are a cheap and effective way to survey wildlife
Tourists on safari can provide wildlife monitoring data comparable to traditional surveying methods, suggests research appearing July 22, 2019 in the journal Current Biology. The researchers analyzed 25,000 photographs from 26 tour groups to survey the population densities of five top predators (lions, leopards, cheetahs, spotted hyenas, and wild dogs) in northern Botswana, making it one of the first studies to use tourist photographic data for this purpose. (2019-07-22)

Early first pregnancy is the key to successful reproduction of cheetahs in zoos
Cheetah experts in many zoos around the world are at a loss. Despite all their efforts, these cats often do not reproduce in the desired manner. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, together with colleagues from the Allwetterzoo M√ľnster, have now found a key to the issue: the age of the mothers at the first pregnancy is the decisive factor. (2019-07-09)

Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)
Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops. (2019-05-02)

Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip
MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed. (2019-03-04)

More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope
African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it's a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores. New research led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Ecological Applications, however, shows that's not always the case. (2019-03-01)

Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey
Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago. (2019-01-11)

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies
A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for their young before they starve. (2018-11-15)

When mammal ancestors evolved flexible shoulders, their backbones changed too
Dolphins swim, horses gallop, and humans walk on two legs -- mammals are able to move in lots of different ways. That's because we have unique backbones. And scientists exploring how mammals' backbones evolved have discovered that the key to our complex spines lies in mammals' flexible shoulders. (2018-09-20)

Surviving large carnivores have far-reaching impact
Anywhere large-bodied mammalian carnivore species are present, other, smaller carnivores are less likely to occur, according to an international team of researchers that conducted the first global assessment of carnivore interactions using camera trap data. (2018-08-08)

Ecology and AI
Using more than three million photographs from the citizen science project Snapshot Serengeti, researchers trained a deep learning algorithm to automatically identify, count and describe animals in their natural habitats. Results showed the system was able to automate the process for up to 99.3 percent of images as accurately as human volunteers. (2018-07-10)

How 'eavesdropping' African herbivores respond to each other's alarm calls
Many animals live in a world characterised by a bewildering array of signals from other species. But to what extent are individuals able to extract useful information from these signals? In a new study, scientists from the Universities of Liverpool and York have for the first time tested the responses of African savanna herbivores to the alarm calls of their neighbours across the whole community. The findings reveal new insight into the adaptive and non-adaptive processes that shape this response. (2018-07-04)

Territory holders and floaters: Two spatial tactics of male cheetahs
Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal ECOSPHERE. (2018-06-28)

Researchers use artificial intelligence to identify, count, describe wild animals
Photographs that are automatically collected by motion-sensor cameras can be automatically described by deep neural networks. The result is a system that can automate animal identification for up to 99.3 percent of images while still performing at the same 96.6 percent accuracy rate of crowdsourced teams of human volunteers. (2018-06-05)

Leopard meals: Females go for diversity
Leopards, top predators of the African savannah, are known to feed on a variety of prey species. It has been largely unknown, however, whether they specialize in certain prey animals and which factors might influence prey preferences. Christian Voigt and his colleagues from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin investigated these questions by studying the diet of leopards on commercial farmland in central Namibia. (2018-05-08)

Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risks
Many of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival. (2018-04-12)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed hunting
The world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture during movement in most vertebrates. (2018-02-02)

Using footprints to identify and monitor giant pandas in the wild
Footprints left by giant pandas in the wild can be used to identify the individual panda that made them and determine its sex, a study by a Duke-led international team of scientists shows. The new identification technique uses an interactive software tool called FIT (Footprint Identification Technique) to (2017-12-21)

Southern Africa's cheetah population much smaller than believed
Populations of cheetahs in southern Africa have declined as farming and other human activities push deeper into the big cats' range, a study led by researchers at Duke University and the Claws Conservancy finds. Fewer than 3,600 adult cheetahs - 11 percent fewer than estimated in 2015 - remain in the region, which is home to the largest population of free-roaming cheetahs left on Earth. Farmer-cheetah conflicts and other human-related pressures are contributing to the decline. (2017-12-12)

Scientists urge endangered listing for cheetahs
A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa supported by the National Geographic Society reveals the dire state of one of the planet's most iconic big cats. In a study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ, researchers present evidence that low cheetah population estimates in southern Africa and population decline support a call to list the cheetah as 'Endangered' on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. (2017-12-11)

Pumas found to exhibit behaviors like social animals
Jackson, Wyoming -- Pumas, long known as solitary carnivores, are more social than previously thought, according to a new Panthera study published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances. The findings provide the first evidence of complex social strategies in any solitary carnivore -- and may have implications for multiple species, including other wild cats around the world. (2017-10-11)

Dinosaur-era plant found alive in North America for first time
A large species of green algae was discovered alive in North America for the first time ever, with the only previous record being fossils dating back to the time of the dinosaurs. (2017-07-31)

African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive cats
The elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat's caloric demands and its drive to kill. (2017-06-21)

Genetic evidence points to nocturnal early mammals
New genetic evidence suggesting that early mammals had good night-time vision adds to fossil and behavioral studies indicating that early mammals were nocturnal. (2017-04-20)

Researchers investigate evolution of bipedalism in ancient dinosaur ancestors
Paleontologists at the University of Alberta have developed a new theory to explain why the ancient ancestors of dinosaurs stopped moving about on all fours and rose up on just their two hind legs. (2017-03-03)

Decline of grass threatens world's most endangered antelope
Overgrazing, loss of elephants from poaching and lack of fires have taken away food supplies for hirola -- a large antelope that specializes on grass. (2017-02-15)

Making a scavenger -- the meat-thieving traits that have stood the test of time
Any animal -- living or dead -- can be placed on a 'scavenging scale' based on variations in a few key biological traits and the environment at hand. This scale suggests that long-extinct Tyrannosaurs and death-eater bats have a lot more in common with hyenas and albatrosses than meets the eye. (2017-02-07)

Sprinting towards extinction? Cheetah numbers crash globally
A new study led by ZSL, Panthera and WCS confirms that the iconic cheetah is sprinting towards extinction. (2016-12-26)

It's not a bird! It's not a plane! It's the fastest flying mammal, says UT study
When most people think of animals moving at high speed, they envision cheetahs or swiftly diving raptors. They can now add the Brazilian free-tailed bat -- a tiny nocturnal mammal -- to the list. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, shows that the Brazilian free-tailed bat can achieve flight speeds faster than those previously documented for any bat or bird. (2016-11-09)

Wild cat brains: An evolutionary curveball
The brains of wild cats don't necessarily respond to the same evolutionary pressures as those of their fellow mammals, humans and primates, indicates a surprising new study led by a Michigan State University neuroscientist. (2016-10-31)

New analysis shows threats to 8,000 Red List species
Less than a month away from the kick-off the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii, a team of scientists report in the journal Nature that three quarters of the world's threatened species are imperiled because people are converting their habitat into agricultural lands and over-harvesting their populations. (2016-08-10)

At the top of their game
Research by a former NCEAS postdoctoral scholar Adrian Stier highlights the factors necessary for successful apex predator recovery. (2016-05-27)

Estimates of cheetah numbers are 'guesswork', say researchers
Current estimates of the number of cheetahs in the wild are 'guesswork', say the authors of a new study which finds that the population in the cheetah stronghold of Maasai Mara, Kenya, is lower than previously thought. (2016-05-03)

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