Current Chemical Bonds News and Events

Current Chemical Bonds News and Events, Chemical Bonds News Articles.
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Study suggests teacher-student bonds may be especially important for homeless kids
A recent study of homeless preschoolers found a strong correlation between the bonds those children formed with teachers and the children's risk of behavioral and emotional problems. (2021-02-22)

Giving oxygen to the question of air quality
Volatile alkanes can rapidly acquire oxygen atoms in a free radical chain reaction, a process significant for fuel combustion and air pollution. (2021-02-18)

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature. (2021-02-18)

Self-assembly induced luminescence of Eu3+-complexes for bioimaging application
Yu Tang and Chun-Hua Yan from Lanzhou University successfully developed a nano-system with self-assembly induced luminescence (SAIL) through the design of the structure and assembly method of the Eu3+ complex. The assembled Eu3+-complex nanoparticles can be applied in biosensing and imaging by fluorescence intensity and lifetime assays. (2021-02-16)

The water surface is a fantastic place for chemical reactions
Using an advanced technique, scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have demonstrated that a chemical reaction powered by light takes place ten thousand times faster at the air-water interface--what we usually call the water surface--than in the bulk of the water, even when the light has equivalent energy. This finding could help our understanding of the many important chemical and biological processes that take place at the water surface. (2021-02-15)

Researchers measure temperature effect of plasmon in chemical reactions using organic "sensors"
The researchers of TPU together with their colleagues from Russian and foreign scientific centers have found a way to estimate the temperature of a chemical reaction activated by pseudo-particles - plasmons. Two organic molecules served as ultra-small sensors or thermometers. (2021-02-15)

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses
POSTECH professor Junsuk Rho's research team develops a transparent silicon without visible light loss by controlling the silicon atomic structure. (2021-02-14)

Lemurs show there's no single formula for lasting love
Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate -- some lemurs and other animals do, too. Duke researchers are mapping the hormone receptors that underlie these primates' ability to pair up for the long haul. Their findings suggest the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others. (2021-02-12)

Combination of pine scent and ozone as super source of particulate emissions
Scientists have managed to figure out why conifer forests produce so many fine particles into the atmosphere. Aerosol particles are particularly abundant when ?-pinene, the molecule responsible for the characteristic pattern of pine trees reacts with atmospheric ozone. (2021-02-11)

Stable armchairlike hexazine N6 ring in tungsten hexanitride
We have successfully synthesized WN6 at 126-165 GPa after laser heating up to ?3500 K. The WN6 phase contains novel armchairlike N6 rings. Future efforts in the synthesis and recovery of TMNs will lead to a wealth of knowledge in the novel chemistry and physical properties of the single-bonded hexazine-bearing nitrides. (2021-02-10)

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed
Chemical bonds within the eye-lens protein gamma-B crystallin hold the protein together and are therefore important for the function of the protein within the lens. Contrary to previous assumptions, some of these bonds, called disulphide bridges, are already formed simultaneously with the synthesis of the protein in the cell. This is what scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics and the French Institute de Biologie Structurale in Grenoble have discovered. (2021-02-10)

Samara Polytech chemists simplify crystal structures
Samara Polytech scientists have developed new methods of modelling the crystal structure of chemical substances, which makes it possible to obtain additional information about the object under study, unknown in the initial experimental data, and also to find regularities determining its structure and properties. (2021-02-09)

Chemists identified necessary conditions for successful synthesis of small molecules
A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University identified the factors that affect the speed of synthesis of organic molecules consisting of several heterocycles. According to the team, accurate selection of reagents and reaction conditions can help efficiently obtain compounds used in the pharmaceutical industry. (2021-02-09)

Lipid composition of microalgae of the Kaliningrad Region was determined
Scientists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Kemerovo State University determined the qualitative and quantitative composition of fatty acids that the lipids of microalgae comprise. The results are expected to benefit medical science, cosmetology, energy production and the production of feed additives and functional food. (2021-02-09)

Baby vampire bat adopted by mom's best friend
The strong relationship formed between two female adult vampire bats may have motivated one of the bats to adopt the other's baby. (2021-02-09)

NTUsg researchers develop flexible piezoelectric crystal
A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines. (2021-02-08)

Understanding catalytic couplings: not all synergies are simple
Negishi cross-coupling reactions have been widely used to form C-C bonds since the 1970s and are often perceived as the result of two metals (i.e zinc and palladium/nickel) working in synergy. Researchers from the Martin group at ICIQ have delved into the Negishi cross-coupling of aryl esters using nickel catalysis to understand how this reaction works at the molecular level and how to improve it. The results have been published in Nature Catalysis. (2021-02-08)

Mixed and matched: Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation
Polymer matrices can be combined with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to enhance their performance for CO2 separation. However, it is challenging to find compatible interactions between MOFs and polymers for this purpose. Now, an international team of scientists has developed a simple strategy to incorporate zirconium-based MOFs into a polymer matrix via covalent bonds. The resulting membranes show excellent gas separation performance, stability, and tolerance to harsh conditions, helping erode current barriers for industrial applications. (2021-02-08)

Sensor and detoxifier in one
Ozone is a problematic air pollutant that causes serious health problems. A newly developed material not only quickly and selectively indicates the presence of ozone, but also simultaneously renders the gas harmless. As reported by Chinese researchers in Angewandte Chemie, the porous '2-in-one systems' also function reliably in very humid air. (2021-02-05)

A single-molecule guide to understanding chemical reactions better
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report measurement of electrical conductivity of single DNA molecules as a way of monitoring the formation of double-stranded DNA on a gold surface. In their latest paper, they investigate the time evolution of the reaction and report findings not observed previously, demonstrating the suitability of the single-molecule approach in elucidating reaction pathways and exploring novel chemical processes. (2021-02-04)

Molecule from nature provides fully recyclable polymers
Plastics are among the most successful materials of modern times. However, they also create a huge waste problem. Scientists from the University of Groningen and the East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST) in Shanghai produced different polymers from lipoic acid, a natural molecule. These polymers are easily depolymerized under mild conditions. Some 87 percent of the monomers can be recovered in their pure form and re-used to make new polymers of virgin quality. (2021-02-04)

A small protein in bacteria overlooked up to now
Researchers identify an essential factor involved in the ordered recycling of phycobilisome light-harvesting structures (2021-01-29)

Well connected through amides
Linking molecular components through amide bonds is one of the most important reactions in research and the chemical industry. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new type of reaction for making amide bonds. Called an ASHA ligation, this reaction is fast, efficient, works under mild aqueous conditions, and is broadly applicable. (2021-01-27)

A mild way to upcycle plastics used in bottles into fuel and other high-value products
Plastic is ubiquitous in people's lives. Yet, when plastic-containing items have fulfilled their missions, only a small amount is recycled into new products, which are often of lower quality compared to the original material. And, transforming this waste into high-value chemicals requires substantial energy. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' JACS Au have combined a ruthenium-carbon catalyst and mild, lower-energy reaction conditions to convert plastics used in bottles and other packaging into fuels and chemical feedstock. (2021-01-27)

Solar material can 'self-heal' imperfections, new research shows
A material that can be used in technologies such as solar power has been found to self-heal, a new study shows. (2021-01-26)

ACSL1 as a main catalyst of CoA conjugation of propionic acid-class NSAIDs in liver
Researchers from Kanazawa University have found that propionic acid-class nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, form ''conjugates'' with coenzyme A (CoA) by one of the acyl-CoA synthetases, ACSL1, in liver. These conjugates have the covalent binding ability to cellular proteins that may lead to liver injury, a rare severe side effect of NSAID treatment. This knowledge could help pharmaceutical companies to generate pain control options with fewer risks of severe side effects. (2021-01-22)

Cargo delivery by polymers
Degradable, bio-based polymers offer options for chemical recycling, and they can be a tool to store and release useful molecules. Scientists have developed a class of sugar-based polymers that are degradable through acid hydrolysis. The researchers also integrated ''cargo'' molecules in the polymer, which are designed to split off after polymer degradation. Degradable, cargo-bearing polymers are important for medical and sensor applications, says the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-01-22)

Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
Catalysts are getting smaller - ''single-atom'' catalysts are the logical end point of this downsizing. However, individual atoms can no longer be described using the rules developed from larger pieces of metal, so the rules used to predict which metals will be good catalysts must be revamped - this has now been achieved at TU Wien. As it turns out, single atom catalysts based on much cheaper materials might be even more effective. (2021-01-22)

New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles
Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties. (2021-01-22)

Gold nanoparticles more stable by putting rings on them
Hokkaido University scientists have found a way to prevent gold nanoparticles from clumping, which could help towards their use as an anti-cancer therapy. (2021-01-21)

Diamonds need voltage
Diamonds are fascinating - as jewellery but also because of the extreme hardness of the material. How exactly this variant of carbon is formed deep underground and under extremely high pressures and temperatures remains a mystery. Now, researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences Novosibirsk, collaborating with the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, have documented a new influencing factor in theory and experiment. Weak electric fields can be a decisive catalyst for its formation (2021-01-21)

Fans of less successful football clubs are more loyal to one another
Research led by the universities of Kent and Oxford has found that fans of the least successful Premier League football teams have a stronger bond with fellow fans and are more 'fused' with their club than supporters of the most successful teams. (2021-01-21)

Russian chemists developed polymer cathodes for ultrafast batteries
Russian researchers have synthesized and tested new polymer-based cathode materials for lithium dual-ion batteries. The tests showed that the new cathodes withstand up to 25,000 operating cycles and charge in a matter of seconds, thus outperforming lithium-ion batteries. The cathodes can also be used to produce less expensive potassium dual-ion batteries. (2021-01-19)

Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (2021-01-19)

Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women - scientists have found. Researchers discovered a chemical made in the sex glands of the males of one species of tropical butterfly is identical to a chemical produced by flowers to attract butterflies. The study published in PLOS Biology today (19 January 2021) identified a gene for the first time. (2021-01-19)

How cells move and don't get stuck
Theoretical physicists from Berlin teamed up with experimental physicists from Munich to determine the precise mechanics involved in cell motility. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (2021-01-18)

Researchers develop sustainable catalysis process
Acetals are important chemical compounds that are used, for example, in the production of certain medical agents. A new method now makes their synthesis easier and more environmentally friendly. Chemists at the University of Bonn have developed and optimized the sustainable catalytic process. State-of-the-art computer simulations were also used. The reaction is based on a mechanism that frequently occurs in nature, but has rarely been used in chemical synthesis up to now. (2021-01-18)

Modulating helical nanostructures in liquid crystal phase by molecular design
Toyohashi University of Technology has successfully developed sulfur-containing liquid crystal (LC) dimer molecules, which exhibit a helical liquid crystal phase, over a wide temperature range. It is that the ester bond direction in the molecular structures largely impacts the pitch lengths of helical nanostructures in the NTB phase. It is expected that this molecular design can be used to tune the resultant physical properties of LC materials that would contribute to new LC technologies. (2021-01-18)

Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

CU Anschutz scientists reverse deadly impacts of asthma in mice
Excess mucus in the lungs can be fatal for asthma patients, but scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have broken up those secretions at the molecular level and reversed their often deadly impacts. (2021-01-13)

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