Current Chemical Engineer News and Events

Current Chemical Engineer News and Events, Chemical Engineer News Articles.
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Graphene Oxide membranes could reduce paper industry energy costs
Paper industry wastewater recycling is among the most energy-intensive chemical processes in the world. Georgia Tech researchers have found a method to engineer membranes made from graphene oxide that allow water to get through it much faster than through conventional membranes and, in the process, can save the paper industry more than 30% in energy costs of water separation. (2021-02-22)

New technology enables predictive design of engineered human cells
Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a design-driven process to build complex genetic circuits for cellular engineering. The new technology utilizes computational modeling to more efficiently identify useful genetic designs before building them in the lab. Faced with myriad possibilities, modeling points researchers to designs that offer real opportunity. The researchers constructed a variety of genetic programs to carry out desired and useful functions in human cells and found the programs worked as predicted. And the designs worked the first time. (2021-02-19)

Giving oxygen to the question of air quality
Volatile alkanes can rapidly acquire oxygen atoms in a free radical chain reaction, a process significant for fuel combustion and air pollution. (2021-02-18)

Salk team reveals never-before-seen antibody binding, informing liver cancer, antibody design
In structural biology, some molecules are so unusual they can only be captured with a unique set of tools. That's precisely how a team led by Salk scientists defined how antibodies can recognize a compound called phosphohistidine--a highly unstable molecule that has been found to play a central role in some forms of cancer. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on February 5. (2021-02-17)

The water surface is a fantastic place for chemical reactions
Using an advanced technique, scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have demonstrated that a chemical reaction powered by light takes place ten thousand times faster at the air-water interface--what we usually call the water surface--than in the bulk of the water, even when the light has equivalent energy. This finding could help our understanding of the many important chemical and biological processes that take place at the water surface. (2021-02-15)

A single-molecule guide to understanding chemical reactions better
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report measurement of electrical conductivity of single DNA molecules as a way of monitoring the formation of double-stranded DNA on a gold surface. In their latest paper, they investigate the time evolution of the reaction and report findings not observed previously, demonstrating the suitability of the single-molecule approach in elucidating reaction pathways and exploring novel chemical processes. (2021-02-04)

Toward safer steroids: Scientists devise method for improving safety of drug used to treat COVID-19, autoimmune disorders and more
Scripps Research scientists bring together multiple technologies to engineer potentially safer glucocorticoids, drugs used to treat COVID-19 and other conditions. (2021-02-02)

Solar material can 'self-heal' imperfections, new research shows
A material that can be used in technologies such as solar power has been found to self-heal, a new study shows. (2021-01-26)

Continuous monitoring of proteins a game-changer for patients with deteriorating health
A world-first discovery by Australian researchers could become a game-changer for patients at risk of rapid health deterioration, such as heart complications, stroke, sepsis and cancer. Researchers developed an antibody as a biosensor, to continuously monitor rapid changes in the concentration of EGFR, a protein present on cancer cells and in body fluids. (2021-01-25)

Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (2021-01-19)

Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women - scientists have found. Researchers discovered a chemical made in the sex glands of the males of one species of tropical butterfly is identical to a chemical produced by flowers to attract butterflies. The study published in PLOS Biology today (19 January 2021) identified a gene for the first time. (2021-01-19)

New tool removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems
'What goes in, must come out' is a familiar refrain. It is especially pertinent to the challenges facing UBC researchers who are investigating methods to remove chemicals and pharmaceuticals from public water systems. Cleaning products, organic dyes and pharmaceuticals are finding their ways into water bodies with wide-ranging negative implications to health and the environment, explains Dr. Mohammad Arjmand, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at UBC Okanagan. (2021-01-18)

Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times
In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows--transparency and conductivity. (2021-01-15)

Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
A new computational technique that uses heat map data to reverse engineer highly detailed models of chromosomes and researchers have uncovered new information about the close spatial relationships that chromatin folding creates between genes. (2021-01-14)

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. The Department of Energy is determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and through the work of two UCF researchers, the DOE is one step closer to that goal. (2021-01-12)

Fluoride to the rescue?
Scientists have long been aware of the dangerous overuse of antibiotics and the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant microbes that have resulted. While over-prescription of antibiotics for medicinal use has unsettling implications for human health, so too does the increasing presence of antibiotics in the natural environment. The latter may stem from the improper disposal of medicines, but also from the biotechnology field, which has depended on antibiotics as a selection device in the lab. (2021-01-04)

Eavesdropping on the pH levels inside the brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed the first all-in-one miniature pH probe for real-time investigations of intrinsic extracellular pH dynamics in the deep brain structures. (2020-12-23)

Invasive in the U.S., lifesaver Down Under
New research reveals monitor lizards should be regarded as ''ecosystem engineers'' as they provide food and shelter to other reptiles, insects and mammals, helping prevent extinction. (2020-12-21)

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha. (2020-12-17)

Carbon capture's next top model
Creating accurate, detailed models is key to scaling up carbon capture technology. A recent paper led by the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering examines and compares the various modeling approaches for hollow fiber membrane contactors (HFMCs), a type of carbon capture technology. The group analyzed over 150 cited studies of multiple modeling approaches to help researchers choose the technique best suited to their research. (2020-12-16)

NYUAD researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenomenon. (2020-12-10)

Artificial Chemist 2.0: quantum dot R&D in less than an hour
A new technology, called Artificial Chemist 2.0, allows users to go from requesting a custom quantum dot to completing the relevant R&D and beginning manufacturing in less than an hour. The tech is completely autonomous, and uses artificial intelligence and automated robotic systems to perform multi-step chemical synthesis and analysis. (2020-12-10)

Using light, red blood cells and a honey bee peptide to deliver therapeutic proteins
Protein therapies are often more potent and selective toward their biochemical targets than other types of drugs, particularly small molecules. However, proteins are also more likely to be quickly degraded by enzymes or cleared from blood by the kidneys, which has limited their clinical use. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have engineered red blood cell (RBC) carriers that release therapeutic proteins when stimulated by light, with the help of a honey bee peptide. (2020-12-09)

Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Princeton University researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases. (2020-11-30)

New procedure will reduce the need for rare metals in chemical synthesis
Researchers from Kanazawa University performed an important type of tertiary alkylative cross-coupling reaction without using a rare-metal catalyst. Such efforts are needed to improve the long-term sustainability of important chemical syntheses and minimize supply chain disruptions caused by pandemics and other crises. (2020-11-27)

Tackling metabolic complexity
CRISPRi screens reveal sources of metabolic robustness in E. coli. (2020-11-24)

Lab closed? Head to the kitchen
Studies explore fluids in pancakes, beer, and the kitchen sink. (2020-11-23)

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

Green chemistry: Politecnico di Milano publishes in Chem
The prestigious journal Chem (Cell Press, impact factor: 19.735) publishes the first mechanosynthesis of a molecular crystal with a Borromean topology. The results obtained by the Politecnico di Milano group have shown that mechanosynthesis can be applied to the self-assembly of complex multi-component supramolecular structures such as the Borromean rings, demonstrating, in detail, the mechanism of formation of this complex topology. (2020-11-18)

New protein imaging method paves way for next generation biomaterials and tissue analysis
Scientists have established a new method to image proteins that could lead to new discoveries in disease through biological tissue and cell analysis and the development of new biomaterials that can be used for the next generation of drug delivery systems and medical devices. (2020-11-17)

Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material
Electrochemical oxygen evolution on Hf2B2Ir5 electrode material. (2020-11-11)

Folding proteins feel the heat, and cold
A new study shows proteins that presumably evolved to avoid water as they fold may actually behave in ways scientists did not anticipate. (2020-11-11)

Russian scientists created a chemical space mapping method and cracked the mystery of Mendeleev number
Scientists from Skoltech puzzled out the physical meaning of the mysterious Mendeleev Numbers and suggested calculating them based on the fundamental properties of atoms. They showed that both MNs and the chemical space built around them were more effective than empirical solutions proposed until then. (2020-11-10)

UMass Amherst research compares sensitivity of all genes to chemical exposure
A University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental health scientist has used an unprecedented objective approach to identify which molecular mechanisms in mammals are the most sensitive to chemical exposures. (2020-10-29)

Why is fertilizer used in explosives? (video)
Over the last century, the compound ammonium nitrate has been involved in at least 30 disasters and terrorist attacks. Under normal circumstances, it's totally harmless and used in things like fertilizer, so what makes ammonium nitrate turn deadly?: https://youtu.be/-SeT3N3A19c. (2020-10-22)

New method for upcycling polyethylene creates value from plastic waste
Using a unique catalyst to molecularly deconstruct polyethylene, the most commonly used form of plastic, researchers present a solvent-free way to transform it into higher-value, widely used chemical compounds. (2020-10-22)

LiU researchers first to develop an organic battery
Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have for the first time demonstrated an organic battery. It is of a type known as a 'redox flow battery', with a large capacity that can be used to store energy from wind turbines and solar cells, and as a power bank for cars. An article now published in Advanced Functional Materials. (2020-10-15)

What tiny surfing robots teach us about surface tension
Propelled by chemical changes in surface tension, microrobots surfing across fluid interfaces lead researchers to new ideas. (2020-10-09)

Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Researchers have uncovered details of how a certain type of bacteria breaks down cellulose--a finding that could help reduce the cost and environmental impact of the use of biomass, including biofuel production. The bacteria's cellulose degradation system is in some way different from how a fungus is already widely used in industry, including to soften up denim to make stone-washed jeans. (2020-10-08)

NREL, UK university partner to dive deeper into how enzymes digest plastic
A collaboration between scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom, and other partners has yielded further insight into the workings of plastic-eating enzymes. (2020-10-06)

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