Current Chemical Reaction News and Events | Page 24

Current Chemical Reaction News and Events, Chemical Reaction News Articles.
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Sea fireflies
Evolution is a rich and dynamic process. Species respond to pressures in a variety of ways, most of which reduce to finding food, avoiding becoming someone else's food and attracting a mate. To solve that last one the animal kingdom is replete with fantastic, bizarre and mesmerizing adaptions. The bioluminescent courtship displays of ostracods may encapsulate all three. (2019-01-30)

Succeeded in finding intermediates synthesized in oxidation
Korean researchers have discovered new active intermediates in high-efficient oxidation using biomimetic manganese enzyme and artificial oxidants (2019-01-30)

NTU and SUTD researchers discover asymmetric chemical reaction with intriguing reaction pathways
Singaporean research teams from NTU and SUTD have developed an asymmetric catalytic reaction, which provides access to synthetically challenging molecular structures and features an unusual reaction pathway. (2019-01-28)

Mimicking nature for programmable and adaptive synthetic materials
In a recently published work in Nature Communications on Jan 25, 2019, scientists from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Science and Research (JNCASR) and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine (inStem) have successfully created a minimalistic synthetic mimic of aforementioned cytoskeletal networks with structural and temporal programming. (2019-01-28)

The energy implications of organic radical polymers
Texas A&M University professor Dr. Jodie L. Lutkenhaus is one step closer to realizing her goal of creating a battery made entirely of polymers, which has the potential to charge and discharge much faster than traditional batteries. Lutkenhaus, an associate professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, has detailed her most recent findings on these polymers in a paper in Nature Materials. (2019-01-28)

A powerful catalyst for electrolysis of water that could help harness renewable energy
An international collaboration of Scientists at Dongguk University developed a novel nickel-based hydroxide compound that can be used as a powerful catalyst for the electrolysis of water. This material could also be useful for developing renewable energy sources. (2019-01-25)

Silicones obtained at low temperatures with the help of air
Russian scientists have developed a new method for synthesizing para-carboxyplenylsiloxanes, a unique class of organosilicon compounds. The resulting compounds are promising for creating self-healing, electrically conductive, heat- and frost-resistant silicones. (2019-01-24)

NUS engineers develop novel strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles for wide-ranging applications
NUS Engineers have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles known as transition metal dichalcogenide quantum dots (TMD QDs) which can potentially generate cancer-killing properties. The team is also looking to optimise TMD QDs for applications such as the next generation TV and electronic device screens, advanced electronics components and even solar cells. (2019-01-24)

Scientists identify toxic antipredator defense mechanism in locusts
A team of scientists led by Prof. KANG Le at the Institute of Zoology reported an unprecedented animal defense mechanism by which an olfactory aposematic (warning) signal can be converted to a hypertoxic chemical to facilitate an antipredator defense in locusts. (2019-01-24)

Chemists develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines
A team of chemists at the University of Münster led by Professor Frank Glorius have developed a new, simple synthetic method for producing fluorinated piperidines -- which had previously been very difficult. These compounds play a major role in the development of new active ingredients. The results have just been published in the online edition of the journal Nature Chemistry. (2019-01-22)

The first nucleophilic gold complex
A collaborative research effort between the departments of chemistry at the University of Oxford and University of Jyväskylä has resulted in the discovery of a gold compound exhibiting nucleophilic behavior hitherto unknown for molecular gold. The research enables new opportunities in applying gold compounds, for example, as catalysts in novel chemical reactions. (2019-01-21)

Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has introduced a system that turn carbon emissions into usable energy. (2019-01-19)

Researchers find new ways to harness wasted methane
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) presented new ways to harness wasted methane. (2019-01-18)

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook
Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale. His work, undertaken with colleagues including a Nobel Prize-winner, has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2019-01-17)

Queen's University researchers develop new test to detect disease and infection
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives. (2019-01-17)

Models of life
Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins. (2019-01-17)

The limonene myth (video)
Limonene, a compound found in citrus fruits, has two enantiomers: mirror-image molecules that cannot be superimposed, like a left and right hand. There is a persistent myth that one of these mirror molecules is responsible for the smell of oranges, while the other lends its odor to lemons. In this video, Reactions explains that smell chemistry is never that simple: https://youtu.be/W9JpRg8M1qk. (2019-01-17)

Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but a Vanderbilt University engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing. (2019-01-17)

Just like flipping a switch -- in only half a picosecond
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is -- watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster. (2019-01-16)

Power stations driven by light
The smallest building blocks within the power stations of organisms which get their energy directly from the sun are basically miniature reactors surrounded by collectors which capture photons and forward them to the center. The close correlation between structure and interaction of the components boosts productivity, a strategy which an international team of researchers, including scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, is using for increasing the efficiency of solar technology. (2019-01-15)

Intestinal bacteria from healthy infants prevent food allergy
New research from the University of Chicago shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies. (2019-01-14)

Discovery of single atom structure leads to more efficient catalyst
The discovery shows an efficiency rate that is up to 25 times higher than traditional catalysts made from larger iridium structures or nanoparticles. (2019-01-14)

Marine bacterium sheds light on control of toxic metals
An ocean-dwelling bacterium has provided fresh insights into how cells protect themselves from the toxic effects of metal ions such as iron and copper. Although essential to life, metal ions can also generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) -- highly reactive molecules that damage cells as they try to form bonds with other molecules. In humans, reactive oxygen species are linked to ageing and also to diseases such as cancers. (2019-01-14)

L-proline catalyzed synthesis
Here, we report a simple and efficient method for the synthesis of different unsymmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and N-substituted urea derivatives using L-Proline as a green catalyst. The methodology is applicable for synthesizing various derivatives of phenylurea, diphenyl urea with excellent yield at mild condition (2019-01-12)

3D printing 100 times faster with light
Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes, University of Michigan researchers have shown. (2019-01-11)

How compostable plastic works (video)
Due to the demands of eco-conscious consumers, manufacturers are making more and more disposable plastic products from compostable polylactic acid. However, there are a few things everyone should know before tossing these plastics in the compost bin. In this video, Reactions explains how polylactic acid becomes compost. (2019-01-10)

Discovery adapts natural membrane to make hydrogen fuel from water
In a recent study from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have combined two membrane-bound protein complexes to perform a complete conversion of water molecules to hydrogen and oxygen. (2019-01-10)

New synthesis strategy for chiral drugs -- versatile chiral chemical species from aldehydes
We developed a new method of asymmetric synthesis for versatile chiral chemicals from aldehydes. A chiral hydroxycarbanion was formed from an aldehyde using a chiral copper?N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst and a palladium catalyst, which enabled subsequent synthetic processes to take place in one flask while maintaining enantioselectivity. Since many drugs exhibit chirality-dependent effectiveness, our new method should facilitate synthesis and development of pharmaceuticals and their precursors. (2019-01-09)

Lab safety, 10 years later
On Dec. 29, 2008, staff scientist Sheri Sangji was working on a chemical synthesis in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, when one of the reagents ignited. Sangji's clothes caught fire, causing injuries that led to her death on Jan. 16, 2009, at age 23. Now, a decade later, chemists discuss ongoing efforts to improve academic lab safety in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-01-09)

Liverpool scientists design new responsive porous material inspired by proteins
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have, for the first time, synthesized a new material that exhibits structural change and triggered chemical activity like a protein. (2019-01-09)

Scientists provide new insight on how gene expression is controlled
Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanism underlying the control of gene expression in all living organisms, according to a study published today in eLife. (2019-01-08)

New catalysts for better fuel cells
Researchers in Korea have fabricated nano-sized catalysts that could improve the performance and production of clean energy fuel cells. (2019-01-08)

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation
High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline structures in the metal cobalt. The technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew from clusters including tens of atoms to crystals as large as five nanometers. (2019-01-07)

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload
Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety valve,' to prevent overload when their metabolic operation reaches a critical level. The implications of this new theory, published in Nature Metabolism on Jan. 7, could be far-reaching, as it also explains why cancer cells waste energy by producing lactate. (2019-01-07)

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with 'nanowrappers'
Scientists made hollow nanosized boxes with corner holes, demonstrating how these ''nanowrappers'' can carry and release DNA-coated nanoparticles. (2019-01-03)

How baby aspirin saves lives (video)
Low-dose 'baby' aspirin is rarely given to children anymore. Instead, people at risk of a heart attack may take a daily aspirin to decrease their risk. In this video, Reactions explains how low-dose aspirin works to inhibit blood clotting and help prevent heart attacks. (2019-01-03)

Quantum chemistry on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers to predict complex chemical reactions without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for chemistry, for the first time. (2019-01-02)

A catalytic flying carpet
Pitt researchers for the first time apply catalytic chemical reactions to 2D sheets to generate flows that transform these sheets into mobile, 3D objects. (2019-01-02)

China's war on particulate air pollution is causing more severe ozone pollution
In China, the rapid reduction of the pollutant PM 2.5 dramatically altered the chemistry of the atmosphere, leading to an increase in harmful ground-level ozone pollution, especially in large cities. (2019-01-02)

See invisible into HER catalysis
Chinese scientists makes a big step forward in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water electrolysis! They put forward a powerful solution by revealing the secrets of catalytic processes via synchrotron radiation, the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) announced on Jan 1st, 2019. (2019-01-02)

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