Current Chemistry News and Events

Current Chemistry News and Events, Chemistry News Articles.
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Teamwork in a molecule
Chemists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have demonstrated the value of 'teamwork' by successfully harnessing the interaction between two gallium atoms in a novel compound to split the particularly strong bond between fluorine and carbon. The gallium compound is also cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional alternatives. (2021-01-21)

Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Chemical Education introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elements much more approachable -- by using ''pseudo'' periodic tables filled with superheroes, foods and apps. (2021-01-13)

Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes
New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes. (2021-01-13)

Study pinpoints hurdles faced by women and minorities in U.S. chemistry departments
Insufficient interactions with academic advisors and peers and financial problems are derailing career aspirations of women and minority groups pursing graduate degrees in the nation's highest-funded chemistry programs, according to a newly published study. (2021-01-11)

The biggest chemistry stories of 2020
2020 was an eventful year, with science at the front and center of most news cycles. As this seemingly long year wraps up, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the biggest chemistry stories, top research trends and predictions for the coming year. (2021-01-06)

Sweat, bleach and gym air quality
One sweaty, huffing, exercising person emits as many chemicals from their body as up to five sedentary people, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study. And notably, those human emissions, including amino acids from sweat or acetone from breath, chemically combine with bleach cleaners to form new airborne chemicals with unknown impacts to indoor air quality. (2021-01-05)

Innovative battery chemistry revolutionizes zinc-air battery
The zinc-air battery is an attractive energy storage technology of the future. Based on an innovative, non-alkaline, aqueous electrolyte, an international research team led by scientist Dr. Wei Sun of MEET Battery Research Center at the University of Muenster has developed a new battery chemistry for the zinc-air battery which overcomes the previous technical obstacles. (2021-01-04)

Eavesdropping on the pH levels inside the brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed the first all-in-one miniature pH probe for real-time investigations of intrinsic extracellular pH dynamics in the deep brain structures. (2020-12-23)

Will it kombucha? (video)
Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade -- but what is it exactly? This week, the Reactions team breaks down kombucha's chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha. (2020-12-17)

Scientists discover a new complex europium hydride
A team of researchers from Russia, the United States, and China led by Skoltech Professor Artem R. Oganov has discovered an unexpected very complex europium hydride, Eu8H46. Although devoid of superconductivity, europium hydrides are very interesting in view of chemical anomalies that make europium different from other rare-earth atoms. (2020-12-15)

Chemists from RUDN University used crab shells to improve palladium catalysts
?hemists from RUDN University synthesized soluble biopolymers based on chitin from crab shells. Together with palladium, they form effective catalysts for organic reactions, and their nanoparticles can be re-used over ten times. (2020-12-14)

Observing the ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons
Photo-induced electron transfer is central to numerous physical processes, for instance in the magnetization of materials. The quest to understand and control this ultrafast process has long been pursued in vain, with no answer to the question of whether electrons induce atomic motion, or vice versa. To answer this question, the atomic equivalent of the paradox of the chicken and the egg, a consortium of scientists used an X-ray laser (X-FEL) located in Stanford. (2020-12-07)

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (2020-12-07)

Protein molecules in cells function as miniature antennas
Researchers led by Josef Lazar from IOCB Prague have demonstrated that molecules of fluorescent proteins act as antennas with optical properties (i.e. the ability to absorb and emit light) dependent on their spatial orientation. First discovered in jellyfish, fluorescent proteins are nowadays widely used in studies of molecular processes in living cells and organisms. The newly described properties of these molecules will find applications in basic biological research as well as in novel drug discovery. (2020-12-02)

Breaking the rules of chemistry unlocks new reaction
Scientists have broken the rules of enzyme engineering to unlock a new method for creating chemical reactions that could unlock a wide range of new applications -- from creating new drugs to food production. (2020-12-01)

Pesticide deadly to bees now easily detected in honey
A common insecticide that is a major hazard for honeybees is now effectively detected in honey thanks to a simple new method. (2020-11-24)

Biofriendly protocells pump up blood vessels
In a new study published today in Nature Chemistry, Professor Stephen Mann and Dr Mei Li from Bristol's School of Chemistry, together with Associate Professor Jianbo Liu and colleagues at Hunan University and Central South University in China, prepared synthetic protocells coated in red blood cell fragments for use as nitric oxide generating bio-bots within blood vessels. (2020-11-20)

Insights on a mechanism to stop COVID-19 replication
Stopping the replication of SARS-CoV-2 is likely possible thanks to a compound called EBSELEN: a group of researchers from the Politecnico di Milano has communicated aspects relevant to the blocking of replication mechanism in the New Journal of Chemistry. (2020-11-19)

Green chemistry: Politecnico di Milano publishes in Chem
The prestigious journal Chem (Cell Press, impact factor: 19.735) publishes the first mechanosynthesis of a molecular crystal with a Borromean topology. The results obtained by the Politecnico di Milano group have shown that mechanosynthesis can be applied to the self-assembly of complex multi-component supramolecular structures such as the Borromean rings, demonstrating, in detail, the mechanism of formation of this complex topology. (2020-11-18)

Cysteine synthesis was a key step in the origin of life
All proteins are built from the same 20 amino acids. One of these, cysteine, was assumed not to have been present at the origin of life. In a new study, published in Science, UCL scientists have recreated how cysteine was formed at the origins of life. Additionally, they have observed how, once formed, cysteine catalyses the fusion of peptides in water - a fundamental step in the path towards protein enzymes. (2020-11-12)

Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Magnets are to be found everywhere in our daily lives, whether in satellites, telephones or on fridge doors. However, they are made up of heavy inorganic materials whose component elements are, in some cases, of limited availability. Now, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Bordeaux and the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble) have developed a new lightweight molecule-based magnet, produced at low temperatures, and exhibiting unprecedented magnetic properties. (2020-10-29)

TalTech chemists' new method is a significant step towards greener pharmaceutical industry
The rapid changes in the chemical industry are connected one hand with the depletion of natural resources and deepening of environmental concerns, on the other hand with the growth of environmental awareness. Green, environmentally friendly chemistry is playing an increasingly important role in the sustainable chemical industry. (2020-10-27)

Sludge-powered bacteria generate more electricity, faster
A new electroactive bacterium could help fuel wastewater treatment reactors. (2020-10-19)

Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture
EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new way to manufacture zeolitic membranes, state-of-the-art materials used for gas separation in harsh conditions. (2020-10-05)

The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
Researchers at Osaka City University produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron. This solves a problem with current artificial photosynthesis technology of only producing molecules with 1 carbon atom and paves the way to exploring the use of CO2 as a raw material. (2020-09-28)

On the road to conductors of the future
Superconducting wires can transport electricity without loss. This would allow for less power production, reducing both costs and greenhouse gasses. Unfortunately, extensive cooling stands in the way, because existing superconductors only lose their resistance at extremely low temperatures. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientist have now introduced new findings about hydrogen sulfide in the H(3)S form, and its deuterium analogue D(3)S, which become superconducting at the relatively high temperatures of -77 and -107 ┬░C, respectively. (2020-09-14)

Hydrogen vehicles might soon become the global norm
Roughly one billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways. Only a few run on hydrogen. This could change after a breakthrough achieved by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The breakthrough? A new catalyst that can be used to produce cheaper and far more sustainable hydrogen powered vehicles. (2020-08-24)

Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game
To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring -- a change likely to continue for many this fall. As a result, hands-on chemistry labs are no longer accessible to undergraduate students. In a new study in the Journal of Chemical Education, researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in which teams solve chemistry problems to progress and 'escape.' (2020-08-12)

Bouncing, sticking, exploding viruses: Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2
Better understanding of the surface chemistry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is needed to reduce transmission and accelerate vaccine design. (2020-08-11)

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
University of Pittsburgh Associate Professor John A. Keith is using new quantum chemistry computing procedures to categorize hypothetical electrocatalysts that are ''too slow'' or ''too expensive'', far more thoroughly and quickly than was considered possible a few years ago. (2020-08-05)

New material can generate hydrogen from salt and polluted water
Developed a new 2D material to produce hydrogen, which is the basis of alternative energy. The material efficiently generates hydrogen molecules from fresh, salt, and polluted water by exposure to sunlight (2020-07-21)

Florida harmful algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health
In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time red tides were gathering along the Florida west coast, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins. (2020-07-20)

FSU news: Scientists discover heavy element chemistry can change at high pressures
An international team of researchers has demonstrated how curium -- element 96 in the periodic table and one of the last that can be seen with the naked eye -- responds to the application of high pressure created by squeezing a sample between two diamonds. (2020-07-15)

Cyanobacteria from Lake Chad analyzed for toxins
Analysis of dried cyanobacterial cakes from Lake Chad show that they are rich in needed amino acids, but some exceed WHO standards for microcystin, a potent liver toxin. Cyanobacteria can supplement the diets of undernourished villagers, but periodic monitoring of toxins is needed. (2020-07-14)

Graphene: It is all about the toppings
The way graphene interacts with other materials depends on how these materials are brought into contact with the graphene. The appropriate atoms are brought into contact with the graphene in such a way that they 'grow' on the graphene in the desired crystal structure. Until now the mechanisms of the 'growth' of such other materials on graphene have often remained unclear. A new study shows now how indium oxide grows on graphene. (2020-07-08)

Material research: New chemistry for ultra-thin gas sensors
The application of zinc oxide layers in industry is manifold and ranges from the protection of degradable goods to the detection of toxic nitrogen oxide gas. Such layers can be deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) which employs typically chemical compounds, or simply precursors, which ignite immediately upon contact with air, i.e. are highly pyrophoric. An interdisciplinary research team at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) has now established a new fabrication process based on a non-pyrophoric zinc precursor t (2020-07-01)

Electrochemical reaction powers new drug discoveries
A Cornell-led collaboration is flipping the switch on traditional synthetic chemistry by using electricity to drive a new chemical reaction that previously stumped chemists who rely on conventional methods. (2020-06-30)

A new view of microscopic interactions
When two cars collide at an intersection -- from opposite directions -- the impact is much different than when two cars -- traveling in the same direction -- 'bump' into each other. In the laboratory, similar types of collisions can be made to occur between molecules to study chemistry at very low temperatures, or 'cold collisions.' A team of scientists led by Arthur Suits at the University of Missouri has developed a new experimental approach to study chemistry using these cold 'same direction' molecular collisions. (2020-06-30)

Wrapping up hydrophobic hydration
Studied in detail, the embedding of hydrophobic molecules in water looks quite different than previously assumed. (2020-06-29)

Scientists propose strategy for site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems
Prof. QU Xiaogang from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his colleagues recently presented a novel strategy using a neutrophil-directed ATH reaction to achieve site-selective chiral drug synthesis in living systems. (2020-06-26)

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