Current Chemokines News and Events

Current Chemokines News and Events, Chemokines News Articles.
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New synthetic peptides could attenuate atherosclerosis
Atherosclerosis, a lipid-triggered chronic inflammatory disease of our arteries, is the main cause of strokes and heart attacks. An international team of researchers led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the LMU University Hospital has developed novel synthetic peptides that can help to prevent atherosclerosis in vitro, that is in the test tube, as well as in animal models. (2021-02-12)

Antitumoral effects of LXR activation
Tumor cells are able to avoid the attack of the immune system through several mechanisms. For instance, these can secrete factors that turn macrophages -cells in the immune system- into dual action agents that contribute to the tumor progress and will protect it from immune body defences: these become, thus, the tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). (2021-02-12)

Cancer metastasis: From problem to opportunity
When cancer metastasizes, it often ends up in the lungs, where the new tumors unleash a cascade of chemical cues that thwart the body's immune response. A team of researchers from the Wyss Institute has created a new approach that attacks metastasis itself by using red blood cells as couriers to deliver nanoparticles filled with immune-cell-attracting chemicals. This approach halted lung tumor growth in mice with metastatic breast cancer and protected the animals against future cancer recurrences.  (2020-11-16)

COVID-19 survival among elderly patients could be improved by arthritis drug
A type of arthritis drug may reduce the risk of dying for elderly patients with COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Scientists synthesize anti-inflammatory tick spit protein for first time
In a world first, scientists at the University of Sydney have synthesised evasin proteins found in tick saliva, which offer a promising pathway for anti-inflammatory medicine. (2020-05-26)

Nasal biomarkers predict severity of pollen-specific allergy symptoms
It is not only people with allergies, but also a subgroup of people without one that suffer in spring and have nasal problems from contact with pollen. A new study shows that biomarkers in the nose can predict the severity of the symptoms that will occur in spring even before the pollen season starts. (2020-04-29)

Nutrient deficiency in tumor cells attracts cells that suppress the immune system
A study led by IDIBELL researchers and published this week in the American journal PNAS shows that, by depriving tumor cells of glucose, they release a large number of signaling molecules. The signaling cascade produced by the lack of nutrients induces tumor inflammation, a determining factor for the evolution of the disease. (2020-04-21)

High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' -- an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death -- by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study. (2020-04-15)

Studies of membrane vesicles pave the way to innovative treatments of degenerative diseases
Membrane vesicles can become a new therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine and a new class of effective and safe medications. (2020-01-15)

Microcapsules for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells
A team of scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University together with their colleagues developed a method of targeted drug delivery to cancer cells. The discovery is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells and microcapsules made of polymeric compounds. The results were published in the Biomaterials Science journal. In the future the discovery may secure more precise treatment of tumors without causing damage to healthy tissues. (2019-12-09)

New bone healing mechanism has potential therapeutic applications
A new mechanism that contributes to adult bone maintenance and repair opens the possibility of developing therapeutic strategies for improving bone healing. (2019-12-09)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant...
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. Comparing NSCLC PE and published plasma levels of CAR-T recipients, both were dominated by sIL-6R and IL-6 but NSCLC PE had more VEGF, FGF2 and TNF, and less IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, IL-15, MIP1 and IFN. (2019-11-22)

Revealed a mechanism of beta-cells involved in the development of type-1 diabetes
Researchers reveal how beta cells in the pancreas respond to an inflammatory environment and how this response is implicated in the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. (2019-11-06)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Texas Biomed researchers pinpoint why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis
Tuberculosis and HIV -- two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases -- are far worse when they occur together. Now, Texas Biomedical Research Institute researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk. The results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a top-tier venue for critical advances in biomedical research. (2019-09-12)

Molecular chatter makes for a 'hot tumor'
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has deciphered a complex molecular conversation between cancer and immune cells that is key to orchestrating the successful invasion of tumors by T cells that kill cancer cells. (2019-06-10)

COMMD3/8 protein complex: a potential drug target for treating inflammatory diseases
A team of researchers led by Kazuhiro Suzuki from the Immunology Frontier Research Center at Osaka University discovered the COMMD3/8 complex as a molecule involved in immune cell migration, clarifying that the complex plays a critical role in the establishment of immune responses. Their research results were published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. (2019-05-30)

New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections
In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King's College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2019-05-17)

Different bacteria use same cell surface molecule to invade tissue and promote infection
A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings, published March 19 in the journal mBio, suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock syndrome. (2019-03-19)

The sneaky way estrogen drives brain metastasis in non-estrogen-dependent breast cancers
University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that while estrogen doesn't directly affect triple-negative breast cancer cells, it can affect surrounding brain cells in ways that promote cancer cell migration and invasiveness (2019-03-01)

Scientists discover how neuroactive steroids dampen inflammatory signaling in cells
For the first time, scientists discovered how neuroactive steroids naturally found in the brain and bloodstream inhibit the activity of a specific kind of protein called Toll-like receptors (TLR4), which have been known to play a role in inflammation in many organs, including the brain. (2019-02-13)

Combatting brain infections in special issue of Viral Immunology
A special issue of Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, contains a rich collection of the latest research and reviews focusing on Viral Neuroimmunology and the intricacies of viral brain infection. (2019-01-16)

Live probiotics can re-balance the gut microbiome and modify immune system response
New research published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutics demonstrates that 'good' bacteria in the live probiotic SymproveTM can successfully reach and colonise the gut, where they go on to change the existing gut flora. They are also capable of modifying immune response. (2018-11-20)

Patchy distribution of joint inflammation resolved
Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylo-arthritis (SpA) are chronic disabling diseases that have a poor outcome on loco-motoric function, if left untreated. RA en SpA affect each about 1 percent of the population. The reason why certain joints are more affected than others has been a longstanding question, resolved by Isabelle Cambré and Prof. Dirk Elewaut from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research who published their results in Nature Communications (2018-11-15)

Prenatal exposure to malaria may determine disease susceptibility early in life
Prenatal exposure to malaria considerably alters the newborn's innate immune response (i.e. its first line of defence), particularly when the placenta has been infected, according to a study led by ISGlobal, the Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) and the Institute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp (ITM). The results, published in BMC Medicine, could help explain why some babies are more susceptible to malaria than others during their first year of life. (2018-11-01)

The irresistible CCL17
The chemotactic protein CCL17 attracts immune cells to where they are currently needed. Doctors have long known: A high level of this substance in the body indicates an allergic reaction. A team of scientists led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a completely new function: CCL17 also influences signal transmission in the brain. There may even be a molecular link to autism. The results have now been published in the journal Glia. (2018-09-13)

Stress linked to more advanced disease in some leukemia patients
Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who feel more stress also have more cancer cells in their blood and elevated levels of three other markers of more advanced disease. (2018-09-11)

New biomarkers of inflammation identified as risk of polyneuropathy
Polyneuropathy is one of the most common complications in people with diabetes. First symptoms are often pins-and-needles sensations in the feet. Although polyneuropathy is present in about 30 percent of people with diabetes, it often remains undiagnosed. Scientists from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have now been able to show for the first time that six biomarkers of inflammation indicate the risk of polyneuropathy. (2018-08-23)

Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity
Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can lead to congestive heart failure. Researchers have found an important contributor to that heart pathology -- disruption of the metabolism that controls immune responses in the spleen and heart. This dysregulated immunometabolism impairs resolution of inflammation, and chronic, non-resolving inflammation leads to advanced heart failure. (2018-08-06)

Study describes enzyme's key role in immune response to Chagas disease parasite
A study shows that the expression of PI3Kγ protein increases during infection by T. cruzi, an essential response in avoiding excessive inflammation and controlling parasitemia. Heart tissue analyses involving human patients who developed cardiopathy in the disease's chronic stage also provided results. The next challenge is to devise treatment for Chagas using molecules capable of modulating the cellular signaling pathway mediated by PI3Kγ. (2018-07-13)

A study points to new therapeutic targets for tumors associated with chronic inflammation
Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets. The study has been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. (2018-07-11)

Revving up innate control of viral infection requires a three-cell ignition
The innate NK-cell response requires a rather carefully choreographed interaction of three cell types. (2018-07-05)

New study provides insight into blood signatures of inflammation
A new study from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health (BUSPH) identifies a pattern of inflammation associated with cardio-metabolic risks among participants in the Black Women's Health Study, as well as two independent groups of vulnerable women. These findings could help underserved patients benefit from precision medicine and personalized profiles of disease risk. (2018-05-08)

How tumors caused by STD quickly regress in dogs
The canine transmissible venereal tumor is a contagious cancer that has spread by mating among dogs worldwide. One unique feature of this cancer is that, for unclear reasons, it regresses spontaneously or a few weeks after a single treatment of radiotherapy or chemotherapy. A study published April 9 in the journal Cancer Cell shines a light on this mystery, revealing a key role for the immune system in triggering fast cancer rejection in chemotherapy-treated dogs. (2018-04-09)

Protein derived from parasite has potential to alleviate debilitating disease
A Children's-led research team has turned the tables on Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic worm that freeloads in humans, by using a protein derived from the parasite as a therapeutic molecule to reduce bleeding and pain associated with chemotherapy-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. (2018-04-03)

Immune cell target that may prevent or delay heart failure after pressure overload
Researchers have identified a therapeutic target to prevent or delay heart failure from pressure overload of the heart, and a potential biomarker for the same. They say their animal studies carry clinical and translational potential. Mouse-model experiments showed that preventing the early infiltration of CCR2+ macrophages into the heart, after experimental pressure overload, significantly lessened the heart's enlargement and reduced pumping ability that leads to later heart failure. (2018-03-19)

Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infections
Research in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease. Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infections that go untreated. (2018-02-13)

New approach for treatment of contact allergy
Researchers from the University of Bonn have isolated a molecule that is suitable for the control of contact allergies. The study illuminates a central immune mechanism, which may also play a role in other inflammatory diseases such as arthritis or arteriosclerosis. The results will soon be published in the journal Molecular Therapy, but are already available online. (2017-10-30)

One step closer in explaining MS relapse during upper respiratory infection
For most of us, the flu is just the flu. We suffer through it for several days, and eventually bounce back. But for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological diseases, the flu can trigger a cascade of immune responses that result in a full-blown relapse of the disease. In a recent study, Illinois researchers shed light on what may be happening in the brains of MS patients during upper respiratory infections. (2017-08-08)

Cell senescence is regulated by innate DNA sensing
EPFL scientists have made new insights into the control of cell senescence, which is intimately linked to the development of cancer and aging. (2017-07-31)

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