Current Chernobyl News and Events

Current Chernobyl News and Events, Chernobyl News Articles.
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Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

Dynamics of radiocesium in forests after the Fukushima disaster: Concerns and some hope
The 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, Japan caused a great amount of radioactive cesium to spread to nearby forests. Now, in a chapter in the latest technical document of the International Atomic Energy Agency, researchers from Japan, in collaboration with experts in Europe, explore the dynamic flow of these radionuclides in forest ecosystems. Their compilation of data and analyses on radiocesium dynamics will help us develop better forest remediation strategies. (2021-02-03)

Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows. (2020-12-17)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Study: Single drop of blood could help rapidly detect radiation sickness
A new proof-of-concept study reports evidence that a new testing method has the potential to rapidly identify radiation sickness based on biomarkers measured through a single drop of blood. Scientists at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute say the test could help save lives through early and real-time identification of the condition to enable timely clinical interventions. (2020-07-15)

'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)

The pros and cons of radiotherapy: Will it work for you?
Women undergoing radiotherapy for many cancers are more likely than men to be cured, but the side effects are more brutal, according to one of Australia's most experienced radiation oncology medical physicists. (2020-03-29)

Radionuclide levels in freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers
After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, managing environmental radionuclide contamination efficiently has become incredibly important. In light of this, a team of scientists from Miharu, Japan, have provided insights that could potentially lead to more accurate environmental risk management in the future. They have shown that the factors affecting contamination of freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers. (2020-03-02)

Study analyzes impact of switch from nuclear power to coal, suggests directions for policy
A new study used data from the United States to analyze the costs and benefits of electricity production from coal-fired versus nuclear sources. The study's authors conclude that policymakers should look at nuclear power as a low-carbon electricity source, but that utilities will need to have incentives to do so. (2020-02-26)

Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. This has implications for improving radiotherapy for cancer and understanding the origin of life. (2020-02-05)

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima
Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life. (2020-01-06)

Nurses sleep less before a scheduled shift, hindering patient care and safety
Nurses sleep nearly an hour and a half less before work days compared to days off, which hurts patient care and safety, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in Sleep Health, the journal of the National Sleep Foundation. (2019-12-12)

Bumblebees exposed to Chernobyl-levels of radiation consume more nectar
Researchers at Stirling University have found that exposure to chronic low-dose radiation, found in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, negatively affects bumblebee energy use by increasing their metabolic rate and food consumption. The preliminary results will be presented on Dec. 12, at the British Ecological Society Annual Meeting in Belfast. (2019-12-11)

Nuclear reactors with a newly proposed barrier could've withstood Chernobyl and Fukushima
To regain public confidence in nuclear power -- a sustainable source of renewable energy, as well as bridging the gap between what we know today and what is going on in practice, scientists propose a new safety barrier to be implemented in large reactors around the world. The new barrier, described in the open-access journal Nuclear Energy and Technology, could reduce the probability of core melt to that of a large meteorite hitting the site. (2019-11-26)

Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. But scientists need to find a way to remove radioactive isotopes, both from wastewater generated by nuclear power plants and from the environment in case of a spill. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny, self-propelled robots that remove radioactive uranium from simulated wastewater. (2019-10-30)

Runaway mitochondria cause telomere damage in cells
Targeted damage to mitochondria produces a 'Chernobyl effect' inside cells, pelting the nucleus with harmful reactive oxygen species and causing chromosomal damage. (2019-08-26)

What exactly happened at Chernobyl? (video)
On April 26, 1986 the Soviet Union's Chernobyl Power Complex nuclear reactor 4 exploded. This week on Reactions, we talk about the chemistry behind this catastrophic event: https://youtu.be/uvpS2lUHZD8. (2019-08-16)

Biomarker to avoid safety risk for the sleep deprived
New research published today in the The Journal of Physiology shows that a range of eye-movement tests provide a reliable biomarker of individual acute sleep loss. (2019-08-08)

Mysterious release of radioactive material uncovered
In September 2017, a slightly radioactive cloud moved across Europe. The reason was not a reactor accident, but an accident in a nuclear reprocessing plant. The exact origin of the radioactivity is difficult to determine, but the data suggests a release site in the southern Urals. This is where the Russian nuclear facility Majak is located. The incident never caused any kind of health risks for the European population. (2019-07-29)

Radiation in parts of Marshall Islands is higher than Chernobyl
Radiation levels in parts of the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific Ocean, where the United States conducted nearly 70 nuclear tests during the Cold War, are still alarmingly high. Columbia University researchers tested soil samples on four uninhabited isles and discovered that they contained concentrations of nuclear isotopes that are significantly higher than those found near Chernobyl and Fukushima. (2019-07-17)

Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation may increase the risk of hypertension, a known cause of heart disease and stroke
A long-term study of Russian nuclear plant workers suggests that prolonged low-dose radiation exposure increases the risk of hypertension. This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. The higher the cumulative dose of radiation, the greater the risk, the study showed. (2019-05-03)

Study reveals wildlife is abundant in Chernobyl
A scavenger study that used fish carcasses as bait provides additional evidence that wildlife is abundant in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. (2019-01-31)

Sleep research uncovers dire consequences to deprivation
Researchers at Michigan State University conducted the largest experimentally controlled study on sleep deprivation to date, revealing just how detrimental operating without sleep can be in everything from bakers adding too much salt to cookies to surgeons botching surgeries. (2018-10-02)

Ukrainian villages still suffering legacy of Chernobyl more than 30 years on
Milk in parts of Ukraine has radioactivity levels up to five times over the country's official safe limit, new research shows. (2018-06-08)

Zn-InsP6 complex can enhance excretion of radioactive strontium from the body
Researchers at Kanazawa University have found a new phenomenon that a complex of myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) with zinc enhances excretion of radioactive strontium from the body. (2018-06-01)

How did the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident impact thyroid cancer risk?
New lessons are being learned about risk assessment and predicting the extent of thyroid cancer occurrence following radiation exposure due to a nuclear power plant accident such as the one in March 2011 in Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. (2017-12-21)

Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident
New research suggests that few people, if any, should be asked to leave their homes after a big nuclear accident, which is what happened in March 2011 following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. (2017-11-19)

New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster
A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology, an official journal of the American Nuclear Society. (2017-11-17)

New-generation material removes iodine from water
Material developed at Dartmouth College scrubs iodine from water for the first time and could hold the key to cleaning nuclear accidents. (2017-06-07)

Lessons learned from the Fukushima accident
A recent article provides an overview of the impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station accident in Japan in 2011 and subsequent remediation measures, comparing similarities and differences with the lessons learned from the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in Ukraine. (2016-10-25)

Leaders in Healthcare
Join aspiring leaders to address some of the biggest issues facing healthcare leadership and management in the UK, affecting the professional workforce as well as the population. (2016-10-19)

Amid terror threats, new hope for radiation antidote
Researchers have identified promising drugs that could lead to the first antidote for radiation exposure that might result from a dirty bomb terror attack or a nuclear accident such as Chernobyl. (2016-05-31)

Chernobyl, three decades on
The Chernobyl disaster struck 30 years ago today. The devastating radiation spill created a huge radio-ecological laboratory where University of South Carolina professor Tim Mousseau and colleagues have been studying the effects of radiation on free-living organisms since 2000. In addition to cataloging a range of harmful effects that even low doses of radiation have on life, the scientists recently published a meta-analysis examining how a specific pathway, oxidative stress, is a key component of the damage. (2016-04-26)

30 years after Chernobyl, UGA camera study reveals wildlife abundance in CEZ
While humans are now scarce in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, continued studies--including a just-published camera study conducted by researchers from the University of Georgia's Savannah River Ecology Laboratory--validate findings that wildlife populations are abundant at the site. The camera study, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment and led by UGA's James Beasley, is the first remote-camera scent-station survey conducted within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, or CEZ. (2016-04-18)

OUP publishes free article collection about Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster
March 11, 2016, marks five years since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster. In the last five years, researchers all over the world have been conducting substantial studies to find out the effect on the environment, human bodies, and our society. In honor of their great work, Oxford University Press has made 30 research articles about the accident from nine journals freely available to read online for a year. (2016-03-09)

Screening truffles for radioactivity 30 years from Chernobyl
Some forest mushrooms, such as wild porcini, can accumulate dangerous levels of radioactivity from the soils they grow in. But until now it was unclear if the same was true for truffles, fungi that range among the most expensive foods in the world. Researchers have analyzed Burgundy truffles collected in central Europe and found they contain only negligible amounts of radioactive cesium, being safe for consumption. The results are published Feb. 25 in Biogeosciences. (2016-02-25)

Radiation causes blindness in wild animals in Chernobyl
This year marks 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Vast amounts of radioactive particles spread over large areas in Europe. (2016-02-10)

International research team finds thriving wildlife populations in Chernobyl
A team of international researchers, including James Beasley, assistant professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and the Warnell School Forestry and Natural Resources, has discovered abundant populations of wildlife at Chernobyl, the site of the 1986 nuclear accident that released radioactive particles into the environment and forced a massive evacuation of the human population. (2015-10-05)

At site of world's worst nuclear disaster, the animals have returned
In 1986, after a fire and explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant released radioactive particles into the air, thousands of people left the area, never to return. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Oct. 5 have found that the Chernobyl site looks less like a disaster zone and more like a nature preserve, teeming with elk, roe deer, red deer, wild boar, and wolves. (2015-10-05)

Fusion reactors 'economically viable' say experts
Fusion reactors could become an economically viable means of generating electricity within a few decades, and policy makers should start planning to build them as a replacement for conventional nuclear power stations, according to new research. (2015-10-02)

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