Current Chesapeake Bay News and Events

Current Chesapeake Bay News and Events, Chesapeake Bay News Articles.
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Migratory birds track climate across the year
As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range. (2021-02-18)

The 20 best places to tackle US farm nitrogen pollution
A pioneering study of U.S nitrogen use in agriculture has identified 20 places across the country where farmers, government, and citizens should target nitrogen reduction efforts. The 20 nitrogen ''hotspots of opportunity''--which appear on a striking map--represent a whopping 63% of the total surplus nitrogen balance in U.S. croplands, but only 24% of U.S. cropland area. Nitrogen inputs are so high in these areas that farmers can most likely reduce nitrogen use without hurting crop yields. (2021-02-16)

Managing crab and lobster catches could offer long-term benefits
A study by the University of Plymouth (UK) has found that managing the density of crab and lobster pots at an optimum level increases the quality of catch, benefits the marine environment and makes the industry more sustainable in the long term. (2021-02-15)

Method for temporal monitoring of microplastic sedimentation
Researchers in Finland have tested the sediment trap method to analyse the annual accumulation rates of microplastics in a body of water, and possible seasonal variation therein. The most important advantage of the method is that it can be used to determine the time it takes from microplastics to enter and accumulate in bodies of water. (2021-02-15)

New study reveals biodiversity important at regional scales
New research shows that biodiversity is important not just at the traditional scale of short-term plot experiments--in which ecologists monitor the health of a single meadow, forest grove, or pond after manipulating its species counts--but when measured over decades and across regional landscapes as well. The findings can help guide conservation planning and enhance efforts to make human communities more sustainable. (2021-02-11)

New study finds climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range
Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range. Researchers conclude the northward range shift demonstrates the young sharks are being subjected to a loss of suitable thermal habitat, meaning water temperatures within their preferred temperature range are becoming harder to find. (2021-02-09)

Changing cropping systems in impaired watersheds can produce water quality gains
Growing the right crop in the right place within an impaired watershed can achieve significant water quality improvements, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a novel study in the drainage of a Susquehanna River tributary in an agricultural area in southeastern Pennsylvania. (2021-02-09)

An ancient economy
As one of the most experienced archaeologists studying California's Native Americans, Lynn Gamble(link is external) knew the Chumash Indians had been using shell beads as money for at least 800 years. (2021-01-28)

Study finds water quality improvements in Maryland's Choptank River
The Chesapeake Bay has a long history of nutrient pollution resulting in degraded water quality. However, scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are reporting some improvements in the Choptank River on Maryland's Eastern Shore, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay that is often used as a model for progress in restoring the estuary. (2021-01-26)

Combined river flows could send up to 3 billion microplastics a day into the Bay of Bengal
New research shows the Ganges River - with the combined flows of the Brahmaputra and Meghna rivers - could be responsible for up to 3 billion microplastic particles entering the Bay of Bengal every day. (2021-01-22)

California harbor porpoises rebound after coastal gillnetting stopped
Harbor porpoises have rebounded in a big way off California. Their populations have recovered dramatically since the end of state set-gillnet fisheries that years ago entangled and killed them in the nearshore waters they frequent. These coastal set-gillnet fisheries are distinct from federally-managed offshore drift-gillnet fisheries. They have been prohibited in inshore state waters for more than a decade. The new research indicates that the coastal set gillnets had taken a greater toll on harbor porpoise than previously realized. (2021-01-20)

Study finds growing numbers of critically endangered sawfish in Miami waters
MIAMI--A new collaborative study lead by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found evidence of growing numbers of critically endangered smalltooth sawfish within coastal waters off Miami, Florida, an area where the regular presence of this rare species had gone largely undocumented, until now. (2020-12-18)

'Peecycling' payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale
Diverting urine away from municipal wastewater treatment plants and recycling the nutrient-rich liquid to make crop fertilizer would result in multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. (2020-12-15)

'Windows of opportunity' crucial for cutting Chesapeake nutrient, sediment loads
The vast majority of nutrients and sediment washed into streams flowing into the Chesapeake Bay are picked up by deluges from severe storms that occur on relatively few days of the year. That is the conclusion of a new study led by Penn State researchers, who say it offers clues for cleaning up the impaired estuary. (2020-12-14)

The edible marine snail now contains a new species
Recognizing species is important for understanding regional biodiversity and for environmental conservation. However, taxonomic identity is sometimes obscure even with the organisms that are closest to human life. (2020-12-10)

Incredible vision in ancient marine creatures drove an evolutionary arms race
Ancient deep sea creatures called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race according to new research published today. (2020-12-02)

Once in a lifetime floods to become regular occurrences by end of century
Superstorm Sandy brought flood-levels to the New York region that had not been seen in generations. Now, due to the impact of climate change, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have found that 100-year and 500-year flood levels could become regular occurrences for the thousands of homes surrounding Jamaica Bay, New York by the end of the century. (2020-12-02)

Earthquake scenario for large German city
What if there is a major earthquake near Cologne? This scenario is subject of the ''Risk Analysis in Civil Protection 2019'' report that was recently submitted to the German Bundestag. On the basis of extensive research, experts have listed in detail effects to be expected. What Germans usually only know from abroad results from modeling a strong earthquake near the megacity of Cologne: ground shaking, damaged and destroyed houses, blocked roads, many injured and dead. (2020-11-30)

Largest aggregation of fishes in abyssal deep sea recorded by UH researchers
The largest aggregation of fishes ever recorded in the abyssal deep sea was discovered by a team of oceanographers during an expedition in the Clarion Clipperton Zone. Their findings were published recently in Deep-Sea Research. (2020-11-23)

Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?
A new analysis of California's Monterey Bay evaluates kelp's potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations. (2020-11-19)

The first detection of marine fish DNA in sediment sequences going back 300 years
Far too little is known about the long-term dynamics of the abundance of most macro-organism species. We used sedimentary DNA technology to quantify marine fish DNA abundance in sediment sequences spanning the last 300 years. This study first shows the existence of fish DNA in the sequences and proves that fish abundance can be tracked using sedimentary DNA, highlighting the utility of sedimentary DNA for researchers to acquire lengthy records of macro-organism species abundance. (2020-11-16)

A study has demonstrated that omega-3 rich foods improve post-heart attack prognosis
A team of researchers from the Germans Trias i Pujol Hospital and Research Institute (IGTP) and the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) has shown that regularly consuming foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, from both animal and vegetable origins, strengthens the heart's membranes and helps improve the prognosis in the event of a myocardial infarction. To arrive at these conclusions, they used data from 950 patients. (2020-10-27)

Global 'BiteMap' reveals how marine food webs may change with climate
Where are small marine animals most vulnerable to getting eaten? In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Oct. 26, scientists sketched the first global ''BiteMap'' showing where the ocean's mid-sized predators are most active. By fishing with dried squid baits called ''squid pops,'' they discovered rising temperatures can shape entire communities of predators and have potential impacts lower down the food web. (2020-10-26)

Tocilizumab doesn't ease symptoms or prevent death in moderately ill COVID-19 inpatients
The drug tocilizumab (Actemra) does not reduce the need for breathing assistance with mechanical ventilation or prevent death in moderately ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, casts doubt on earlier research suggesting that tocilizumab, which is commonly prescribed for rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, might be an effective treatment for patients with worsening cases of COVID-19. (2020-10-21)

Was Hong Kong once a coral reef paradise?
Researchers from The University of Hong Kong's School of Biological Sciences and The Swire Institute of Marine Science, have for the first time investigated the historical presence of coral communities in the Greater Bay Area, revealing a catastrophic range collapse and loss of diversity that occurred in the last several decades. (2020-10-15)

Scientists release previously unseen footage showing environmental impacts of pot fishing
The findings of research by the University of Plymouth go against previous thinking around the damage caused by pot fishing to the seabed (2020-10-13)

Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Now, a long-term monitoring study shows this success extends far beyond a single plant species, rippling out to engender substantial increases in fish and invertebrate abundance, water clarity, and the trapping of pollution-causing carbon and nitrogen. (2020-10-07)

210Pb dating of marine sedimentary cores
Fourteen laboratories participated in this interlaboratory comparison exercise (ILC). The results indicated good analytical performance by the participating laboratories, but the results of the 210Pb dating did not reach the desired level of satisfaction. (2020-10-05)

Harvesting vegetation on riparian buffers barely reduces water-quality benefits
Allowing farmers to harvest vegetation from their riparian buffers will not significantly impede the ability of those streamside tracts to protect water quality by capturing nutrients and sediment -- and it will boost farmers' willingness to establish buffers. (2020-10-02)

Scientists repeat century-old study to reveal evidence of evolutionary rescue in the wild
Repeating a study conducted in 1914, scientists from the University of Plymouth have shown that species may be able to evolve and adapt to rapid climate change. (2020-10-01)

In San Francisco bay area, shutdown reduced anthropogenic noise, which changed birdsong quality
Reductions in humanmade noise resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led birds in parts of California to adapt their songs to be higher quality, a new study reports. (2020-09-24)

URI grad student finds PFAS in seabirds from Narragansett Bay, Massachusetts Bay, Cape Fear
A recent study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student researching PFAS exposure found high levels of the compounds in seabirds from offshore Massachusetts and coastal Rhode Island and North Carolina adding to the accumulating pile of evidence related to human and animal exposure to these chemical compounds. (2020-09-23)

NASA observes Hurricane Sally making early morning landfall in Alabama    
NASA's Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided views of the strength, extent and rainfall potential as Hurricane Sally was making landfall during the morning hours of Sept. 16. (2020-09-16)

Climate change could deliver more sediment and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta
Climate change could deliver more silt, sand and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta, along with a mix of other potential consequences and benefits, according to a new study in the AGU journal Water Resources Research. (2020-09-02)

Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement in the wild
An international team of scientists has succeeded in using the signature whistles of individual bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Namibia to estimate the size of the population and track their movement. The research, led by Stellenbosch University and the University of Plymouth, marks the first time that acoustic monitoring has been used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates of dolphin populations. (2020-08-31)

Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
A new study has shown for the first time that acoustic monitoring can be used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates of dolphin populations. (2020-08-27)

Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay. (2020-08-24)

Analyzing the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
The Guadalquivir estuary showed the highest density of early stages fish and also of macro-zooplankton (fish prey). A higher concentration of organic matter (preferential food of the macrozooplanton in the Guadalquivir), provided by a greater flow of fresh water and correlated with total suspended solids, inorganic matter and turbidity, were the most typical characteristics of the Guadalquivir. (2020-08-13)

Physicists cast doubt on neutrino theory
University of Cincinnati physicists, as part of an international research team, are raising doubts about the existence of an exotic subatomic particle that failed to show up in twin experiments. (2020-08-11)

Digital buccaneers boost box office bang
Pirated movies circulated online after their theatrical release saw about 3% higher box office receipts because of the increase in word-of-mouth advertising. (2020-08-06)

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