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Current Chesapeake Bay News and Events, Chesapeake Bay News Articles.
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NASA providing data on Tropical Storm Isaias as it blankets eastern seaboard
Tropical Storm Isaias made landfall late on Aug. 3 and by today, Aug. 4, the huge storm stretched from Virginia to Maine. NASA satellites have been providing forecasters with rainfall rates, cloud top temperatures, storm extent and strength as Isaias batters the U.S. East Coast. (2020-08-04)

NASA puts visible and water vapor eyes on Tropical Storm Isaias
NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible and water vapor imagery as Tropical Storm Isaias continued moving along the east coast of Florida. On Aug. 3, 2020, warnings and watches stretched from Florida to Maine. (2020-08-03)

Satellite survey shows California's sinking coastal hotspots
Using precise measurements from state-of-the-art satellite-based radar that can detect the land surface rise and fall with millimeter accuracy, an ASU research team has, for the first time, tracked the entire California coast's vertical land motion. They've identified local hotspots of the sinking coast, in the cities of San Diego, Los Angeles, Santa Cruz and San Francisco, who will be at a higher flooding risk during the decades ahead of projected sea-level rise. (2020-07-31)

Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary
The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary -- Morro Bay -- may be causing widespread erosion. Over the last century, Morro Bay has been building up sediment quickly. After the die-off, however, erosion took place in more than 90% of the places where eelgrass previously grew. (2020-07-27)

Ocean features and changes in the past are explored to anticipate future climate
The Quaternary International journal has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Stratigraphy and Palaeontology describing, in detail, the climate changes taking place in the Bay of Biscay over the last 37,000 years. Specifically, it details these changes mainly through the study of foraminifera and ostracod species predominating in various climatic intervals. This palaeoceanographic study is part of a broader one covering the last 150,000 years. (2020-07-24)

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely
Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans. A study of bottlenose dolphins reveals that in early life, dolphins devote more time to building connections that could give them an edge later on. Analyzing nearly 30 years of records for some 1700 dolphins in Australia, researchers find that dolphins under age 10 seek out peers and activities that could help them forge bonds and build skills they'll need in adulthood. (2020-07-23)

Two new species of parasite discovered in crabs -- discovery will help prevent infection of other marine species
Two new species of parasite, previously unknown to science, have been discovered in crabs in Swansea Bay, Wales, during a study on disease in the Celtic and Irish Seas. Both species are emerging pathogens, and were discovered infecting the common shore crab, so they could potentially have damaging effects on fisheries and other marine species. The researchers' discovery will help inform measures to reduce this risk. (2020-07-15)

Context matters: Neighborhood factors associated with heavier drinking
People in wealthier neighborhoods drink alcohol twice as frequently as people in poorer areas, suggests a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. (2020-07-12)

Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. That's the conclusion of a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on June 25. The findings are the first to show that dolphins are not only capable of learning new ways to catch prey, but they are also motivated to learn from peers, not just from their mothers, the researchers say. (2020-06-25)

Shelling out for dinner -- Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins use empty gastropod shells to trap prey. A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn this foraging technique outside the mother-calf bond - showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes. (2020-06-25)

Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes. (2020-06-25)

Seaweed takes scientists on trip 'through time' in the waters of Monterey Bay
New research led by Monterey Bay Aquarium tapped into a collection of dried, pressed seaweed to understand what the bay was like before the impacts of modern human activity. Researchers used the older algae specimens to extend the Bakun upwelling index back to 1878, 70 years before it began being monitoring Monterey Bay. (2020-06-16)

Protecting bays from ocean acidification
As oceans absorb more man-made carbon dioxide from the air, a process of ocean acidification occurs that can have a negative impact on marine life. But coastal waterways, such as Chesapeake Bay, can also suffer from low oxygen and acidification. New research from the University of Delaware identifies one way to protect these waterways -- the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). (2020-06-12)

Alien frog invasion wreaks havoc on natural habitat
Indiscriminate feeding by an alien population of the carnivorous spotted-thighed frog -- could severely affect the native biodiversity of southern Australia according to a new study by the University of South Australia. (2020-06-04)

NASA finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Cristobal
The third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean basin has been generating large amounts of rainfall over Mexico's Yucatan and parts of Central America. Using satellite data, NASA analyzed that heavy rainfall and provided forecasters with valuable cloud top temperature data to help assess the strength of the storm. (2020-06-03)

NASA analyzes Gulf of Mexico's reborn tropical depression soaking potential
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that strong storms from a redeveloped tropical cyclone were soaking parts of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Tropical Depression 03L is expected to generate heavy rainfall in the region. (2020-06-02)

Novel bioaccumulative compounds found in marine bivalves
The present study screened known and unknown organohalogen compounds present in mussel and sediment samples from Hiroshima Bay. The results provided scientific evidence that unknown mixed halogenated compounds are ubiquitous in the coastal environment and possess bioaccumulative potential as high as persistent organic pollutants. (2020-06-02)

Report on New Caledonia's coral reefs offers a glimmer of hope for the future
The latest report from Global Reef Expedition scientists provides a promising assessment of coral reef health and resiliency in New Caledonia. (2020-06-01)

Chinese pterodactyl wings its way to the United Kingdom
The first ever specimen of a pterodactyl, more commonly found in China and Brazil, has been found in the United Kingdom. (2020-05-28)

NASA satellites covering typhoon Amphan headed for landfall
NASA satellites have been providing forecasters with various types of imagery on Typhoon Amphan as it heads toward a landfall near the border of eastern India and Bangladesh on May 20, 2020. (2020-05-20)

Less water could sustain more Californians if we make every drop count
California cities can no longer rely on their three traditional water-coping strategies: over-drafting groundwater, depleting streams and importing water from far away. A new analysis focuses on several strategies that, taken together, can help cities provide for their growing population with prudent public policies and investments. (2020-05-19)

Oyster farming and shorebirds likely can coexist
Oyster farming as currently practiced along the Delaware Bayshore does not significantly impact four shorebirds, including the federally threatened red knot, which migrates thousands of miles from Chile annually, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings, published in the journal Ecosphere, likely apply to other areas around the country including the West Coast and Gulf Coast, where oyster aquaculture is expanding, according to Rutgers experts. (2020-05-14)

Portland State researcher develops new model to accurately date historic earthquakes
Three earthquakes in the Monterey Bay Area, occurring in 1838, 1890 and 1906, happened without a doubt on the San Andreas Fault, according to a new paper by a Portland State University researcher. The paper, 'New Insights into Paleoseismic Age Models on the Northern San Andreas Fault: Charcoal In-built ages and Updated Earthquake Correlations,' was recently published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2020-05-14)

Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers found that when rockfish reach 32 inches in length they leave Chesapeake Bay and become ocean migrators. Small fish stayed in the Bay had higher mortality rates than those that undertook ocean migrations. (2020-05-14)

Saving livestock by thinking like a predator
Humans have struggled to reduce the loss of livestock to carnivores for thousands of years, and yet, solutions remain elusive. According to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, solving this ancient puzzle requires going back to Ecology 101. Simply put, getting in the mind of predators -- considering how they hunt, how their prey behaves and the landscape -- will help wildlife managers discourage wild carnivores from preying on valuable livestock. (2020-05-14)

DNA surprises surfacing in the Atlantic: Species far from their usual southern homes
Scientists investigating shifting Atlantic Ocean migration patterns bottled the genetic traces of species far north of their normal homes. Rockefeller University scientists simply fishing for DNA in seawater found Brazilian cownose rays and Gulf kingfishes - never known north of the Gulf of Mexico, and Chesapeake Bay, VA respectively - off New Jersey's coast, a 2 hour drive south of NY City. The study demonstrates an accurate, inexpensive way to detect long-predicted marine life range changes. (2020-05-12)

Alaskan rainforests are a global lichen hotspot, new study shows
The rainforest fjords of Southeastern Alaska harbor one of the highest concentrations of lichen diversity found anywhere on Earth, according to a new study spearheaded by University of Alberta scientists. (2020-05-12)

Marine litter in the Bay of Biscay
The scientific journal 'Marine Pollution Bulletin' has just published 'Microplastics in the Bay of Biscay: an overview', a piece of work by the 'Materials+Technologies' research group (GMT) of the Faculty of Engineering - Gipuzkoa. It is the first scientific paper that analyses all the research studies conducted until now about the presence of microplastics in the Bay of Biscay. It includes the results obtained in various marine compartments (water bodies, marine sediments and biota) highlighting the limitations and challenges to knowledge that have been found. (2020-04-30)

Scientists reveal a close relationship between air temperature and the area of Antarctic polynyas
Reanalysis and observational data reveal interactive effects between air temperature and the area of the Terra Nova Bay polynya. The air temperature seems to have a significant effect on the polynya area. (2020-04-20)

Estuaries are warming at twice the rate of oceans and atmosphere
A 12-year study of 166 estuaries in south-east Australia shows that the waters of lakes, creeks, rivers and lagoons increased 2.16 degrees in temperature and increased acidity. Researchers say this could impact economic activity and biodiversity worldwide. (2020-04-14)

Where you live may influence your baby's behavior
Infants from rural families tend to display negative emotions such as anger and frustration more frequently than their urban counterparts, according to a recent study in the Journal of Community Psychology. Babies born in big cities, on the other hand, typically are less fussy and not as bothered by limits set by their caregivers. (2020-03-18)

Microplastics found in a quarter of San Diego estuary fish
Nearly a quarter of fish collected from a San Diego stream contain microplastics. The study, which examined plastics in coastal sediments and three species of fish, showed that the frequency and types of plastic ingested varied with fish species and, in some cases, size or age of fish. (2020-03-18)

NASA finds ex-Tropical Cyclone 21S affecting Australia's Pilbara Coast
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Ex-Tropical Cyclone 21S. Although no longer a tropical cyclone, the system has triggered warnings for heavy rainfall and winds. (2020-03-12)

Climate variations may impact the base of the food web along the California coast
A recent study conducted by researchers at Cal Poly revealed that in addition to seasonal changes in oceanographic conditions, natural climate cycles greatly influenced the base of the food web at the Cal Poly Pier in Central California. These natural climate oscillations influenced the seasonal timing and abundance of different phytoplankton groups, which impact marine ecosystem health differently, and may offer a glimpse of how these organisms will respond to future climate change-driven ocean warming. (2020-03-09)

Waves and tides have bigger impact on marine life than human activity
The biggest impacts on the sea life in Swansea Bay (Wales) come from waves and tides rather than human activity, a wide-ranging new study -- encompassing over 170 species of fish and other sea life such as crabs, squid and starfish -- has revealed. (2020-03-04)

Study find delta helps to decrease the impact of river flooding
Most coastal cities and ports face a double threat from storm surge and river flooding. Infrastructure development along waterways and sea-level rise increase vulnerability for these communities. In a recent publication, The Propagation of Fluvial Flood Waves Through a Backwater-Estuarine Environment, historical data is examined to determine how to reduce the risk of coastal river flooding to communities. (2020-03-04)

Is there a technological solution to aquatic dead zones?
Could pumping oxygen-rich surface water into the depths of lakes, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters help ameliorate dangerous dead zones? New work led by Carnegie's David Koweek and Ken Caldeira says yes, although they caution that further research would be needed to understand any possible side effects before implementing such an approach. (2020-03-02)

Research reveals unique reproductive trait for seagrass
New research by a team from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and University of Western Australia reveals that species of the seagrass genus Posidonia have evolved a remarkable adaptation for ocean survival: a winged seed whose shape harnesses the force of underwater currents to hold it on the seafloor for rooting. (2020-02-14)

New potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning identified
One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters--the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan--may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found. (2020-02-13)

Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice
Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available. (2020-02-12)

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