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Current Chesapeake Bay News and Events, Chesapeake Bay News Articles.
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Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur. (2020-02-12)

Dolphins gather in female family groups
Social clusters including mothers' groups play an important role in the life of southern Australian bottlenose dolphins, a new study shows. Like giraffes, lions, hyenas and grey kangaroos, bottlenose dolphins appear to form social bonds with kin and other females in similar reproductive condition, while maintaining moderate and loose social bonds with some same-sex individuals. (2020-02-10)

Regioselective functionalization of perylenes reduces voltage loss in organic solar cells
Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science and Shizuoka University in Japan report that regioselective bay-functionalization of perylene derivatives and the use of the synthesized perylene diimide (PDI) as an acceptor material reduces the open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells (OSCs). The origin of the high VOC was that bay-functionalization liftes LUMO level, leading to the reduction of the energy offset for charge separation and non-radiative recombination loss. (2020-02-05)

Microplastic hotspots
A new study from the University of Delaware found high concentrations of microplastics in so-called convergence zones, the areas where the fresher water from the Delaware River meets the saltier water of the Atlantic Ocean and the surface currents converge. They found the distribution of plastics also depends on the force of the winds. (2020-02-03)

'Blob' research shows ecological effects that halted fishing and hiked whale entanglements
An ecological pileup of unprecedented changes in the ocean off the West Coast beginning about 2014 led to record entanglements of humpback and other whales, putting the region's most valuable commercial fishery at risk, new research shows. (2020-01-27)

Corals' partnership with microalgae helps in stressful times but there's a trade-off
In the warmer and brighter shallow waters of Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu Hawaiian rice coral host more heat-tolerant microbes in their tissues compared to rice coral communities in cooler and darker deep waters, according to research published recently by scientists at the University of Hawai'i. While this is advantageous in the short term--helping corals weather a heat wave, for example--the price they pay is lower nutrition after the storm. (2020-01-21)

New study shows how patients' health values can impact vital pelvic floor treatment
Researchers and health professionals in Swansea have revealed the value women put on their own health can have a direct effect on the success of medical treatment for pelvic floor problems. (2019-12-20)

Texas A&M study reveals domestic horse breed has third-lowest genetic diversity
A new study by Dr. Gus Cothran, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has found that the Cleveland Bay horse breed has the third-lowest genetic variation level of domestic horses, ranking above only the notoriously inbred Friesian and Clydesdale breeds. This lack of genetic diversity puts the breed at risk for a variety of health conditions. (2019-12-18)

Warming climate will impact dead zones in Chesapeake Bay
In recent years, scientists have projected increasingly large summer dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay, areas where there is little or no oxygen for living things like crabs and fish to thrive, even as long-term efforts to reduce nutrient pollution continue. Researchers from University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science factored in local impacts of climate change to make projections of what the oxygen content of the Chesapeake Bay will look like in the future. (2019-12-15)

Key to helping southern sea otter is in repopulating estuaries such as San Francisco Bay
California could triple the population of endangered southern sea otters by repopulating San Francisco Bay. (2019-12-10)

Crossing borders and growing resistance: a superbug from south Asia
Using whole genome sequencing, researchers have been able to trace the origins and global spread of a multi-drug resistant, community Staphylococcus aureus lineage from the Indian subcontinent, known as the Bengal Bay clone. (2019-11-26)

Study paves way to better understanding, treatment of arthritis
Oregon State University research has provided the first complete, cellular-level look at what's going on in joints afflicted by osteoarthritis, a debilitating and costly condition that affects nearly one-quarter of adults in the United States. (2019-11-25)

Endangered whales react to environmental changes
Some 'canaries' are 50 feet long, weigh 70 tons, and are nowhere near a coal mine. But the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale is sending the same kind of message about disruptive change in the environment by rapidly altering its use of important habitat areas off the New England coast. (2019-11-19)

Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West
Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast. (2019-11-13)

Cats of the sea offer insights into territorial behavior of wild fishes
Researchers carrying out regular monitoring of a Marine Protected Area off the UK coastline noticed species of wrasse demonstrating almost cat-like behaviour as they chased lasers shone onto the seabed. (2019-11-12)

Scientists study impact of sediments and nutrients from Conowingo Dam on Chesapeake Bay
A new study examines the influences of a river dam on the fate of sediments and nutrients on an estuary, using the Conowingo Dam and the Chesapeake Bay as a case study. (2019-11-11)

NASA finds a stronger Matmo headed for landfall
Matmo strengthened from a tropical storm to a storm with hurricane-force in the overnight hours of Nov. 7, 2019. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and found Matmo appeared more organized. Warnings are in effect in northeastern India and Bangladesh as Matmo approaches. (2019-11-08)

NASA observes Tropical Storm Matmo in North Central Bay of Bengal
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean and found that Tropical Storm Matmo was positioned in the center of that body of water. (2019-11-07)

Choosing most cost-effective practices for sites could save in bay cleanup
Using site-specific watershed data to determine the most cost-effective agricultural best management practices -- rather than requiring all the recommended practices be implemented across the entire watershed -- could make staying below the Chesapeake Bay's acceptable pollution load considerably less expensive. (2019-11-07)

Study shows invasive blue catfish can tolerate high salinities
A new study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science warns that blue catfish -- an invasive species in several Chesapeake Bay tributaries -- tolerate salinities higher than most freshwater fishes, and thus may be able to expand their range downstream into mainstem Chesapeake waters, and from there into new Bay tributaries and even Delaware Bay. (2019-11-05)

Poor water conditions drive invasive snakeheads onto land
In a new study published Oct. 21, 2019 in the peer-reviewed journal Integrative Organismal Biology, Wake Forest researcher Noah Bressman reported for the first time the water conditions that could drive snakeheads onto land. (2019-10-22)

Underwater grandmothers reveal big population of lethal sea snakes
A group of snorkelling grandmothers is helping scientists better understand marine ecology by photographing venomous sea snakes in waters off the city of Noumea, New Caledonia. (2019-10-22)

Drug treats inflammation associated with genetic heart disease
When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it's usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart failure in some patients. (2019-10-17)

Tailings dumped into Portmán Bay continue to release metals into the sea 25 years later
The waters of the Mediterranean Sea continue to receive dissolved metals from the mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia) 25 years after the cessation of mining activity. A study by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), in collaboration with UB researchers, shows that the sea continues to be contaminated through groundwater containing heavy metals such as iron, cadmium, nickel, zinc and lead. (2019-10-16)

E-cigarettes, tobacco and cannabis products are littering high schools
High schools in the San Francisco Bay Area are being contaminated by plastics and toxic litter from e-cigarettes, cannabis products and combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigarillos, a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has found. (2019-10-10)

Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals
Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a study by scientists at Duke University and Fudan University suggests. In all but extreme situations, these interventions significantly buffer the impacts of climate change and can buy sinking cities and bleaching corals time to adapt until the beneficial impacts of global emissions reductions kick in. (2019-10-07)

Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population
The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study in Oryx--The International Journal of Conservation documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary. (2019-09-23)

Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water
While collecting water samples and plankton, researchers discovered a high concentration of microplastics, which are known to disrupt the marine food chain. (2019-09-12)

Tides don't always flush water out to sea, study shows
In Willapa Bay in Washington state, scientists discovered that water washing over tidal flats during high tides is largely the same water that washed over them during the previous high tide. This 'old' water has not been mixed with 'new' water and has lower levels of food for creatures in the bay. Oysters grown on flats where 'old' water stays longer showed a 25% drop in dry tissue weight per shell height. (2019-09-10)

NASA examines Dorian's rainfall, temperatures along Carolina coast
As Hurricane Dorian continued to lash the coast of the Carolinas NASA's IMERG assessed the rainfall the storm generated and NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures of the cloud tops to assess strength. (2019-09-06)

Researchers uncover role of earthquake motions in triggering a 'surprise' tsunami
In newly published research, an international team of geologists, geophysicists, and mathematicians show how coupled computer models can accurately recreate the conditions leading to the world's deadliest natural disasters of 2018, the Palu earthquake and tsunami, which struck western Sulawesi, Indonesia in September last year. (2019-09-05)

NASA measures Dorian's heavy rainfall from Bahamas to Carolinas
Hurricane Dorian continues to generate tremendous amounts of rainfall, and has left over three feet of rain in some areas of the Bahamas and is now lashing the Carolinas. NASA's IMERG product provided a look at those rainfall totals. (2019-09-05)

NASA estimates Hurricane Dorian's massive Bahama rainfall totals
Hurricane Dorian dropped excessive rainfall on the Bahamas and NASA calculated the rainfall the storm generated. (2019-09-04)

Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments
Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected. (2019-09-04)

New study reveals unique dietary strategy of a tropical marine sponge
Research conducted at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) on a marine sponge in Kāneʻohe Bay, Oahu revealed a unique feeding strategy, wherein the sponge animal acquires important components of its diet from symbiotic bacteria living within the sponge. (2019-08-14)

ASU researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years
About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. Its impact formed a 25-mile diameter crater that now lies buried beneath the Chesapeake Bay. A team of researchers has obtained drilling samples from the Ocean Drilling Project site 1073 and dated them with the 'uranium-thorium-helium technique' for the first time. (2019-08-13)

Looking out for the little guys
A new study, undertaken by a team of scientists from BIOS, the Bermuda Government Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the University of Rhode Island, used DNA markers to characterize the genetic diversity of Bermuda's baitfish populations. The island's baitfish were shown to exist in highly mixed populations of up to six different species indicating that individual fish from multiple locations around the island contribute to a single gene pool. (2019-08-07)

Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California
Changes to dissolved oxygen levels, water temperature, and salinity could have an even greater impact than ocean acidification on oyster growth in estuaries and bays. (2019-08-06)

Mapping Oregon coast harbor seal movements using wearable devices
Wearable devices fitted to harbor seals reveal their movements around the Oregon coast, for a population that has been increasing following the implementation of marine reserves and protection acts. The study publishes July 31, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sheanna Steingass from Oregon State University, USA, and colleagues. (2019-07-31)

Warmer winters could lead to longer blue crab season in Chesapeake Bay
Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are predicting that warmer winters in the Chesapeake Bay will likely lead to longer and more productive seasons for Maryland's favorite summer crustacean, the blue crab. (2019-07-31)

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