Current Childcare News and Events

Current Childcare News and Events, Childcare News Articles.
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Stress was leading reason teachers quit before pandemic, and COVID has made matters worse
Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic, according to a RAND Corporation survey of nearly 1,000 former public-school teachers. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school. Teachers cited stress nearly twice as often as insufficient pay as a reason for quitting. (2021-02-22)

Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

The impact of COVID-19 on motherhood
A new study explores the impact that the stress and isolation brought on by COVID-19 has had on people who were pregnant or gave birth during the pandemic. Many of those surveyed last summer reported additional stress brought on by disinformation in hospitals and lack of support with childcare and infant feeding. (2021-02-15)

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs
Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian PhDs have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities. (2021-02-11)

Maternal mental health needs attention during COVID-19 lockdowns
Mothers are at increased risk of mental health problems as they struggle to balance the demands of childcare and remote working in COVID-19 lockdowns, according to new research from an international team of researchers. (2021-02-03)

Study reveals gender imbalance in scholarly submissions during pandemic
A study conducted by Michelle Bell, Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), and postdoctoral associate Kelvin C. Fong found the rate of manuscript submission to a major peer-reviewed journal (American Journal of Public Health) were higher during the pandemic -- but also revealed a concerning imbalance in submissions by gender. (2021-02-03)

Certain parenting behaviors associated with positive changes in well-being during COVID-19 pandemic
A new longitudinal study in Germany examined day-to-day parenting behavior during the restrictions and closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic from the end of March until the end of April 2020. Research showed that autonomy-supportive parenting (offering meaningful choices when possible) contributed to positive well-being for both children and parents. (2021-01-19)

Mothers, but not fathers, with multiple children report more fragmented sleep
Mothers with multiple children report more fragmented sleep than mothers of a single child, but the number of children in a family doesn't seem to affect the quality of sleep for fathers, according to a study from McGill University. (2021-01-12)

How the American child welfare system lost its way
Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by age 18 one out of three children has been the subject of a child protective services investigation. Yet, many of these investigations and removals are unjustified, says University of Rochester health policy historian and physician Mical Raz. (2020-12-22)

Antigen tests -- are self-collected nasal swabs a reliable option?
Under certain conditions, antigen testing using self-collected swabs from the anterior nose may constitute a reliable alternative to antigen testing using nasopharyngeal swabs collected by health professionals. This is the conclusion drawn by a team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Heidelberg University Hospital. Results from their study have been published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2020-12-21)

Increase in head start funding 'a national priority'
Increased funding for Head Start -- the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States -- is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery. (2020-12-07)

COVID-19 in Victorian schools and childcare mainly driven by community transmission
COVID-19 cases in schools, early childhood education centers and childcare are mainly driven by community transmission. Off-site learning should therefore be a last resort, a new Australian report has found. (2020-12-04)

Gender differences in academic productivity during COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic, most science and medical faculty began working from home, with women reporting a significant decrease in manuscript submissions. Women also report providing 77.6% of the childcare themselves, compared to 61.3% for men, (2020-11-24)

Lack of diversity among cardiovascular health-care professionals continues
Despite working for more than two decades to address underrepresentation of women in cardiology, disparities among cardiovascular professionals continue to exist. Profound inequities also exist for individuals underrepresented in medicine, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans, who constitute 32 percent of the U.S. population but only eight percent of practicing cardiologists (2020-10-13)

'Less pain' to remove tonsils
A 10-year study from Flinders University has found ''shrinking'' tonsils results in far less pain and bleeding than a full tonsillectomy. The research paper, published this month in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, looked at 608 children who underwent tonsil surgery between 2008 and 2018. (2020-10-13)

Unknowns and uncertainties raise ethical concerns for UK egg freezing
A lack of clear, accessible, and transparent data creates a series of ethical issues for egg freezing, according to a new briefing note from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics. (2020-09-29)

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, a new SMU study finds. (2020-09-17)

As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live
COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women. (2020-09-14)

COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
New research from University of Sydney finds COVID-19 transmission rates in NSW schools and early childcare education and care settings were minimal, particularly between children and from children to adults. (2020-08-03)

New guidelines say breastfeeding is safe after anaesthesia
New guidelines published by the Association of Anaesthetists in the journal Anaesthesia, to coincide with the start of World Breast Feeding Week (1-7 August) say that breastfeeding is safe after the mother has had anaesthesia, as soon as she is alert and able to feed. (2020-07-31)

Rethinking women's mental health following partner abuse
When one in six Australian women report experiencing physical and/or sexual violence - and one in four report emotional abuse - by a current or previous cohabiting partner since the age of 15, you know there is a problem. (2020-07-27)

Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds
Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, a new Bocconi University study finds (2020-07-23)

Women's burden increases in COVID-19 era
The triple burden endured by women -- in productive, reproductive and community roles -- has been exposed and intensified due to COVID-19-enforced lockdown and quarantine restrictions. (2020-07-21)

Pandemic disproportionately affects scientists with young children
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a disproportionate, negative impact on the careers of scientists with young children at home, a new survey finds. They have been forced to drastically reduce the amount of time they spend on their research, which could have long-term effects on their careers and could exacerbate existing inequalities. (2020-07-15)

Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don't transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall
Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults. Based on the evidence, the authors recommend that schools reopen in the fall, since staying home can adversely affect children's development. (2020-07-10)

EMBL survey studies effects of COVID-19 pandemic on life scientists
Scientists all over the world experience drawbacks due to the ongoing pandemic -- but there are also advantages. Two group leaders at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory performed a survey among life scientists to learn more about how they deal with the current situation. (2020-06-22)

Female researchers majorly under-represented in COVID-19 research
New research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found significant gender bias in research authorship relating to COVID-19, which means that women's views are not equally shaping the response to the pandemic. (2020-06-11)

Flu vaccine coverage linked to reduced antibiotic prescribing
Researchers at CDDEP, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine assessed the impact of influenza vaccination coverage on state-level antibiotic prescribing rates in the United States between 2010 and 2017. (2020-06-10)

Women's communication shapes division of labor in household
For many couples, COVID-19 quarantine has shattered the normal routine and led some to renegotiate who does what around the house. A new study led a team that analyzed the role that communication plays in the division of household labor. They found that partner communication is the most important factor linking the division of household labor to satisfaction in the relationship. But the way that the partners' communication matters depends on gender. (2020-06-09)

Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports. Additionally, the study provided information about the importance of temperament traits for motor skills. (2020-05-27)

Workers happy despite crisis and uncertainty
In general, workers in Switzerland and Germany are coping well with the COVID-19 crisis and the associated social disruption. They are feeling happier and finding it easier to unwind and balance work and private life. They are also more engaged at work than last year, a survey among 600 participants carried out by researchers of the University of Zurich shows. (2020-05-06)

Millions of US workers at risk of infections on the job
A University of Washington researcher calculates that 14.4 million workers face exposure to infection once a week and 26.7 million at least once a month in the workplace, pointing to an important population needing protection as the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, continues to break out across the US. (2020-04-29)

When what-if scenarios turn real: CSU pandemic modeler providing new COVID-19 insights
School closures are intended to slow the transmission of the coronavirus. But researchers find that the toll school closures take on health care workers could potentially negate any mortality benefits from the closures. (2020-04-03)

The Lancet Public Health: US modelling study estimates impact of school closures for COVID-19 on US health-care workforce and associated mortality
US policymakers considering physical distancing measures to slow the spread of COVID-19 face a difficult trade-off between closing schools to reduce transmission and new cases, and potential health-care worker absenteeism due to additional childcare needs that could ultimately increase mortality from COVID-19, according to new modelling research published in The Lancet Public Health journal. (2020-04-03)

COVID-19 and labour constraints: Recalling former health care workers not enough
While the COVID-19 pandemic has already resulted in mass layoffs in several industries, other essential industries will instead face critical workforce shortages, according to a new report. (2020-04-02)

Support communities key for military wives and partners facing employment and social challenges
Military spouses can struggle to find and maintain employment and face severe restrictions on their social lives because of their partners' working patterns. (2020-03-06)

Depressed, rural moms face greater health challenges--and so do their kids
WSU Research has linked chronic depression with increased health problems for moms and children in poor rural communities, revealing the need for better treatment based on teamwork and trust. (2020-03-06)

Women paid less than men even at highest levels of academic medicine, study finds
Women who chair clinical departments at public medical schools are paid an average of 88 cents for every dollar paid to their male counterparts, or about $70,000 to $80,000 less per year, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and UC San Francisco report. (2020-03-02)

Social factors play a key role in missed well-child care visits
Despite the benefits of well-child care visits (WCV), up to half of WCVs are missed. A team of researchers and pediatricians at Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Washington, and the University of Vermont sought to understand the challenges that prevent families from attending their child's scheduled appointment. (2020-02-18)

Mother nature and child development
A world first review of the importance of nature play could transform children's play spaces, supporting investment in city and urban parks, while also delivering important opportunities for children's physical, social and emotional development. (2020-02-14)

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