Current Childcare News and Events | Page 2

Current Childcare News and Events, Childcare News Articles.
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Texas Tech researcher contributes to 'roadmap' for greater gender equity in academia
The road to gender equality in academia is long, but one Texas Tech University researcher is now part of a nationwide collaboration hoping to shorten the journey by providing a roadmap. Emily Dhurandhar, an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology & Sport Management, is one of the authors of ''Turning chutes into ladders for women faculty: A review and roadmap for equity in academia,'' published today in the Journal of Women's Health. (2020-02-11)

Study: US takes 'low road' to growth with adverse impact on wellbeing, future prosperity
Some countries -- including the United States -- take the low road to economic growth, where growing numbers of women in the workforce may stimulate the economy, but inadequate child care overburdens them, compromises their economic contribution, and threatens the quality of the future labor force, once poorly socialized children reach adulthood. Gender egalitarian high road countries have higher welfare and better prospects for future growth. (2019-12-17)

Caring for a grandchild linked to lower risk of loneliness and social isolation
Caring for a grandchild may be linked to a lower risk of loneliness and social isolation, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-12-17)

Barriers to reintegration lead to poorer health for the formerly incarcerated,
Formerly incarcerated individuals with barriers to re-entry and service needs following their release are subsequently more likely to experience poor physical and mental health, according to an eye-opening new Rutgers University-Camden study. (2019-12-06)

Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China's obesity problem
Educating parents and grandparents -- as well as improving physical activity and the food provided at school -- could hold the key to solving China's obesity pandemic, according to one of the largest trials of childhood obesity prevention in the world. (2019-11-26)

Infant home visiting program linked to less child abuse
Family Connects, a nurse home visiting program for newborns and their parents, is linked to substantial reductions in child maltreatment investigations in children's earliest years, according to new research from Duke University. Program participants had 44 percent lower rates of child maltreatment investigations during children's first 24 months of life, compared with parents who did not receive the program, researchers found. (2019-11-11)

Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias
In a policy paper published in the journal Science, scientists from a variety of fields highlight key ways institutions and funding agencies can help address sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workplace. (2019-11-07)

How Human Population came from our ability to cooperate
Humans' ability to cooperate during child-bearing years by sharing food, labor, and childcare duties is the story of population growth. (2019-11-06)

Screen-based media associated with structural differences in brains of young children
A new study documents structural differences in the brains of preschool-age children related to screen-based media use. (2019-11-04)

Endometriosis may be costing us much more than previously thought
Along with significant physical pain, endometriosis also hurts Australian women at the hip pocket, as well as having significant economic effects on society as a whole, a new study published today in PLOS ONE confirms. (2019-10-10)

Modern family roles improve life satisfaction for parents
Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown. (2019-10-08)

Gendered play in hunter-gatherer children strongly influenced by community demographics
The gendered play of children from 2 hunter-gatherer societies is strongly influenced by the demographics of their communities and the gender roles modelled by the adults around them, a new study finds. (2019-09-26)

Context may explain why dads are happier and less stressed than moms
Dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than moms when taking care of kids, and researchers say these differences may come down to how and when childcare activities are split between parents. (2019-09-23)

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance
Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children. (2019-09-09)

Head start programs alleviate supply gap of center-based childcare in NJ
The availability of Head Start and Early Head Start in New Jersey, federal programs designed to serve low-income families' childcare needs, reduces the likelihood that a community will experience a severe childcare supply gap, a Rutgers-led study found. (2019-08-26)

Wiggling it beats a path for a better performance at school
QUT early childhood researchers develop fun rhythm and movement program to support young children's brains. (2019-08-15)

Screen time no child's play
Experts are urging parents to brush up on national guidelines following a rapid rise in screen time on electronic devices for children under 2. (2019-07-24)

Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills
Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area. On the other hand, children living in the metropolitan area participated the most in organised sports. (2019-06-27)

Fathers aid development of larger brains
The bigger the brain, the more intelligent a mammalian species is. Developing a large brain, though, requires a huge energy input. The females of many large-brained animal species are therefore reliant on the help of other group members to care for their young. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now demonstrated that larger brains particularly develop in animal species in which fathers assist mothers, for only the help of fathers is dependable. (2019-06-03)

Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests
Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women. (2019-05-20)

Postpartum depression: For impoverished mothers of color, it takes a community
Treating postpartum depression (PPD) in low-income mothers of color requires an understanding of each person's lived experience, and practitioners should consider interventions that develop broadly from a community level in order to improve outcomes for their clients, according to a University at Buffalo social work researcher. (2019-05-14)

Call for unis and others to consider women juggling research/childcare
Offering financial aid to cover childcare costs for female academics attending conferences is one of the suggestions offered by QUT researchers who surveyed Australian women on how caring for children has affected their careers. They also recommend institutions and funding bodies that use publication and citation benchmarks as a key criteria for appointment, promotion and the awarding of grants should adjust those to cater for women who have cared for children. (2019-03-29)

Doctor video visits increase access to healthcare but could risk fragmentation
In today's fast-paced digital society, virtual doctor visits are on the rise and offer patients a more convenient way to receive medical care from anywhere. Dr. Winston Liaw from the UH College of Medicine led the first study to examine the relationship between telehealth use and access to primary care. (2019-03-14)

Touch biographies reveal transgenerational nature of touch
The way we feel about being touched -- and the way we touch others -- are shaped by our personal and generational affective history. Touch inequalities, too, are often transmitted through generations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Tampere shows. For the study, the researchers analysed a unique set of data, namely touch biographies. (2019-02-06)

Obesity prevention interventions needed beyond preschool
A Rutgers study has found a need for early childhood obesity prevention interventions beyond preschool education settings. (2019-01-30)

Brits and Germans have very different views on the future of state pensions
Germans think the state always has some role to play in providing state pensions but UK citizens split over how to provide social welfare in the future, according to new research conducted at the University. (2019-01-21)

Over half of UK female surgeons have experience of workplace discrimination, poll suggests
More than half of female surgeons in the UK have faced or witnessed discrimination in the workplace, suggest the results of a confidential online poll, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-01-07)

One in 4 parents not prepared for 'parenting hangovers' this holiday season
A quarter of parents of young children who drink alcohol on special occasions do not think about limiting how much they drink or whether they'll be able to take care of their child the next day, according to a new national poll. (2018-12-17)

How young women view men affects how they imagine their future selves
When young women believe more men are becoming stay-at-home dads, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families. When they don't think men's roles are changing, they are more likely to see themselves as their future families' primary caregivers, researchers found. (2018-12-04)

Baby's first cold can last longer depending on nose-dwelling bacteria
New research on the types of bacteria living in babies' noses could offer clues as to why some recover quickly from their first cough or cold, while others suffer for longer. The study suggests that babies who have a wide variety of different bacteria living in their noses tend to recover more quickly from their first respiratory virus, compared to those who have less variety and more bacteria from either the Moraxellaceae or Streptococcaceae family. (2018-12-02)

When low-income families can meet their basic needs, children are healthier
A series of reports from five cities across the US found that young children and their parents are healthier when they are able to afford basic needs. (2018-11-08)

UCSC chemists develop safe alternatives to phthalates used in plastics
Researchers have developed safer alternatives to the phthalate plasticizers used to enhance the suppleness, flexibility, and longevity of plastics. Phthalates leach out of plastics into food, water, and the environment, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that phthalate exposure can lead to a variety of health problems. The new chemicals are effective as plasticizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) but can't leach out of PVC products because they are chemically bonded to the polymer chain. (2018-10-31)

Supplemental issue honors the life and scholarship of Nobel Laureate Gary S. Becker
A special supplement to the most recent issue of the Journal of Political Economy (JPE) (October 2018) commemorates the life and work of the late Nobel laureate Gary S. Becker. The issue contains contributions from economists such as fellow Nobel laureate and JPE editor James J. Heckman, as well as Richard Blundell, Edward P. Lazear, Pierre-Andre Chiappori, Monica Costa Dias, James Liang, John Eric Humphries, and Gregory Veramendi. The articles in this issue extend, explore, and honor Becker's influential research and scholarship. (2018-10-30)

Nurseries may trump informal or childminder care for kids' psychological development
Attendance at a nursery/crèche staffed by professionals may be linked to better psychological development than being looked after by family/friends or a childminder in early childhood, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2018-10-01)

The glass ceiling: Three reasons why it still exists and is hurting the economy
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds the glass ceiling -- that invisible barrier to advancement that women face at the top levels of the workplace -- remains as intractable as ever and is a drag on the economy. (2018-08-22)

Indian-Americans have fewer sudden infant deaths, Rutgers study finds
Indian-Americans have the highest percentage of sleeping with their babies among ethnic groups in New Jersey but the lowest rate of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), a Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences study shows. Researchers attributed this paradoxical finding to a variety of compensatory factors, including Indian-Americans' practice of placing their infants on their backs to sleep. (2018-08-07)

Many young people don't know when female and male fertility declines, study finds
Most students underestimate the impact of female and male age on fertility, new research published in Human Fertility finds. Less than half could correctly identify the age when a woman's fertility declines and even fewer knew when male fertility declines. (2018-07-30)

A year in words
In a recent study published in the journal PLOS One, Lynn Perry and a team of fellow researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year at the UM Linda Ray Intervention Center found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers. (2018-07-23)

Which strategies help cut consumption of sugary beverages in young children?
An Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies reveals strategies that can successfully reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in young children. (2018-07-18)

Mother's attitude to baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. (2018-06-12)

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