Current Childhood Obesity News and Events

Current Childhood Obesity News and Events, Childhood Obesity News Articles.
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High fructose diets could cause immune system damage
People who consume a diet high in fructose could risk damaging their immune systems. (2021-02-22)

Toddler sleep patterns matter
Lauren Covington, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware School of Nursing, found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily done, especially if a caregiver is the only parent, juggling multiple jobs, parenting multiple children or dealing with a tenuous housing situation. (2021-02-22)

Low-quality maternal diet during pregnancy may be associated with late-childhood obesity
Eating a low quality diet, high in foods and food components associated with chronic inflammation, during pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of obesity and excess body fat in children, especially during late-childhood. The findings are published the open access journal BMC Medicine. (2021-02-21)

Store fat or burn it? Targeting a single protein flips the switch
As obesity becomes a growing issue worldwide - nearly tripling over the last-half century - scientists are trying to gain a better understanding of the condition at the molecular level. Now, new research led by UC San Francisco scientists suggests that a single protein could play an outsize role in weight gain. (2021-02-18)

Body shape, beyond weight, drives fat stigma for women
Fat stigma in women contributes to poor medical outcomes and negatively affects educational and economic opportunities. A new study from scientists at Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University shows that body shape, beyond overall weight, drives fat stigma. Women with overweight and obesity who carry gluteofemoral fat were less stigmatized than those who carry abdominal fat. These findings could affect how interventions for overweight and obesity are designed and delivered. (2021-02-17)

Scientists develop blood test to predict environmental harms to children
Scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health developed a method using a DNA biomarker to easily screen pregnant women for harmful prenatal environmental contaminants like air pollution linked to childhood illness and developmental disorders. This approach has the potential to prevent childhood developmental disorders and chronic illness through the early identification of children at risk. (2021-02-17)

3D microscopy clarifies understanding of body's immune response to obesity
Researchers who focus on fat know that some adipose tissue is more prone to inflammation-related comorbidities than others, but the reasons why are not well understood. Thanks to a new analytical technique, scientists are getting a clearer view of the microenvironments found within adipose tissue associated with obesity. This advance may illuminate why some adipose tissues are more prone to inflammation - leading to diseases like type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disorders - and help direct future drug therapies to treat obesity. (2021-02-17)

Mother's heart health in pregnancy impacts child's heart health in adolescence
A mother's heart health while she is pregnant may have a significant impact on her child's cardiovascular health in early adolescence (ages 10 to 14), according to a new study. It is the first study to examine the implications of a mother's cardiovascular health during pregnancy for offspring health in the longer term. (2021-02-16)

The body produces new satiety factor during prolonged exercise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen confirm that the hormone GDF15 is released in response to vigorous exercise, but likely not in sufficient quantity to affect behavior or appetite. These findings add nuance to a hormone that is currently under scrutiny for its potential as an anti-obesity medication. (2021-02-16)

Identifying risk factors for elevated anxiety in young adults during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study has identified early risk factors that predicted heightened anxiety in young adults during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The findings from the study, supported by the National Institutes of Health and published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, could help predict who is at greatest risk of developing anxiety during stressful life events in early adulthood and inform prevention and intervention efforts. (2021-02-12)

UTEP professor's study may lead to solutions for overeating
The 10-member team made discoveries about a specific area of the brain tied to recollection and the desire to seek and consume food. It could lead to a way to inhibit the desire to overeat. (2021-02-12)

Chinese people may be more susceptible to obesity-related health risks than other racial, ethnic groups
Chinese people are more likely to face high blood pressure and other health risks as a result of higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference than people from other racial and ethnic groups, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-02-11)

Lifestyle changes in pregnant women affected babies' genes
A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden showed a connection between lifestyle intervention in pregnant women with obesity and epigenetic alterations in the baby. The study is published in the journal Diabetes. (2021-02-11)

A study analyses breakfast-related advertising in Mediterranean countries
According to the Breakfast Food Advertisements in Mediterranean Countries: Products' Sugar Content in Adverts from 2015 to 2019 report produced by UOC Faculty of Information and Communication Sciences professor and researcher, Mireia Montaña, the majority of breakfast products marketed for children contain three times as much sugar as those aimed at adults, influencing their choices for one of the most important meals of the day. (2021-02-11)

Obesity contributes to up to half of new diabetes cases annually in the United States
Obesity is linked to 30-53% of new diabetes cases in the U.S. yearly. Obesity has remained a major driver of diabetes for the last two decades. Obesity-related diabetes varies by gender and race/ethnicity, and the greatest impact is among non-Hispanic white females. (2021-02-10)

New targets for the development of a drug treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes
The GIP receptor in the central nervous system plays a crucial role in the regulation of body weight and food intake. This is shown by a recent study by Helmholtz Zentrum München, ETH Zurich and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD). The study, which has now been published in 'Cell Metabolism', identifies new targets for the development of a drug treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes. (2021-02-10)

'Gamechanger' drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20%
One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers. (2021-02-10)

More deaths in England and Scotland may be due to obesity and excess body fat than smoking
Obesity and excess body fat may have contributed to more deaths in England and Scotland than smoking since 2014, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. (2021-02-10)

Traumatic stress in childhood can lead to brain changes in adulthood: study
A new study has shown that traumatic or stressful events in childhood may lead to tiny changes in key brain structures that can now be identified decades later. The study is the first to show that trauma or maltreatment during a child's early years--a well-known risk factor for developing mental health conditions such as major depressive disorder in adulthood--triggers changes in specific subregions of the amygdala and the hippocampus. (2021-02-09)

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems. The best-practice approach, known as the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding, has now been rigorously tested and peer reviewed, resulting in the quantifiable tool sDOR.2-6y. (2021-02-08)

Happy childhood? That's no guarantee for good mental health
It's well understood that a difficult childhood can increase the likelihood of mental illness, but according to new research from the University of South Australia, a happy and secure childhood does not always protect a child from developing a mental illness later in life. (2021-02-07)

Pandemic increases substance abuse, mental health issues for those struggling with obesity
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a detrimental impact on substance use, mental health, and weight-related health behaviors among people with obesity, according to a new study by researchers at UT Southwestern and the UTHealth School of Public Health. (2021-02-05)

Father's early-life exposure to stress associated with child's brain development
The FinnBrain research of the University of Turku has demonstrated for the first time that the stress the father has experienced in his childhood is connected to the development of the white matter tracts in the child's brain. Whether this connection is transmitted through epigenetic inheritance needs further research. (2021-02-04)

School gardens linked with kids eating more vegetables
Getting children to eat their vegetables can seem like an insurmountable task, but nutrition researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found one way: school gardens and lessons on using what's grown in them. Researchers worked with 16 elementary schools across Central Texas to install vegetable gardens and teach classes to students and parents about nutrition and cooking and published the results study in the International Journal for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. (2021-02-04)

Alcohol, calories, and obesity: Could labelling make a difference?
Mandatory calorie labelling of alcoholic drinks could possibly address both alcohol consumption and obesity. An analysis published in Obesity Reviews summaries the results of studies that have examined consumer knowledge of the calorie content of alcoholic drinks, public support for labelling of calorie content on such drinks, and the effect of labelling on consumption. (2021-02-03)

Survival tip: Start at normal weight and slowly add pounds
People who start adulthood with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range and move later in life to being overweight - but never obese - tend to live the longest, a new study suggests. Adults in this category lived longer than even those whose BMI stayed in the normal range throughout their life. Those who started adulthood as obese and continued to add weight had the highest mortality rate. (2021-02-02)

Experts put new method of analysing children's play to the test
How to study the stages children go through as they play together has been highlighted in new research by a Swansea University academic. Dr Pete King, who specialises in play and childhood studies, devised a method of studying the process of children's play - the Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM) - and has now published research which demonstrates how effective it is as an observational tool. (2021-02-01)

New research looks at teen bariatric surgery outcomes by age
Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have found that both younger and older adolescents have similar weight loss, resolution of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, nutritional impacts and improvement in quality of life after bariatric surgery. These results strongly indicate that, when working with adolescents with severe obesity, age alone should not dissuade providers and patients from pursuing surgery when medically indicated. (2021-02-01)

Childhood trauma could affect development, treatment of multiple sclerosis
Childhood trauma could affect the trajectory of multiple sclerosis development and response to treatment in adulthood, a new study in mice found. Mice that had experienced stress when young were more likely to develop the autoimmune disorder and less likely to respond to a common treatment, researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found. However, treatment that activated an immune-cell receptor mitigated the effects of childhood stress in the mice. (2021-01-29)

Americans like sports, but heterosexual men especially do
Nearly nine out of 10 Americans say they enjoy sports at least a little, but heterosexual men more commonly identify as passionate sports fans, a new study suggests. A survey of nearly 4,000 American adults found that only 11% said they did not identify as sports fans at all. Over 40% were passionate fans, identifying themselves as being ''quite a bit'' or ''very much so'' sports fans. (2021-01-29)

Consuming omega-3 fatty acids could prevent asthma
New research suggests that a higher dietary intake of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in childhood may reduce the risk of developing subsequent asthma, but only in children carrying a common gene variant. The study, led by Queen Mary University of London, is in collaboration with the University of Bristol and University of Southampton, UK, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. (2021-01-27)

Losing weight before knee surgery may not be beneficial for people with arthritis: Study
University of Alberta researchers find no evidence that BMI is a good determinant of surgical outcomes for osteoarthritis. (2021-01-27)

Childhood cancer survivors are not more likely to terminate their pregnancies
Study finds they have a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant, however. (2021-01-25)

Dietary adherence and the fight against obesity
While eating less and moving more are the basics of weight control and obesity treatment, finding ways to help people adhere to a weight-loss regimen is more complicated. Understanding what features make a diet easier or more challenging to follow can help optimize and tailor dietary approaches for obesity treatment. (2021-01-25)

Placental function can illuminate future disease in adults and children
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered a direct association between placental function in pregnant women and future metabolic disorders in children and adults, a finding that could lead to earlier intervention and diagnosis of disease. (2021-01-22)

Tough childhood damages life prospects
An adverse upbringing often impairs people's circumstances and health in their adult years, especially for couples who have both had similar experiences. This is shown by a new study, carried out by Uppsala University researchers, in which 818 mothers and their partners filled in a questionnaire one year after having a child together. The study is now published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. (2021-01-21)

Six-fold rise in brain pressure disorder that affects mostly women
A brain pressure disorder that especially affects women, causing severe headaches and sometimes permanent sight loss, has risen six-fold in 15 years, and is linked to obesity and deprivation, a new study by Swansea University researchers has shown. Rates of emergency hospital admissions in Wales for people with the disorder were also five times higher than for those without. (2021-01-21)

The interconnection of global pandemics -- Obesity, impaired metabolic health and COVID-19
In a Nature Reviews Endocrinology article authors from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) highlight the interconnection of #obesity and impaired metabolic health with the severity of #COVID19. #diabetes (2021-01-21)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

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