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Current Chimpanzees News and Events, Chimpanzees News Articles.
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Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans. Scientists now challenge the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique. They found the same asymmetry pattern in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. However, humans were the most variable in this pattern. This suggests that lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities evolved by adapting a presumably ancestral asymmetry pattern. (2020-02-14)

Female chimps with powerful moms are less likely to leave home
In chimp society females leave the nest, while males stay with their parents. But some chimp females seem less willing to cut the apron strings. New findings suggest that while the risks of inbreeding push some females to leave home and start their families elsewhere, the perks of having a powerful mom on hand can make it worthwhile for other females to stay. (2020-01-20)

Glimpses of fatherhood found in non-pair-bonding chimps
Although they have no way of identifying their biological fathers, male chimpanzees form intimate bonds with them, a finding that questions the idea of fatherhood in some of humanity's closest relatives, according to a study of wild chimpanzees in Uganda. (2020-01-15)

The growing pains of orphan chimpanzees
Using long-term behavioral and hormonal data from wild chimpanzees in the Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, researchers from the Taï Chimpanzee Project at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, have revealed that mothers may be shaping pre-adult growth and offspring muscle mass even without direct provisioning. We compared growth of young chimpanzees with a mother until adulthood compared to those who had experienced maternal loss after weaning. (2020-01-07)

Less offspring due to territorial conflicts
Territorial conflicts can turn violent in humans and chimpanzees, two extremely territorial species. An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has studied the effects of territoriality on female reproductive success in wild Western chimpanzees and found that high neighbor pressure at times when females typically reproduce can lead to reproductive delays with longer intervals between births. Having many males in a group, however, is of advantage and speeds up reproduction. (2020-01-03)

Chimpanzees more likely to share tools, teach skills when task is complex
A new study finds that chimpanzees that use a multi-step process and complex tools to gather termites are more likely to share tools with novices. The study helps illuminate chimpanzees' capacity for prosocial -- or helping -- behavior, a quality that has been recognized for its potential role in the evolution of human cultural abilities. (2019-12-23)

How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga
Two chimpanzees housed in a zoo in the US have sparked the question about how human dance evolved after being observed performing a duo dance-like behaviour, similar to a human conga-line. (2019-12-12)

Biology: Genetic 'clock' predicts lifespan in vertebrates
A model that uses genetic markers to accurately estimate the lifespans of different vertebrate species is presented in a study in Scientific Reports this week. The 'lifespan clock' screens 42 selected genes for CpG sites, short pieces of DNA whose density is correlated with lifespan, to predict how long members of a given vertebrate species may live. (2019-12-12)

Fossil suggests apes, old world monkeys moved in opposite directions from shared ancestor
In terms of their body plan, Old World monkeys -- a group that includes primates like baboons and macaques -- are generally considered more similar to ancestral species than apes are. But a new study suggests that as far as locomotion goes, apes and Old World monkeys each evolved a way of moving that was different from the ancestral species as they adapted to different niches in their environments. (2019-11-08)

Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species
Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say. (2019-10-31)

Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet
Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives. But major differences can be found in our saliva, according to new research by scientists at the Forsyth Institute and the University of Buffalo. (2019-10-31)

Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. If those samples are not available in one place, research institutions can support each other. This is the rationale behind ManyPrimates, a project that aims to establish a culture of global collaboration in primate cognition research. It was set up by researchers from the Leipzig Research Center for Early Childhood Development (LFE) at Leipzig University, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and Zoo Leipzig. (2019-10-29)

Lend me a flipper
Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. Utilizing a simplified Hirata Task, the team found that dolphins coordinated their behavior to work together on a shared task. Specifically, the 'initiator' would wait on their partner and the 'follower' would coordinate their swimming speed to match the initiator's behavior. (2019-10-28)

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes
University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates. (2019-10-16)

The brain does not follow the head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. This has to do, among other things, with the evolution of novel brain structures that enabled complex behaviors such as language and tool production. A study by anthropologists at the University of Zurich now shows that changes in the brain occurred independent of evolutionary rearrangements of the braincase. (2019-10-15)

New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome
A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees. (2019-10-07)

Living a long chimpanzee life
Researchers from Kyoto University report on the average life expectancy of chimpanzees in Japan. The average life expectancy of chimpanzees who reach adulthood -- reported as 12-years-old in the paper -- is 40 years: 41.5 years for males and 39.2 years for females. (2019-10-03)

Improved mapping of Swedish genes
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known. This is indicated in a genetic mapping of one thousand Swedish individuals, where new DNA sequences that should be included in the reference genome have been identified. The study is published today in the scientific journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2019-09-24)

Improved mapping of Swedish genes from 1,000 individuals
People -- or more specifically just Swedes -- are more like chimpanzees than previously known. This is indicated in a genetic mapping of one thousand Swedish individuals, where new DNA sequences that should be included in the reference genome have been identified. (2019-09-24)

Taking evolution to heart
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease--one of the most common causes of illness and death in the developed world. (2019-09-16)

Study finds human hearts evolved for endurance
Major physical changes occurred in the human heart as people shifted from hunting and foraging to farming and modern life. As a result, human hearts are now less 'ape-like' and better suited to endurance types of activity. (2019-09-16)

NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)

Artificial intelligence used to recognize primate faces in the wild
Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed new artificial intelligence software to recognize and track the faces of individual chimpanzees in the wild. The new software will allow researchers and wildlife conservationists to significantly cut back on time and resources spent analyzing video footage, according to the new paper published today in Science Advances. (2019-09-04)

First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)

How humans and chimpanzees travel towards a goal in rainforests
How do human-unique ranging styles, like large home range and trail use, influence the way we travel to our goals? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, investigated spatial movement patterns of the Mbendjele BaYaka people and Taï chimpanzees. Human foragers and chimpanzees travelled in similarly straight lines towards goals, but they showed clearly different patterns in how they change linearity and speed depending on group size and familiarity with an area. (2019-07-30)

Chimpanzees' working memory similar to ours
Working memory is central to our mental lives; we use it to add up the cost of our shopping or to remember the beginning of this sentence at its end. Some scientists argue it is particularly developed in humans, but how do chimpanzees, one of our closest relatives, compare? Researchers from the University of St. Andrews, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna set out to answer this question. (2019-07-23)

Flies may also spread disease among monkeys and apes
People the world over have a good sense that we do not want flies landing on our food. Research has justified that disgust, showing that flies associated with humans and their livestock spread a diversity of pathogens. Researchers of the Robert Koch Institute and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have now shown that such fly associations also exist in highly mobile non-human primate groups as they move kilometers every day through the rainforest. (2019-07-16)

Scientists identified the metabolic features specific to the autistic brain
Skoltech scientists looked into the differences in the concentrations of multiple metabolites in healthy humans and individuals suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), gaining a deeper insight into the molecular processes that take place in the brain of autistic individuals. The results of the study were published in Nature's ?ommunications Biology journal. (2019-07-16)

Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes
A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) -- which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) -- are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances. (2019-07-15)

Research identifies key driver for infanticide among chimpanzees
Study concludes that the sexual selection hypothesis was the main reason for the high rates of infanticide among a community of chimpanzees in Uganda. (2019-06-13)

Bees can link symbols to numbers: Study
We know bees get the concept of zero and can do basic math. Now researchers have discovered they may also be capable of connecting symbols to numbers. It's a finding that sheds new light on how numerical abilities may have evolved over millennia and even opens new possibilities for communication between humans and other species. (2019-06-04)

Chimps caught crabbing
Kyoto University researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. The paper describes how this is a potential clue in explaining how our primarily fruit-eating ancestors began eating aquatic life, and supplementing their diet with nutrients critical for brain development. (2019-05-29)

Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. (2019-05-29)

Tortoises on the menu
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück, Germany, have observed wild chimpanzees in the Loango National Park, Gabon, eating tortoises. They describe the first observations of this potentially cultural behavior where chimpanzees hit tortoises against tree trunks until the tortoises' shells break open and then feed on the meat. (2019-05-23)

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas
Chimpanzees at the crossroads: how they adapt to living outside protected areas Research carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways -- including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats -- but their survival is still threatened. (2019-05-22)

Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate
Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. From physically preventing other males from mating to bringing their sons in close proximity to ovulating females, bonobo moms bring new meaning to the notion of being overbearing -- but in so doing, they increase their sons' chance of fatherhood three-fold. (2019-05-20)

Bonobo mothers help their sons to have more offspring
In many social animal species individuals share child-rearing duties, but new research from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, finds that bonobo mothers go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. This way bonobo mothers increase their sons' chance of fatherhood three-fold. (2019-05-20)

Captive chimpanzees spontaneously use tools to excavate underground food
Chimpanzees in captivity can successfully work out how to use tools to excavate underground food, even if they've never been presented with an underground food scenario before, according to a study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alba Motes-Rodrigo and colleagues and directed by Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar from the University of Oslo. (2019-05-15)

A case of the chimp sniffles or major outbreak? Syndromic surveillance may hold the key
Two sniffling chimps could be one too many for a wild chimpanzee community susceptible to respiratory disease outbreaks, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Minnesota. The team's findings were a result of their development of a syndromic surveillance system to noninvasively and preemptively detect a potential outbreak of respiratory disease. The study recently was published in Ecohealth. (2019-05-10)

Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism. (2019-04-30)

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