Current Chlamydia News and Events

Current Chlamydia News and Events, Chlamydia News Articles.
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At-home swabs diagnose infections as accurately as healthcare worker-collected swabs
Self swabs and caregiver swabs are effective at detecting multiple pathogens and are just as accurate as those taken by healthcare workers, according to a team of Australian researchers. The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2021-01-28)

Study suggests reporting of sexually transmitted infections may be impacted by COVID-19
With the health care community heavily focused on COVID-19 since the first quarter of 2020, there have been concerns that reporting of other diseases -- and the resulting data that enables them to be more effectively treated and controlled -- may have been impacted. For example, little is known about how the pandemic may have affected the reporting of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (2020-12-15)

A new era is dawning in diagnosing sexually transmitted infections in men
Researchers and doctors from the University of Tartu and Tartu University Hospital evaluated the use of a novel revolutionary method, flow cytometry, for diagnosing urethritis in Estonian men. The study published in PLOS ONE confirmed the efficiency of the method and showed that most often urethritis was due to chlamydia. Gonorrhoea caused the strongest urethral inflammation. (2020-12-03)

Cell membranes in super resolution
For the first time ever, expansion microscopy allows the imaging of even the finest details of cell membranes. This offers new insights into bacterial and viral infection processes. (2020-12-02)

Physician advocates screening teen emergency room patients for sexually transmitted infections
Of the 20 million cases of sexually transmitted infections each year 10 million occur among adolescents and young adults. Screening teens and young patients who visit the emergency room for other acute care issues for sexually transmitted infections can help combat future health complications. (2020-11-04)

Penis microbiota predicts if a man's female partner will develop bacterial vaginosis
Penile microbiome composition can vary; however, the presence of some bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria correlates with bacterial vaginosis onset in their female partners. Results highlight 10 bacteria that could be used to accurately predict bacterial vaginosis incidence in women. The study suggests that treatment manipulating the penile microbiome may reduce BV incidence in sex partners. (2020-08-04)

Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. Würzburg researchers have clarified how the pathogenic bacteria obtain this substance. (2020-08-03)

One in five Georgian Londoners had syphilis by their mid-30s
250 years ago, over one-fifth of Londoners had contracted syphilis by their 35th birthday, historians have calculated. (2020-07-06)

UMN report shows sexually transmitted infections continue to rise among MN youth
The 2020 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) reports that while pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline to historic lows for 15 to 19-year-olds, Minnesota youth are contracting sexually transmitted infections (STI) at alarmingly high rates. (2020-06-22)

Chlamydia build their own entrance into human cells
Chlamydia, a type of pathogenic bacteria, need to penetrate human cells in order to multiply. Researchers from Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) have now identified the bacterial protein SemC, which is secreted into the cell and restructures the cell membrane at the entry site. SemC forces the cell's own protein SNX9 to assist it in this process. (2020-03-05)

Shale drilling activity linked to increased sexually transmitted infections in Texas, Yale study
Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that rates of two sexually transmitted infections (STIs), gonorrhea and chlamydia, are 15% and 10% higher, respectively, in Texas counties with high shale drilling activity (''fracking''), compared to counties without any fracking. (2020-02-13)

Targeted gene modification in animal pathogenic chlamydia
Researchers at Umeå University (Sweden), in collaboration with researchers at the University of Maryland and Duke University (USA), now for the first time successfully performed targeted gene mutation in the zoonotic pathogen Chlamydia caviae. (2019-11-07)

How Chlamydia gain access to human cells
Infection biologists at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and the University of Freiburg have found out how the LIPP protein discovered in Düsseldorf helps Chlamydia to infect human cells. These insights could provide the basis for prevention of chlamydial infections. The research was partially funded by the Jürgen Manchot Foundation and was published in the journal Nature Communications on 11 October. (2019-10-30)

Syphilis infection rates in dialysis patients exceed general population
Syphilis rates, like other sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States, are soaring, and the first known study to examine syphilis rates in patients with kidney failure found an incidence greater than three times that of the general population. Neurosyphilis was the second most common syphilis type they found, investigators report in the Clinical Kidney Journal. (2019-10-16)

Sperm and egg cell 'immune response' protects koala DNA
Discovery of a type of immunity that protects koalas' DNA from viruses has importance for the survival of koalas and our fundamental understanding of evolution. A team of scientists from The University of Queensland and University of Massachusetts Medical School are studying tissue samples from koalas to understand how a unique type of cell responds to retrovirus infections, which cause diseases such as chlamydia and cancer. (2019-10-14)

Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host
A recent paper by a team of molecular biologists headquartered at the University of Kansas pinpointed a gene that allows chlamydia to take up DNA from its host environment. (2019-10-10)

Chlamydia in testicular tissue linked to male infertility
The potential impact of undiagnosed sexually transmitted chlamydia infection on men's fertility has been highlighted in a study led by scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), which for the first time found chlamydia in the testicular tissue biopsies of infertile men whose infertility had no identified cause. (2019-10-09)

NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections
Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. Globally, more than one million new STI cases are diagnosed each day. In a new article in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, suggest that the biomedical research community must refocus its commitment to STI research to surmount this growing global health crisis. (2019-09-09)

Study: no link between 'extreme' personal grooming, STDs
Women who choose to shave or wax their pubic hair might not be raising their risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) after all, according to a new study that found no connection between 'extreme' grooming and chlamydia or gonorrhea. (2019-09-04)

New rapid DNA test to diagnose chlamydia infection in koalas
A new DNA test to detect chlamydia infection in koalas which gives on-the-spot results within 30 minutes has been developed in a collaboration between researchers in Brisbane, Australia. (2019-08-20)

Researchers identify how vaginal microbiome can elicit resistance to chlamydia
The vaginal microbiome is believed to protect women against Chlamydia trachomatis, the etiological agent of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in developed countries. New research by the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) shows how the microbiome can either protect or make a woman more susceptible to these serious infections. (2019-08-13)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: First ever phase 1 trial of genital chlamydia vaccine finds it is safe and provokes immune response
The first ever chlamydia vaccine to reach phase 1 clinical trial has been found to be safe and able to provoke an immune response, according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. The randomised controlled trial of 35 healthy women demonstrates promising early signs of what could be an effective vaccine, but further trials are required to determine whether the immune response it provokes effectively protects against chlamydia infection. (2019-08-12)

Last chlamydia-free koala population may safeguard future of species
The last, large, isolated, healthy chlamydia-free population of koalas in Australia may have been identified on Kangaroo Island, said Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Adelaide. (2019-07-02)

The key to unlock bacterial fusion
Researchers identify how a Chlamydia-produced protein helps bacterial compartments fuse together, thus increasing pathogenicity. (2019-06-21)

Certain antidepressants could provide treatment for multiple infectious diseases
Some antidepressants could potentially be used to treat a wide range of diseases caused by bacteria living within cells, according to work by researchers in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine and collaborators at other institutions. (2019-05-31)

LSU health research finds new RX target for common STD
Research led by Ashok Aiyar, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has identified a target that may lead to the development of new treatments for the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. (2019-05-30)

Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with STIs in emergency departments fill scripts
Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections in the emergency department fill prescriptions for antimicrobial therapy to treat these conditions, according to a research letter published online May 28, 2019, by JAMA Pediatrics. (2019-05-28)

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'
Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS). This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development. (2019-04-29)

Gonorrhoea cases on the rise across Europe
Following a decline in notification rates in 2016, the number of gonorrhoea cases has gone up by 17% across the reporting EU/EEA countries with more than 89,000 confirmed diagnoses in 2017 -- equivalent to 240 cases a day. (2019-04-25)

Study reports on bacterial STIs among men using PrEP
This study, which included nearly 3,000 mostly gay and bisexual men in Australia who received daily HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), reports on the association of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by describing diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis among the men and behavioral risk factors. (2019-04-09)

Epidemiological model lends insight to chlamydia outbreak in Japan
Mathematical models that quantify the dynamics of infectious diseases are crucial predictive tools for the control of ongoing and future outbreaks. In an article publishing on Feb. 19 in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, a publication of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Toshikazu Kuniya studies the global behavior of a multi-group SIR epidemic model with age structure and uses the model to estimate the basic reproduction number for Japan's chlamydia outbreak. (2019-02-19)

Do we have an epidemic? Enhancing disease surveillance using a health information exchange
While disease surveillance has shifted toward greater use of electronically transmitted information to decrease the reporting burden on physicians, the challenge of getting the right information to public health officials at the right time has not been completely solved. At HIMSS19, Brian Dixon, Ph.D., of Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, outlines how using a health exchange network can facilitate electronic disease reporting. (2019-02-11)

Researchers find new treatment for Chlamydia
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new way to prevent and treat Chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world. (2019-02-06)

Study finds correlation between eviction rates in the US and high number of STIs
A study by researchers from Yale University and American University outlines a correlation between America's eviction crisis and the high rate of sexually transmitted infections in the United States. (2019-01-23)

Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm
Multiple miscarriages may be linked to the poor quality of a man's sperm, suggests new research. (2019-01-04)

Pay-it-forward model increases STD testing among gay men in China
Chinese gay men who were offered a free STD test and then asked to donate to the testing of another man were 48 percent more likely to get tested than men offered the standard of care, UNC researchers found. Learn how this approach could be applied for testing of other diseases. (2018-12-20)

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein
When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, enters a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself. Inside this makeshift fortress, the bug grows and reproduces, eventually bursting out in search of a new target and killing the host cell. While scientists have known for years that Chlamydia protects itself in this way, they were missing the mechanics until now. (2018-11-07)

Undiagnosed STIs can increase negative PMS symptoms
Women that have undiagnosed sexually transmitted infections may be at greater risk of experiencing negative premenstrual symptoms (PMS), according to new Oxford University research. The study was conducted as part of a long term partnership with the female health, fertility and period-tracking app, CLUE. The findings, published in Evolution Medicine & Public Health, suggest that the presence of an undiagnosed STI might aggravate the negative premenstrual experience. (2018-09-17)

Viruses under the microscope
Human herpesviruses such as HHV-6 can remain dormant in cells for many years without being noticed. When reactivated, they can cause serious clinical conditions. Researchers from Würzburg have now found a way of differentiating between active and inactive viruses. (2018-09-14)

With STDs at an all-time high, why aren't more people getting a proven treatment?
Nearly 2.3 million times last year, Americans learned they had a sexually transmitted disease. But despite these record-high infection rates for chlamydia and gonorrhea, most patients only receive treatment for their own infection -- when they probably could get antibiotics or a prescription for their partner at the same time. A team of physicians looks at the barriers that stand in the way of getting expedited partner therapy to more people. (2018-09-12)

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