Current Choice News and Events

Current Choice News and Events, Choice News Articles.
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Perception critical to women's breast reconstruction decision making
Women who undergo surgical treatment for breast cancer often also have reconstructive surgery but new research from QUT in Australia reveals many feel left out of the decision making process. Approximately one in every three women surveyed stated their surgeon had more input than they did. (2021-02-18)

Army researchers expand study of ethics, artificial intelligence
The Army of the future will involve humans and autonomous machines working together to accomplish the mission. According to Army researchers, this vision will only succeed if artificial intelligence is perceived to be ethical. (2021-02-16)

Computer love
In your quest for true love and that elusive happily ever after, are you waiting for the ''right'' person to come along, or do you find yourself going for the cutest guy or girl in the room, hoping things will work out? Do you leave your options open, hoping to ''trade-up'' at the next opportunity, or do you invest in your relationship with an eye on the cost-benefits analysis? (2021-02-12)

The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but University at Buffalo research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them. (2021-02-03)

How dietary choice influences lifespan in fruit flies
Having a choice of foods may accelerate aging and shorten the lifespan of fruit flies, according to a study published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2021-01-19)

More women embracing 'going flat' after mastectomy
A growing number of women forgoing reconstruction after a mastectomy say they're satisfied with their choice, even as some did not feel supported by their physician, according to a study led by researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. (2021-01-04)

Citizens versus the internet: Confronting digital challenges with cognitive tools
In the latest issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a team of researchers recommend ways that psychological and behavioral sciences can help decrease the negative consequences of Internet use. These recommendations emphasize helping people gain greater control over their digital environments. (2020-12-21)

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater. Through an experiment involving 222 individual tests each consisting of more than 40 questions, Chadd's research revealed that decisions made in an environment of irrelevant information carry time, cognitive, and consequence costs. (2020-12-14)

Energy-efficient magnetic RAM: A new building block for spintronic technologies
Researchers demonstrate a new way to enhance the energy efficiency of the non-volatile magnetic memory. (2020-12-10)

How do we separate the factual from the possible? New research shows how our brain responds to both
Our brains respond to language expressing facts differently than they do to words conveying possibility, a team of neuroscientists has found. Its work offers new insights into the impact word choice has on how we make distinctions between what's real vs. what's merely possible. (2020-12-07)

Increased school choice linked to better mental health for students
Allowing families to choose schools that are more suited to their children may play a key role in improving student mental health, including reducing adolescent suicide rates, suggests new research published in the peer-reviewed journal School Effectiveness and School Improvement. (2020-12-03)

Loyal couples in the rainforest
Coppery titi monkeys do not deceive their partners (2020-11-23)

Measuring risk-taking - by watching people move computer mouses
How you move a computer mouse while deciding whether to click on a risky bet or a safe choice may reveal how much of a risk-taker you really are. Researchers found that people whose mouse drifted toward the safe option on the computer screen - even when they ended up taking the risky bet - may be more risk-averse than their choice would indicate. (2020-11-23)

Healthy food labels that work and don't work
A Duke-NUS Medical School study finds that new labels may be needed to help consumers make healthier food purchases. (2020-11-17)

Making the best decision: Math shows diverse thinkers equal better results
A Florida State University researcher found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers. (2020-11-16)

Dogs are sensitive to their owners' choice despite their own preference
Inspired by work on infants, researchers investigated whether dogs' behaviors are guided by human displays of preference or by the animals' own choices. They found that dogs' looking times, but not fetching behavior, were influenced by the owner's expression of preference. Although the studies did not demonstrate that dogs override their own preferences for an object, the results suggested that the owners' expressed preference was perceived by the dogs and guided their perceptual focus. (2020-11-12)

New insight into how brain neurons influence choices
By studying animals choosing between two drink options, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the activity of certain neurons in the brain leads directly to the choice of one option over another. The findings could lead to better understanding of how decision-making goes wrong in conditions such as addiction and depression. (2020-11-02)

Yes or No: Forcing a choice increased statin prescribing for heart disease patients
Adding an 'active choice' nudge to the electronic health record increased statin prescribing for patients with heart disease, but not for those 'at-risk'. (2020-10-07)

Evolution: Shifts in mating preference
In their efforts to identify the genetic basis for differences in mate choice that keep two co-existing species of butterfly separate, evolutionary biologists at Ludwig-Maximlians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have identified five candidate genes that are associated with divergence in visual mating preferences. (2020-10-06)

Babies' random choices become their preferences
When a baby reaches for one stuffed animal in a room filled with others just like it, that random choice is very bad news for those unpicked toys: the baby has likely just decided she doesn't like what she didn't choose. Researchers have known that adults build unconscious biases over a lifetime of choosing between things that are essentially the same, but finding that even babies do it demonstrates this way of justifying choice is fundamental to the human experience. (2020-10-02)

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows
People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows. (2020-09-10)

How your BMI might affect your spontaneous food purchases
The degree to which spontaneous food purchases divert/attract attention may be related to your weight and the energy density of the food, according to a small, preliminary study using mobile eye-tracking technology to provide real information about consumers' food choice behaviour. The study is presented at this year's European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020). (2020-09-02)

The effect of military training on the sense of agency and outcome processing
A collaborative study between researchers from the Université libre de Bruxelles (Belgium), the Royal Military Academy of Belgium , found that working in a highly hierarchical environment such as the military is detrimental for the sense of agency and for the neural processing of outcomes of one's own actions. Yet, groups undergoing specific training targeting responsibility and accountability, such as military officers, did not show this effect. This research opens up the interesting possibility of training people to develop a sense of responsibility (2020-09-01)

New research contradicts claims that Asian American students are harmed when they cannot attend their first-choice university
A new study finds evidence that contradicts claims in legal complaints to the U.S. Department of Justice arguing that Asian American students face negative consequences while in college as a result of not being admitted to and not attending their first-choice institution. These complaints led to the Trump administration launching formal investigations into the race-conscious admissions practices of Harvard and Yale universities. The findings were published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-08-24)

When learning on your own is not enough
We make decisions based on not only our own learning experience, but also learning from others. Is social learning processed differently from direct learning? In a new study, published in ''Science Advances'', neuroscientist Lei Zhang of the University of Vienna provides empirical evidence that there are parallel computations for direct and social learning and they are carried out in distinct but interacting regions in the brain. (2020-08-20)

Young children would rather explore than get rewards
Young children will pass up rewards they know they can collect to explore other options, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when adults and 4- to 5-year-old children played a game where certain choices earned them rewards, both adults and children quickly learned what choices would give them the biggest returns. But while adults then used that knowledge to maximize their prizes, children continued exploring the other options. (2020-08-12)

Promises found to reduce cheating in large study of adolescents
New research has found that adolescents who promised to be truthful were less likely to 'cheat' than those who did not, even when they could not be found out. (2020-08-03)

Leaving money on the table to stay in the game
Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt -- there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. This can lead to seemingly irrational economic choices that suddenly make sense when viewed as a multiplicative, evolutionary process. (2020-07-27)

Dopamine neurons mull over your options
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have found that dopamine neurons in the brain can represent the decision-making process when making economic choices. As monkeys contemplated whether or not to choose an item, a subset of dopamine neurons transitioned from indicating the item's value to indicating the monkey's ultimate decision. Encoding of the decision into these dopamine neurons happened earlier than it did in other parts of the brain related to economic decision-making. (2020-07-07)

More than medicine: Pain-relief drug delivers choices for mothers in labor
Choice and control are important factors for ensuring a positive childbirth experience, yet until recently, little was known about the impact of alternative administrations of fentanyl -- one of the pain relief drugs used during labour- on both mother and baby. (2020-06-30)

'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain
Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain. (2020-06-25)

How sexual competition and choice could protect species from extinction
New research shows that removing sexual competition and choice through enforced monogamy creates populations that are less resilient to environmental stress, such as climate change. The research team looked at how flour beetles coped with environmental and genetic stress after they had evolved under monogamous versus polyandrous mating patterns. The researchers say that their findings should apply to any species that reproduces sexually, experiences some degree of sexual selection, and faces environmental stress. (2020-06-18)

Secondary school admissions system is still a work in progress
A new study by Lancaster University Management School highlights important inequalities in access to chosen secondary schools in England with minority ethnic families 17% less likely to achieve their first choice school. Experts also say while allowing fewer choices enables local authorities to show that high proportions of children will be attending their first choice school, this is a hollow achievement when results show parents' first choices are not always true preferences. (2020-06-10)

Strong convictions can blind us to information that challenges them
When people are highly confident in a decision, they take in information that confirms their decision, but fail to process information which contradicts it, finds a UCL brain imaging study, published in Nature Communications. (2020-05-27)

Women almost twice as likely to choose primary care as men
Analysis of osteopathic medical school survey data reveals women are 1.75 times more likely to choose primary care than men, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Researchers sought to understand factors that increase the likelihood of specializing in primary care. (2020-05-26)

Grasshoppers are perfectly aware of their own coloration when trying to camouflage
A research team from the Pablo de Olavide University of Seville, led by Pim Edelaar, has carried out an experimental study that shows that grasshoppers are perfectly aware of their own colouration when choosing the place that provides them with better camouflage. The research findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, show how organisms are able to adjust their environment, each according to their individual needs. (2020-05-20)

COVID-19: UW study reports 'staggering' death rate in US among those infected who show symptoms
New study finds the national rate of death among people infected with the novel coronavirus -- SARS-CoV-2 -- that causes COVID-19 and who show symptoms is 1.3%, the study found. The comparable rate of death for the seasonal flu is 0.1%. (2020-05-18)

People may know the best decision -- and not make it
When faced with a decision, people may know which choice gives them the best chance of success, but still take the other option, a new study suggests. People may choose based on a ''gut feeling'', a habit, or what worked for them last time, rather than on what they have learned will work most often, (2020-04-20)

Experiences of undesired effects of hormonal contraception
A study of women who experienced mental ill-health from a hormonal contraception indicates they value their mental well-being higher than a satisfactory sex life. Their experiences can influence their choice of contraception. This is one of four themes that researchers have identified in interviews with 24 women who experience negative effects of some hormonal contraception. The study, from Linköping University in Sweden, has been published in the European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. (2020-03-31)

Our brains are powerful -- but secretive -- forecasters of video virality
Our brains can predict the popularity of online videos, without us even knowing it. (2020-03-09)

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