Current Cholera News and Events

Current Cholera News and Events, Cholera News Articles.
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Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed
Scientists have discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Scientists reach new milestone in vaccine development for leishmaniasis
Researchers have taken an important step forward in developing a controlled human infection model to test leishmaniasis vaccines. (2021-01-11)

Researchers track and analyze smallpox epidemics over three centuries
Researchers from McMaster University have studied and analyzed thousands of weekly records documenting the deaths of smallpox victims in London, England over the span of nearly 300 years. The analysis provides new and rare insights into the ecology of infectious disease, establishing that the time between epidemics, the size of the outbreaks, and even the season when the epidemics occurred, changed over the centuries. (2020-12-21)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics
Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most commonly used. Scientists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany have discovered a molecule that influences the antibiotic-resistance of cholera bacteria. They have published their results in the scientific journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-11-27)

Oxford University podcast returns with season on the History of Pandemics
The University of Oxford's CASE Gold Award winning podcast, Futuremakers, will return for its third season at the end of October. (2020-11-27)

Potential cholera vaccine target discovered
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed antibodies recovered from humans who survived cholera. Experiments showed that the antibodies block V. cholerae bacteria's motility. (2020-11-17)

Cause of 1990s Argentina cholera epidemic uncovered
The evolution of epidemic and endemic strains of the cholera-causing bacterium Vibrio cholerae in Argentina has been mapped in detail. The researchers used whole genome sequencing to study the bacteria circulating during the 1991-1998 outbreak of cholera in the country. Published in Nature Communications, the data have influenced health policy in Argentina, where whole-genome sequencing is now used to distinguish between pandemic and non-pandemic lineages of V. cholerae bacteria. (2020-10-01)

Warning: Epidemics are often followed by unrest
History teaches that social tension accumulated over an epidemic can lead to significant episodes of rebellion, according to a study. (2020-09-07)

COVID-19: Cuba offers UK salutary lesson in 'shoe-leather' epidemiology
Cuba's successful containment of COVID-19 through door-to-door screening of every home in the country, shows how 'shoe-leather' epidemiology could have averted the dramatic failure of the UK's response to the pandemic. In Cuba there have been 2,173 confirmed cases and 83 deaths, with no reported deaths throughout the first week in June, 2020. (2020-07-14)

Microbiome confers resistance to cholera
Many parts of the world are in the midst of a deadly pandemic of cholera, an extreme form of watery diarrhea. UC Riverside scientists have discovered specific gut bacteria make some people resistant to it -- a finding that could save lives. (2020-06-29)

Intensive farming increases risk of epidemics, warn scientists
Overuse of antibiotics, high animal numbers and low genetic diversity from intensive farming increase the risk of animal pathogens transferring to humans. (2020-05-04)

Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria easily pass through such a filter. A new study goes a long way toward explaining the hyperinfectivity of cholera biofilms. (2020-04-20)

COVID-19 -- Impact of containment measures in Italy: 200,000 hospitalizations avoided in March
Since the beginning of the epidemic until March 25, the mobility restrictions implemented by the Italian government have avoided at least 200,000 hospitalizations and reduced the contagion transmission by 45% according to a study accepted for publication in the renowned journal PNAS, coauthored by a group of Italian scientists belonging to Politecnico di Milano, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, University of Zurich, EPFL Lausanne, and Università di Padova. (2020-04-16)

Gene regulatory factors enable bacteria to kill rivals and establish symbiosis in a squid
Two factors that control the expression of a key gene required by luminescent bacteria to kill competing bacterial cells have been identified. (2020-03-06)

What's in your water?
Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his collaborators from the University of California, Berkeley and Switzerland. (2020-01-28)

Consuming cholera toxin counteracts age-associated obesity
Here the research team tested a safe and well-established microbe-based immune adjuvant to restore immune homeostasis and counteract inflammation-associated obesity in animal models. (2019-11-19)

The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer. (2019-10-07)

Protozoans and pathogens make for an infectious mix
The new observation that strains of V. cholerae can be expelled into the environment after being ingested by protozoa, and that these bacteria are then primed for colonisation and infection in humans, could help explain why cholera is so persistent in aquatic environments. The disease-causing bacteria are protected in the protozoan gut and ejected into the environment in membrane-bound expelled food vacuoles (EFVs). (2019-10-01)

Research on cholera adds to understanding of the social life of bacteria
Strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae transform themselves from small, comma-shaped cells to long filaments in nutrient-poor environments to aid short-term survival. (2019-08-09)

New study unravels protection mechanism in bacteria
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have shed fresh light on the mechanism used by certain types of bacteria to protect themselves against attack. (2019-07-03)

Ocean swimming alters skin microbiome, increasing vulnerability to infection
Swimming in the ocean alters the skin microbiome and may increase the likelihood of infection, according to research presented at ASM Microbe 2019, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. (2019-06-22)

Locally-based Haitian social entrepreneurs empower disaster-stricken villages
The Academy of Management Journal has just published a paper titled Collective emotions in institutional creation work, which has been produced at Aalto University School of Business in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The paper addresses the often overlooked issue of how communities rebuild long after the NGOs have moved onto the next disaster. (2019-06-18)

The cholera bacterium's 3-in-1 toolkit for life in the ocean
The cholera bacterium uses a grappling hook-like appendage to take up DNA, bind to nutritious surfaces and recognize 'family' members, EPFL scientists have found. These discoveries will advance our understanding of how the bacterium that causes cholera adapts and survives in its natural environment. (2019-06-10)

Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped
The oldest publicly available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time. The bacterium was isolated from a British soldier during World War One (WWI) and stored for over 100 years before being revived and sequenced. The results show that this strain is a unique, non-toxigenic strain of V. cholerae that's distantly related to the strains of bacteria causing cholera pandemics today and in the past. (2019-04-09)

Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive
When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails. (2019-03-19)

Vaccine study confirms sensitivity of cholera test
Recently, the sensitivity of fecal microbiological cultures for detecting cholera has come under question. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases investigated this claim using a 'vaccine probe' analysis of a completed cholera vaccine cluster randomized trial to support the sensitivity of conventional microbiological culture for cholera. (2019-03-14)

2015-2016 El Niño triggered disease outbreaks across globe
The 2015-2016 El Niño event brought weather conditions that triggered regional disease outbreaks throughout the world, according to a new NASA study. (2019-02-28)

Tracking cholera in a drop of blood
A multi-institutional, international team of researchers has developed a method that identifies individuals recently infected with Vibrio cholerae O1. The results of the study are available online in the February 20 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine. (2019-02-20)

New tool for tracking cholera outbreaks could make it easier to detect deadly epidemics
Algorithms using data from antibody signatures in peoples' blood may enable scientists to assess the size of cholera outbreaks and identify hotspots of cholera transmission more accurately than ever, according to a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-02-20)

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene
A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene. (2019-02-19)

Suicide system in tuberculosis bacteria might hold key to treatment
Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the top ten causes of death worldwide. The genome of the bacterium that causes TB holds a special toxin-antitoxin system with spectacular action: once the toxin is activated, all bacterial cells die, stopping the disease. An international research team co-led by the Wilmanns group at EMBL in Hamburg investigated this promising feature for therapeutic targets. They now share the first high-resolution details of the system in Molecular Cell. (2019-02-18)

Mystery of Yemen cholera epidemic solved
The most likely source of the cholera epidemic in Yemen has been discovered by scientists. Through the use of genomic sequencing, scientists estimate the strain of cholera causing the current outbreak in Yemen -- the worst cholera outbreak in recorded history -- came from Eastern Africa and entered Yemen with the migration of people in and out of the region. Genomics can enable researchers to estimate the risk of future cholera outbreaks and help better target interventions. (2019-01-02)

Biologists turn eavesdropping viruses into bacterial assassins
Molecular biologist Bonnie Bassler and graduate student Justin Silpe found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations -- and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera. (2018-12-13)

Lack of preparedness and insecurity hampered response to cholera epidemic in Yemen
Analysis by researchers at Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health identifies 20 top recommendations to mitigate future cholera outbreaks in Yemen and other humanitarian emergencies, including call for end of attacks on health, water and sanitation infrastructure. (2018-12-04)

With a microbe-produced toxin, bacteria prove old dogs can learn new tricks
In the ongoing chemical battles among bacteria and their microbial neighbors, a new toxin has been uncovered. This unfamiliar toxin behaves in a familiar way. Its actions against other bacteria resemble the mechanisms of cholera, pertussis and diphtheria toxins. Some bacteria deploying this toxin have safeguards against self-poisoning. (2018-10-18)

Scientists propose that vibrios have significant roles in marine organic carbon cycle
Vibrios are genetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria that are ubiquitous in marine environments. Vibrios can utilize a wide range of organic carbon compounds, and have very short replication times, enabling them to proliferate explosively in response to various nutrient pulses. Now researchers in Qingdao have proposed that vibrios may exert large impacts on marine organic carbon cycling, especially in marginal seas. (2018-09-29)

Now is the time to answer questions about climate engineering disease impacts
Radical solutions to climate change might save lives, but a commentary in the October 2018 issue of the journal Nature Climate Change calls for caution because geoengineering still lacks a 'clean bill of health.' (2018-09-28)

How the cholera bacterium survives water predators
EPFL scientists have deciphered mechanisms that help the cholera bacterium to survive grazing predators in aquatic environments. (2018-08-27)

Largest king penguin colony has shrunk nearly 90%
The world's biggest colony of king penguins is found in the National Nature Reserve of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands (TAAF). Using high-resolution satellite images, researchers from the Chizé Centre for Biological Studies (CNRS / University of La Rochelle) have detected a massive 88 percent reduction in the size of the penguin colony, located on Île aux Cochons, in the Îles Crozet archipelago. The causes of the colony's collapse remain a mystery but may be environmental. (2018-07-30)

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