Current Chromium News and Events

Current Chromium News and Events, Chromium News Articles.
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Skoltech team developed on-chip printed 'electronic nose'
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Russia and Germany have designed an on-chip printed 'electronic nose' that serves as a proof of concept for low-cost and sensitive devices to be used in portable electronics and healthcare. (2021-01-28)

Researchers resolve controversy over energy gap of Van der Waals material
Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements revealed that the energy gap of chromium tribromide is around 0.3 electron volt (eV), which is much smaller than optical measurements, which ranged from 1.68 to 2.1 eV. (2021-01-15)

Ultra-thin designer materials unlock quantum phenomena
New research, published in Nature, has measured highly sought-after Majorana quantum states (2020-12-17)

Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside. (2020-12-03)

Building a quantum network one node at a time
University of Rochester and Cornell University researchers create 'optically active spin arrays' within a device that could serve as a node for exchanging photons with distant locations. (2020-11-04)

Towards next-generation molecule-based magnets
Magnets are to be found everywhere in our daily lives, whether in satellites, telephones or on fridge doors. However, they are made up of heavy inorganic materials whose component elements are, in some cases, of limited availability. Now, researchers from the CNRS, the University of Bordeaux and the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble) have developed a new lightweight molecule-based magnet, produced at low temperatures, and exhibiting unprecedented magnetic properties. (2020-10-29)

Reduction by reduction: Novel approach to mitigating chromium contamination in wastewater
Chromium in its hexavalent state (Cr(VI)) is a major water pollutant. It can be treated, however, by converting it into the less toxic trivalent chromium or Cr(III) via 'reduction.' While several methods to facilitate this reduction exist, they are costly and restrictive. Now, scientists have come up with a technique to achieve efficient Cr(VI) reduction with a photocatalytic system in water. This method not only is cost-effective but also has direct applications in wastewater treatment. (2020-10-28)

Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet
An international team of researchers led by the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva studied the atmosphere of the ultra-hot exoplanet WASP-121b. In it, they found a number of gaseous metals. The results are a next step in the search for potentially habitable worlds. (2020-10-08)

How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have investigated how hexavalent chromium, known as Cr(VI), can form in drinking water when corroded cast iron pipes interact with residual disinfectant. Their findings could suggest new strategies to control Cr(VI) formation in the water supply. (2020-09-30)

Study shows heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury
Early results of an experimental vaping study have shown significant lung injury from E-cigarette (eC) devices with nickel-chromium alloy heating elements. The findings were consistent, with or without the use of nicotine, vitamin E oil or tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which have previously been thought to contribute to the life-threatening respiratory problem. (2020-09-28)

Physicists make electrical nanolasers even smaller
Researchers cleared the obstacle that had prevented the creation of electrically driven nanolasers for integrated circuits. The approach enables coherent light source design on the scale not only hundreds of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair but even smaller than the wavelength of light emitted by the laser. This lays the foundation for ultrafast optical data transfer in the manycore microprocessors expected to emerge in the near future. (2020-09-16)

Meteorites show transport of material in early solar system
New studies of a rare type of meteorite show that material from close to the Sun reached the outer solar system even as the planet Jupiter cleared a gap in the disk of dust and gas from which the planets formed. The results, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, add to an emerging understanding of how our Solar System formed and how planets form around other stars. (2020-09-08)

Study finds insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food on the rise, a study led by IUPUI scientists has found new evidence that the yellow mealworm shows promise as alternative source of nutritional protein. (2020-08-31)

A new iron based superelastic alloy capable of withstanding extreme temperatures
Researchers from Tohoku University's Graduate School of Engineering have discovered a novel iron-based superelastic alloy (SEA) capable of withstanding extreme temperatures--both high and low. (2020-08-20)

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances. The method is based on a mechanism known as an indirect exchange interaction. (2020-07-24)

New material can generate hydrogen from salt and polluted water
Developed a new 2D material to produce hydrogen, which is the basis of alternative energy. The material efficiently generates hydrogen molecules from fresh, salt, and polluted water by exposure to sunlight (2020-07-21)

Study proves that magma chambers can be totally molten
The paper shows that basaltic magma chambers may develop as large bodies of crystal-free melts in the Earth's crust. This study challenges a recently-emerged paradigm that magma chambers are huge masses of crystal-rich mush - in other words, crystals with just a very small amount of melt. (2020-06-09)

Solar hydrogen production: Splitting water with UV is now at almost 100% quantum efficiency
Scientists in Japan successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen using light and meticulously designed catalysts, and they did so at the maximum efficiency meaning there was almost no loss and undesired side reactions. This latest breakthrough in solar hydrogen production makes the likelihood of scalable, economically viable hydrogen production more than likely, paving the way for humanity to make the switch to clean energy. (2020-06-03)

Chromium speciation in marine carbonates and implications on atmospheric oxygenation
Qin and colleagues examined chromium (Cr) valence states in sedimentary carbonates and found that Cr(III) dominates in all samples formed in different geological periods. This finding is in apparent contradiction with the previous assumption that marine carbonates directly incorporate Cr(VI) from seawater, suggesting that some positive Cr isotopic values recorded in these rocks cannot be necessarily linked to atmospheric oxygenation events. (2020-05-15)

Filtering out toxic chromium from water
EPFL chemists have developed sponges to capture various target substances, like gold, mercury and lead, dissolved in solution. The sponges are actually porous crystals called metal organic frameworks, and now one exists for capturing toxic hexavalent chromium from water. (2020-05-06)

Rubies on sapphire: Recipe for making crystals in flux
The effect of the holding temperature and solubility curve of rubies was elucidated, for Al2O3:Cr in MoO3 from 1050 to 1200. (2020-05-01)

Researchers help expand search for new state of matter
Scientists have been striving to establish the existence of quantum spin liquids, a new state of matter, since the 1970s. A recent discovery by University of Arkansas physicists could help researchers solve the mystery and result in the next generation of computing. (2020-04-06)

Artificial intelligence identifies optimal material formula
Nanostructured layers boast countless potential properties -- but how can the most suitable one be identified without any long-term experiments? A team from the Materials Discovery Department at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has ventured a shortcut: using a machine learning algorithm, the researchers were able to reliably predict the properties of such a layer. Their report was published in the new journal 'Communications Materials' from March 26, 2020. (2020-03-26)

Co-occurring contaminants may increase NC groundwater risks
Eighty-four percent of the wells sampled in the Kings Mountain Belt and the Charlotte and Milton Belts of the Piedmont region of North Carolina contained concentrations of vanadium and hexavalent chromium that exceeded health recommendations from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. (2020-03-24)

Explosion or collapse?
A group of scientists, among them several from GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and from Technical University of Darmstadt, succeeded to experimentally determine characteristics of nuclear processes in matter ten million times denser and 25 times hotter than the center of our sun. A result of the measurement is that intermediate-mass stars are very likely to explode, and not, as assumed until now, collapse. The findings are now published in the scientific magazine Physical Review Letters. (2020-01-10)

Topological materials for information technology offer lossless transmission of signals
New experiments with magnetically doped topological insulators at BESSY II have revealed possible ways of lossless signal transmission that involve a surprising self-organisation phenomenon. In the future, it might be possible to develop materials that display this phenomenon at room temperature and can be used as processing units in a quantum computer, for example. The study has been published in the renowned journal Nature. (2019-12-18)

Providing safe, clean water
In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. Filtration of large volumes of water, however, is slow and impractical. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a new water purification method based on magnetic nanoparticles coated with a so-called ''ionic liquid'' that simultaneously remove organic, inorganic, and microbial contaminants, as well as microplastics. The nanoparticles are then easily removed with magnets. (2019-11-29)

CUHK Faculty of Engineering develops browser-based analysis framework observer
Malicious third-party advertisers or hackers expose web users to a security threat by injecting malicious JavaScript code to intercept user clicks and trick them into visiting untrusted web content. (2019-11-19)

Pollution from Athabasca oil sands affects weather processes
Scientists have been looking at pollution affecting the air, land and water around the Athabaska Oil Sands for some time. After looking at contaminants in snow taken from up-to 25 km away from the oil sands, a McGill-led scientific team now suggests that oil sand pollution is also affecting the weather patterns in the surrounding regions. (2019-11-18)

Half of Piedmont drinking wells may exceed NC's hexavalent chromium standards
A new study which combines measurements from nearly 1,400 drinking water wells across North Carolina estimates that more than half of the wells in the state's Piedmont region contain levels of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in excess of state safety standards. The prediction is based on a model of geology and chemistry. (2019-11-12)

The first Cr-based nitrides superconductor Pr3Cr10-xN11
New novel Cr-based nitride superconductor is discovered in cubic nitrides Pr3Cr10-xN11 at 5.25 K. The upper critical field Hc2(0) is found to be ~ 12.6 T, exceeding the Pauli paramagnetic pair-breaking limit. Electronic specific-heat coefficient is found to be 170 mJ K-2 mol-1, which is about 10 times larger than that from electronic calculations, which suggests the correlations between 3d electrons are very strong in Pr3Cr10-xN11. Pr3Cr10-xN11 is the first Cr-based Nitrides superconductor. (2019-11-06)

Pressure may be key to fighting climate change with thermoelectric generators
Pressure improves the ability of materials to turn heat into electricity and could potentially be used to create clean generators, according to new work from a team that includes Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov and Viktor Struzhkin published in Nature Materials. (2019-10-07)

Harmful metals found in vapors from tank-style electronic cigarettes
A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found the concentration of metals in electronic cigarette aerosols -- or vapor -- has increased since tank-style electronic cigarettes were introduced in 2013. The tank-style e-cigarettes operate at higher voltage and power, resulting in higher concentrations of metals, such as lead, nickel, iron, and copper, in their aerosols. Most of the metals in e-cigarette aerosols likely come from the components of the atomizer unit. (2019-09-27)

Sandia experiments at temperature of sun offer solutions to solar model problems
The theoretical model that astrophysicists have used for 40 years to determine the behavior and future of the sun is broken. It seems fixable, however, with information from experiments at Sandia's Z machine, done at the temperature of the sun, that can accurately determine how much energy the sun's components allow to pass through them. (2019-09-11)

Metal particles abraded from tattooing needles travel inside the body
Allergic reactions are common side effects of tattoos and pigments have been blamed for this. Now researchers prove, for the first time, that particles wear from the needle during the tattooing process and contain the allergens nickel and chromium and therefore could also induce allergies. (2019-08-26)

High-performance flow batteries offer path to grid-level renewable energy storage
A low-cost, high-performance battery chemistry developed by University of Colorado Boulder researchers could one day lead to scalable grid-level storage for wind and solar energy that could help electrical utilities reduce their dependency on fossil fuels. (2019-07-25)

'Crystal clocks' used to time magma storage before volcanic eruptions
The molten rock that feeds volcanoes can be stored in the Earth's crust for as long as a thousand years, a result which may help with volcanic hazard management and better forecasting of when eruptions might occur. (2019-07-18)

Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles
New research by the University of Plymouth shows that bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations. (2019-06-28)

A new 2D magnet draws future devices closer
EPFL scientists have discovered a new type of 2D magnetic material that can be integrated into spintronic devices. (2019-06-17)

Concert of magnetic moments
An international collaboration between researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, and South Korea has uncovered a new way how the electron spins in layered materials can interact. In their publication in the journal Nature Materials, the scientists report a hitherto unknown chiral coupling that is active over relatively long distances. As a consequence, spins in two different magnetic layers that are separated by non-magnetic materials can influence each other even though they are not adjacent. (2019-06-13)

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