Current Chromosome News and Events

Current Chromosome News and Events, Chromosome News Articles.
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Researchers identify gene implicated in neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer
A new study by Mayo Clinic researchers has identified that a chromosome instability gene, USP24, is frequently missing in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of childhood cancer. The finding provides important insight into the development of this disease. The study is published in Cancer Research, the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2021-02-17)

A genetic variant inherited from Neanderthals reduces the risk of severe COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2 impacts people in different ways after infection. Some experience only mild or no symptoms at all while others become sick enough to require hospitalization. Now, researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Germany have found that a group of genes that reduces the risk of severe COVID-19 by around 20% is inherited from Neanderthals. (2021-02-16)

Neandertal gene variants both increase and decrease the risk for severe COVID-19
Last year, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany showed that a major genetic risk factor for severe COVID-19 is inherited from Neandertals. Now the same researchers show, in a study published in PNAS, that Neandertals also contributed a protective variant. Half of all people outside Africa carry a Neandertal gene variant that reduces the risk of needing intensive care for COVID-19 by 20 percent. (2021-02-16)

The genetic susceptibility of people with Down's syndrome to COVID-19
A study reveals the genetic factors that may expose or protect people with Down syndrome from SARS-CoV-2. TMPRSS2, a gene that codes for an enzyme critical for aiding the entry of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells, had 60% higher levels of expression in Down syndrome. The researchers also found higher expression levels for CXCL10, a gene that can trigger cytokine storms. The authors call to vaccinate people with Down syndrome against COVID-19 as a priority. (2021-02-08)

Glitch in genome architecture may cause B-cell malignancies
Restoring an enzyme that maintains the way chromosomes are packed inside cells may lead to new therapies for some blood cancers, according to a new study by Columbia researchers. (2021-02-01)

Researchers identify genetic dependencies in tumors that have undergone whole genome doubling
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have identified proteins that are essential for the viability of whole genome doubled tumor cells, yet non-essential to normal cells that comprise the majority of human tissue. (2021-01-27)

New variety of paintbrush lily developed by a novel plant tissue culture technique
Scientists at Hokkaido University and Chiba University have developed simultaneous triploid and hexaploid varieties of Haemanthus albiflos by the application of endosperm culture, thus extending the use of this technique. (2021-01-22)

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (2021-01-22)

Snake sex chromosomes say less about sex and more about survival
A new study looks to snakes to broaden our understanding of what makes a gene able to survive on a sex-specific chromosome. Comparing surviving genes on snake sex-specific chromosomes to those that are lost to the ravages of time can teach scientists about the evolutionary pressures that shaped sex chromosomes as we know them today. (2021-01-21)

Unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and duck
Three studies uncovered the unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and Peking duck. Platypus have five pairs of sex chromosomes forming an unusual chain shape, while the sex chromosomes of emu and duck are not as different between sexes as those of human. The studies were led or co-led by Qi Zhou's group at the University of Vienna and Zhejiang University of China and are published as research papers in the journals Nature, Genome Research and GigaScience. (2021-01-07)

Wait for me: Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
UC San Diego cell biologists have found a key clue in the mystery of how chromosomes are inherited correctly every time a cell divides. Using a novel cell probe, they unraveled how a 'matchmaker' molecule stops cell division until components are ready to be split. Precise chromosome duplication is a key factor in proper cell division. If components are altered, even slightly, birth defects and certain cancers can result. (2021-01-06)

Breaking bad: how shattered chromosomes make cancer cells drug-resistant
UC San Diego and Ludwig Cancer Research scientists describe how a phenomenon known as ''chromothripsis'' breaks up chromosomes, which then reassemble in ways that ultimately promote cancer cell growth. (2020-12-23)

Scientists pinpoint molecular cause for severe disorder in children
A team of scientists from the University of Ottawa have opened a window into the cause of a rare genetic disorder that causes mortality in young children. (2020-12-22)

ACE2 protein protects against severe COVID-19: Study
Female COVID-19 patients face less severe disease complications and a lower risk of dying than male patients thanks to hormones and chromosomes that contribute to a stronger immune response, according to new research from a University of Alberta-led team. (2020-12-17)

CCNY scientists provide new insights into cholera microbe and chances of pandemic strain
Researchers at The City College of New York have uncovered a novel way in which Vibrio cholerae, the aquatic microbe that causes cholera, may increase its competitive fitness, and the likelihood of creating pandemic strains of the bacteria. (2020-12-17)

Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a study appearing December 10 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the frequency of exchangeless chromosomes is not affected by maternal age. (2020-12-10)

'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR's unwanted changes problem
Turning off gene-editing until it reaches cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen offers a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes. (2020-12-04)

Wheat diversity due to cross-hybridization with wild grasses
Bread wheat can grow in highly diverse regional environments. An important reason for its great genetic variety is the cross-hybridization with many chromosome fragments from wild grasses. This is shown by the genome sequences of 10 wheat varieties from four continents, which an international consortium including researchers from the University of Zurich has now decoded. (2020-11-25)

Global collaboration is unlocking wheat's genetic potential
In a paper published Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, in Nature, Kansas State University researchers, in collaboration with the international 10+ Genome Project led by the University of Saskatchewan, have announced the complete genome sequencing of 15 wheat varieties representing breeding programs around the world -- an invaluable resource to improve global wheat production. (2020-11-25)

Novel haplotype-led approach to increase the precision of wheat breeding
Wheat researchers at the John Innes Centre are pioneering a new technique that promises to improve gene discovery for the globally important crop. (2020-11-25)

Researchers uncover the unique way stem cells protect their chromosome ends
Telomeres are specialized structures at the end of chromosomes which protect our DNA and ensure healthy division of cells. According to a new study from researchers at the Francis Crick Institute published in Nature, the mechanisms of telomere protection are surprisingly unique in stem cells. (2020-11-25)

Early signs of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down's syndrome
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the incidence and regional distribution of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the brains of people with Down's syndrome. The results can bring new possibilities for earlier diagnosis and preventive treatment of dementia. The study is published in Molecular Neurodegeneration. (2020-11-22)

Near-infrared probe decodes telomere dynamics
A new synthetic probe offers a safe and straightforward approach for visualizing chromosome tips in living cells. The probe was designed by scientists at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Science (iCeMS) and colleagues at Kyoto University, and could advance research into aging and a wide range of diseases, including cancers. The details were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-11-20)

'Domestication' increases mosquito's zika virus susceptibility
The Aedes aegypti aegypti subspecies of mosquito, which has become a ''domestic'' pest worldwide, can acquire and transmit Zika virus more easily than its African forerunner. (2020-11-19)

A gel for dosage compensation
Researchers at the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics have discovered how the MSL complex responsible for dosage compensation can distinguish the X chromosome from autosomes in flies. The Akhtar lab used a unique research approach to determine the minimal molecular components essential for recognizing the X chromosome. The study, now published in Nature, shows that the MSL2 protein and the roX RNA form a gel which ''attaches'' the MSL complex to the X chromosome. (2020-11-18)

The bull Y chromosome has evolved to bully its way into gametes
In a new study, published Nov. 18 in the journal Genome Research, scientists in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member David Page present the first ever full, high-resolution sequence of the Y chromosome of a Hereford bull. The research, more than a decade in the making, suggests that bulls' Y chromosomes have evolved dozens of copies of the same genes in a selfish attempt to make more males -- a move that is countered in the female-determining X chromosome. (2020-11-18)

Picture this: Chromosomes look different than you think
A new method to capture high-resolution, 3D images of human chromosomes in single cells reveals how DNA structure might influence its function (or malfunction). (2020-11-18)

RUDN University biologist found sex differences in inflammatory reactions in rat pups
A biologist from RUDN University studied the development of the immune response in prepubertal male and female animals. According to her, the severity and mortality of infectious and inflammatory diseases at this age depend not on the sex hormones, but mainly on the chromosome set or karyotype. (2020-11-09)

Down Syndrome-associated gene suppresses age-related corneal clouding
Down syndrome and hypercholesterolemia mouse models suggest that the DSCR-1 gene protects against abnormal cornea vascularization and associated blindness by suppressing oxidized LDL cholesterol production and downstream angiogenic signaling during chronic high cholesterol. While the neurological pathology of Down syndrome patients worsens with age, they are less susceptible to age-related vascular diseases. The responsible genes and mechanisms are not yet clear, but DSCR-1 is a strong candidate for a wide range of vascular diseases. (2020-11-05)

Study identifies pitfall for correcting mutations in human embryos with CRISPR
The most detailed analysis to date of CRISPR genome editing in human embryos finds a significant risk of chromosomal abnormalities when using the technique at earliest stage of human development. (2020-10-29)

Stem cells: new insights for future regenerative medicine approaches
The study published in Open Biology unravels important data for a better understanding of the process of division in stem cells and for the development of safer ways to use them in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Scientists use clues in the human genome to discover new inflammatory syndrome
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new inflammatory disorder called vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory and somatic syndrome (VEXAS), which is caused by mutations in the UBA1 gene. VEXAS causes symptoms that included blood clots in veins, recurrent fevers, pulmonary abnormalities and vacuoles (unusual cavity-like structures) in myeloid cells. (2020-10-27)

New therapeutic approach against leukemia
Using an RNA molecule complex, researchers can prevent retention of cancer stem cell in their tumor supporting niche (2020-10-23)

Researchers uncover crucial gene for growth of Ewing sarcoma
Researchers have discovered a gene that is critical for the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare type of developmental cancer that presents in bones and soft tissues. Exploring the pharmacological inhibition of RING1B as a clinical therapy to treat Ewing sarcoma could open the door for new treatments for the rare disease. (2020-10-23)

At our cores, we're all strengthened by 'dumbbells'
Scientists at Rice's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics detail the structure of dumbbell-like sequences in DNA during interphase that suggest several unseen aspects of chromosome configuration and function. (2020-10-21)

Childlessness by circumstance
Why zebra finches have problems with reproduction. (2020-10-20)

Supergene discovery leads to new knowledge of fire ants
A unique study conducted by University of Georgia entomologists led to the discovery of a distinctive supergene in fire ant colonies that determines whether young queen ants will leave their birth colony to start their own new colony or if they will join one with multiple queens. (2020-10-15)

Scientists home in on the mechanism that protects cells from premature aging
A new study by EPFL researchers shows how RNA species called TERRA muster at the tip of chromosomes, where they help to prevent telomere shortening and premature cell aging. (2020-10-14)

Genomes offer new insights into fig-wasp symbiotic system
In a recent study, researchers from Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University (FAFU) and the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) provided insights into fig-wasp coevolution through comparative analyses of two Ficus genomes - one with aerial roots and one without, one monecious and one dioecious, as well as the genome of a coevolving wasp pollinator. They also sequenced more samples of figs and pollinators. (2020-10-09)

Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility. But when there are too many of these genetic exchanges, called crossover events, the segregation of chromosomes into eggs is flawed, say biologists who combined on a basic science project done across three labs at the University of Oregon and Northwestern University. (2020-10-07)

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