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Current Chronic Hepatitis News and Events, Chronic Hepatitis News Articles.
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New model predicts which patients with kidney disease may develop heartbeat irregularities
* A new model that incorporates a type of artificial intelligence can accurately predict which individuals with chronic kidney disease face a high risk of developing atrial fibrillation. * Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-24)

'Patient activation' may improve quality of life in individuals with kidney disease
In individuals with chronic kidney disease who received online peer mentoring, improved patient activation correlated with improvements in various aspects of quality of life. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-23)

A promising discovery could lead to better treatment for Hepatitis C
Virologists at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have identified a critical role played by a cellular protein in the progression of Hepatitis C virus infection, paving the way for more effective treatment. No vaccine currently exists for Hepatitis C virus infection, which affects more than 130 million people worldwide and nearly 250,000 Canadians. Antivirals exist but are expensive and not readily available in developing countries, where the disease is most prevalent. (2020-10-22)

Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
A study from the University of Cordoba (Spain) analyzed degrees of acceptance, popularity and friendship at different stages of victimization in the field of school bullying (2020-10-21)

Children with chronic kidney disease have outsized health burden
Chronically ill children with kidney disease may spend more time in the hospital, incur larger health care costs and have a higher risk of death compared to pediatric patients hospitalized for other chronic conditions, a new study suggests. (2020-10-20)

What San Diego's Hepatitis A outbreak can teach us during COVID-19
The disconnect between the public and government agencies, and how information is communicated on social media during an outbreak was the focus of a study by San Diego State University researchers. They found key lessons that can be applied to the COVID-19 pandemic, which could stem the tide of misinformation currently happening. (2020-10-15)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

Mount Sinai researchers find that where people live can impact their risk for common chronic conditions including high blood pressure and depression
The researchers found that a persons' place of residence substantially influences their risk of uncontrolled chronic diseases including high blood pressure and depression (2020-10-14)

Children with kidney disease have longer hospital stays
Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require hospitalization; however, outcomes of this high risk population are unknown. The authors found that children with CKD had longer hospital stays, incurred higher health care expenses, and were at higher risk of death than children hospitalized for other chronic illnesses. This study suggests that these associations are related to the higher degree of medical complexity among children hospitalized with CKD. (2020-10-12)

Certain pre-existing conditions may double, triple mortality risk for COVID-19
A large, international study of COVID-19 patients confirmed that cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, stroke and cancer can increase a patient's risk of dying from the virus. (2020-10-08)

New research supports sofosbuvir in combination with other antivirals for COVID-19
Columbia Engineering researchers report that Sofosbuvir-terminated RNA is more resistant to the proofreader of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than Remdesivir-terminated RNA. The results of the new study, published today by the Nature Research journal Scientific Reports, support the use of the FDA-approved hepatitis C drug EPCLUSA--Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir--in combination with other drugs in COVID-19 clinical trials. (2020-10-06)

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (2020-10-06)

Study finds yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain
A mindfulness-based stress reduction course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain while 11% remained neutral. (2020-10-01)

Cannabinoids associated with negative respiratory health effects in older adults with COPD
Cannabinoids, a class of prescription pills that contain synthetically-made chemicals found in marijuana, are associated with a 64 per cent increase in death among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the first published data on the impact of cannabinoids on the respiratory health of individuals with the lung disease. (2020-09-30)

New research provides clues on optimizing cell defenses when viruses attack
Researchers studying interferons, immune response proteins released naturally by human cells when viruses are detected, have uncovered new details on the mechanisms underlying cell defenses. They describe the intricate, time-dependent regulatory mechanisms that human cells use to control the duration and strength of antiviral responses triggered by interferon. Based on these findings, researchers are now able to design time-dependent administrations of interferon to minimize inhibitory factors and boost therapeutic responses. (2020-09-29)

HIV drugs could prevent diabetes, study suggests
Patients taking drugs called NRTIs to treat HIV and hepatitis B had a 33% lower risk of developing diabetes. (2020-09-23)

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)

Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for irritable bowel syndrome
Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help University of Queensland-led researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). (2020-09-20)

Primary care clinicians drove increasing use of Medicare's chronic care management codes
To address the problem of care fragmentation for Medicare recipients with multiple chronic conditions, Medicare introduced Chronic Care Management (CCM) in 2015 to reimburse clinicians for care management and coordination. The study showed that CCM use increased over this four-year period, driven largely by primary care physicians. (2020-09-15)

People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day--and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death. (2020-09-15)

No benefit from drug used to reduce heart disease in kidney patients
Following a large, seven-year clinical trial, researchers have shown the drug, lanthanum carbonate, does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. The drug has been commonly prescribed to this patient group to help reduce the risk of both bone disease and cardiovascular disease. (2020-09-14)

Genetic factors in chronic versus episodic migraine
According to existing estimates, migraine is a highly prevalent ailment, with about 15 percent of global population suffering from it at one time or another. In Russia, the ratio is as high as 20 percent. The current diagnostics and treatment methods are strictly clinical, i. e. they are based on a patient's complaints. (2020-09-14)

How does chronic stress induce bone loss?
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have found that bone mineral density in patients with anxiety or depression is lower than in ordinary people. (2020-09-11)

Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism. (2020-09-10)

New UBCO study examines pain tolerance among cannabis users
A recent study examining pain among cannabis users suggests that--unlike long-term opioid use--regular cannabis use does not appear to increase pain sensitivity. Doctoral student Michelle St. Pierre, who conducts research in the psychology department at UBC Okanagan, recently published a study looking for differences in pain tolerance of people who frequently use cannabis compared to those who don't. (2020-09-10)

Polycythaemia vera: Determination of individual DNA variants allows for more effective treatment
Polycythaemia vera is a chronic malignant disease of the haematopoietic system and is treated with interferon-alpha-based drugs, in most cases with long-lasting success. However, in some cases this therapy is unsuccessful for reasons that are not yet understood. A research group led by Robert Kralovics from MedUni Vienna's Department of Laboratory Medicine and from CeMM has now conducted genetic association studies, which show that patients with certain DNA variants commonly found in the population do not respond sufficiently to the treatment. (2020-09-08)

Prophylactic antivirals prevent chronic HCV in patients receiving kidneys from positive donors
Prophylactic treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) prevented chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in 10 patients receiving kidneys from HCV positive deceased donors. This approach has potential to help shorten waiting times on the organ waitlist. A brief research report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-09-07)

These lifestyle choices can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease
Active lifestyle choices such as eating vegetables, exercising and quitting smoking can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease, a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Griffith University in Australia, reports. The study is published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2020-09-02)

Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients
Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients (2020-09-02)

Premature deaths from alcoholic liver disease rising as gap between men and women narrows
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine identifies emerging patterns in the rate of and age at premature death from alcoholic (alcohol-associated) liver disease (ALD) in the US over the last two decades. Significantly, the study documents that since the early 2000s, ALD death rates among non-Hispanic whites, particularly women, have increased more rapidly than rates among non-Hispanic blacks. (2020-08-27)

UofSC researchers reveal how THC may treat acute respiratory distress syndrome
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), when caused by a bacterial toxin known as Staphylococcal enterotoxin, can be completely prevented by treatment with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. (2020-08-26)

Pain 'catastrophizing' may lead to little exercise, more time sedentary
Chronic pain affects the majority of older adults in the US, and getting enough exercise plays a key role in pain management. New research suggests that how people think about their pain can have a significant effect on whether they get enough physical activity - or if they spend more time sedentary. (2020-08-25)

First review of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 infection models
The first comprehensive review of all relevant animal and cellular models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 aims to assist with fast-tracking ongoing research into new preventions and treatments. (2020-08-24)

A Reverse Approach to Vessel Surgery May Boost Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis
A new approach to a surgical procedure required for dialysis offers better long-term viability and a lower chance of complications compared with conventional techniques, according to work involving rats and 274 patients. (2020-08-19)

New practice guidelines on non-invasive ventilation in chronic stable Hypercapnic COPD
A subcommittee of the American Thoracic Society Assembly in Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology has released new clinical practice guidelines to help advise clinicians on the optimal management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic hypercapnia. Hypercapnia is the buildup of carbon dioxide in the bloodstream. (2020-08-17)

Protein produced by the nervous system may help treatments for inflammatory diseases
A Rutgers-led team discover a protein produced by nervous system may be key to treating inflammatory diseases like asthma, allergies, chronic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (2020-08-17)

A new neurofeedback strategy to treat pain
Researchers in Japan and Cambridge have developed a new neurofeedback strategy that might help to treat patients who suffer from chronic pain in the future. They have shown that they can use neurofeedback to boost the brain's natural ability to control pain, in a simple procedure in which people lie in a brain scanner and have their brain activity decoded using AI techniques. (2020-08-13)

Hepatitis B: Natural controllers shed light on immunity mechanisms
To improve our understanding of the antibody response conferring protection against HBV infection, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the Roche Innovation Center in Switzerland, produced and characterized human monoclonal antibodies specific to viral envelope antigens, referred as HBsAg, from blood memory B cells isolated from HBV vaccinees and natural controllers. (2020-08-13)

Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the ''spiky ball'' that encloses its genetic blueprint. They looked at how the capsid--a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell--assembles itself. The capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. (2020-08-13)

Malaria discovery could expedite antiviral treatment for COVID-19
New research into malaria suggests targeting enzymes from the human host, rather than from the pathogen itself, could offer effective treatment for a range of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. (2020-08-11)

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