Current Chronic Illness News and Events | Page 3

Current Chronic Illness News and Events, Chronic Illness News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone. (2020-10-14)

Children with kidney disease have longer hospital stays
Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require hospitalization; however, outcomes of this high risk population are unknown. The authors found that children with CKD had longer hospital stays, incurred higher health care expenses, and were at higher risk of death than children hospitalized for other chronic illnesses. This study suggests that these associations are related to the higher degree of medical complexity among children hospitalized with CKD. (2020-10-12)

Certain pre-existing conditions may double, triple mortality risk for COVID-19
A large, international study of COVID-19 patients confirmed that cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, stroke and cancer can increase a patient's risk of dying from the virus. (2020-10-08)

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (2020-10-06)

Racial bias worse in police killings of older, mentally ill, unarmed men
While young men still bear the brunt of police killings, a new study in the journal Annals of Epidemiology found that police are five times more likely to shoot and kill unarmed Black men over age 54 than unarmed white men the same age. Police are also more likely to shoot and kill unarmed Black men who exhibit signs of mental illness, compared to white men with similar behaviors. (2020-10-05)

A putative mechanism that switches brain pathology from anxiety to depression discovered
In experiments on mice, putative mechanisms for switching brain pathology from a state of experimental anxiety to depression have been discovered by the international team of researchers led by scientists from St Petersburg University (Russia). In the long term, this discovery could make it possible to create new, more effective drugs for mental disorders in humans. (2020-10-02)

Study finds yoga and meditation reduce chronic pain
A mindfulness-based stress reduction course was found to benefit patients with chronic pain and depression, leading to significant improvement in participant perceptions of pain, mood and functional capacity, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Most of the study respondents (89%) reported the program helped them find ways to better cope with their pain while 11% remained neutral. (2020-10-01)

Cannabinoids associated with negative respiratory health effects in older adults with COPD
Cannabinoids, a class of prescription pills that contain synthetically-made chemicals found in marijuana, are associated with a 64 per cent increase in death among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the first published data on the impact of cannabinoids on the respiratory health of individuals with the lung disease. (2020-09-30)

Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. A psychology researcher at the University of Houston has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective. (2020-09-28)

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19. (2020-09-24)

Study of UK key workers shows around half who had COVID-19 symptoms probably did not have the disease
New research from Public Health England (PHE) presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) shows up to half of UK key workers from a cohort of just under 3,000 individuals recruited (including police, fire and healthcare workers) who had self-reported symptoms of COVID-19 did not test positive for antibodies to the disease. (2020-09-24)

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)

Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for irritable bowel syndrome
Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help University of Queensland-led researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). (2020-09-20)

Study links rising stress, depression in US to pandemic-related losses, media consumption
Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic - such as unemployment - and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the US, according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study. (2020-09-18)

Hospitals miss mental illness diagnosis in more than a quarter of patients
Severe mental illness diagnoses are missed by clinicians in more than one quarter of cases when people are hospitalised for other conditions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in PLOS Medicine. (2020-09-17)

Study shows high prevalence of fatigue following SARS-CoV-2 infection independent of COVID-19 disease severity
Research being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that persistent fatigue occurs in more than half of patients recovered from COVID-19, regardless of the seriousness of their infection. The study is by Dr Liam Townsend, St James's Hospital and Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, and colleagues. (2020-09-17)

Primary care clinicians drove increasing use of Medicare's chronic care management codes
To address the problem of care fragmentation for Medicare recipients with multiple chronic conditions, Medicare introduced Chronic Care Management (CCM) in 2015 to reimburse clinicians for care management and coordination. The study showed that CCM use increased over this four-year period, driven largely by primary care physicians. (2020-09-15)

People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day--and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death. (2020-09-15)

An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care. In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulting psychiatrist. (2020-09-15)

No benefit from drug used to reduce heart disease in kidney patients
Following a large, seven-year clinical trial, researchers have shown the drug, lanthanum carbonate, does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. The drug has been commonly prescribed to this patient group to help reduce the risk of both bone disease and cardiovascular disease. (2020-09-14)

Genetic factors in chronic versus episodic migraine
According to existing estimates, migraine is a highly prevalent ailment, with about 15 percent of global population suffering from it at one time or another. In Russia, the ratio is as high as 20 percent. The current diagnostics and treatment methods are strictly clinical, i. e. they are based on a patient's complaints. (2020-09-14)

How does chronic stress induce bone loss?
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have found that bone mineral density in patients with anxiety or depression is lower than in ordinary people. (2020-09-11)

Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the journal Autism. (2020-09-10)

New UBCO study examines pain tolerance among cannabis users
A recent study examining pain among cannabis users suggests that--unlike long-term opioid use--regular cannabis use does not appear to increase pain sensitivity. Doctoral student Michelle St. Pierre, who conducts research in the psychology department at UBC Okanagan, recently published a study looking for differences in pain tolerance of people who frequently use cannabis compared to those who don't. (2020-09-10)

Americans sick with Covid disproportionately poor, minorities, uninsured and food insecure
A new study finds that working-age adults who stayed home sick with symptoms of coronavirus in April-May were more likely to be people of color (Black, Hispanic, Asian), low-income, and have less education, compared to adults who remained working or who were absent from work because of non-Covid illness. The Covid group also had high rates of uninsurance and food insecurity, which could inform any future efforts to help those most impacted by the virus. (2020-09-10)

COPD program decreases 30-day hospital readmission, may increase mortality
The 30-day readmission rate for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has decreased but the mortality rate has increased. Hospitals, in seeking to avoid financial penalties by reducing readmissions, may inadvertently affect minority and disadvantaged patients. (2020-09-10)

Muscle weakness in patients in intensive care: Potential approach to treatment
Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) has taken on a new relevance as a result of the Corona virus. CIM is the specialists' term for a muscle weakness which occurs in patients being treated in intensive care for a longer period of time. In a severe case of a Covid19 infection, for example, many patients need artificial ventilation. Researchers have now found a potential method of treating CIM. The results have been published in ''Nature Communications''. (2020-09-09)

MDIBL scientists decipher role of a stress response gene
A team of scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, led by James A. Coffman, Ph.D., is shedding new light on the gene regulatory pathways activated by cortisol, a hormone secreted in response to stress. Their research helps explain why exposure to chronic stress early in life shortens lifespan and contribute to age-related chronic diseases later in life -- long after the source of stress has been removed. (2020-09-09)

Green light therapy shown to reduce migraine frequency, intensity
A study by University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers found that green light therapy resulted in about a 60% reduction in the pain intensity of the headache phase and number of days per month people experienced migraine headaches. (2020-09-09)

Bronchitis as a child predicts worse lung health in middle age
People who had bronchitis at least once before the age of seven are more likely to develop lung problems in later life, according to new research presented at the 'virtual' European Respiratory Society International Congress. However, the lung diseases they suffer from by the age of 53 were usually asthma and pneumonia rather than chronic bronchitis. (2020-09-03)

These lifestyle choices can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease
Active lifestyle choices such as eating vegetables, exercising and quitting smoking can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease, a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Griffith University in Australia, reports. The study is published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2020-09-02)

Research shows how a diet change might help US veterans with Gulf War illness
A new study from American University shows the results from a dietary intervention in U.S. veterans suffering from Gulf War Illness, a neurological disorder in veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War from 1990 to 1991. (2020-08-31)

Obesity -- the deadly disease that nobody dies of
New research presented at the European and International Conference on Obesity (ECO ICO 2020), held online this year (Sept. 1-4), reveals that obesity and the illnesses it causes rarely appear as an official cause of death on the UK Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (MCCD). (2020-08-31)

Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors
'Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors.' Healthcare systems around the world need to develop ways of supporting people in the community who are recovering from COVID-19, say researchers. If they don't, there is a risk that people experiencing long-term symptoms will get worse and put additional strain on already-stretched health resources. (2020-08-26)

A toxic trio of parental problems strongly linked to childhood sexual abuse
A new study has found that adults who had parents who struggled with substance dependence, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 10 times more likely to have been victims of childhood sexual abuse than those whose parents did not have these problems, once age and race are taken into account. (2020-08-25)

Scientists prove SARS-CoV-2 potential to infect human brain organoids
SARS-CoV-2 can infect human neural progenitor cells and brain organoids, as shown by researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators from The University of Hong Kong (HKU). (2020-08-25)

Housing First proves cost effective especially for the most-vulnerable homeless group
Canadians spend big money dealing with the consequences of homelessness, but the money spent could be far more effective. According to a new McGill-led analysis, housing homeless people with severe mental illness is even more cost-effective than housing homeless people with moderate needs. A Housing-First strategy aimed at helping these individuals regain and keep permanent housing generates savings equal to about two-thirds of its cost. (2020-08-25)

Pain 'catastrophizing' may lead to little exercise, more time sedentary
Chronic pain affects the majority of older adults in the US, and getting enough exercise plays a key role in pain management. New research suggests that how people think about their pain can have a significant effect on whether they get enough physical activity - or if they spend more time sedentary. (2020-08-25)

First review of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 infection models
The first comprehensive review of all relevant animal and cellular models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 aims to assist with fast-tracking ongoing research into new preventions and treatments. (2020-08-24)

Study adds to evidence that cells in the nose are key entry point for SARS CoV-2
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, experimenting with a small number of human cell samples, report that the 'hook' of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs. (2020-08-20)

Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.